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Darren Capeheart 



VOLUME 72 



Samford University 

800 Lakeshore Dr. 

Birmingham, Al. 35229 



I 



i 



The year as a whole was 
"twice as good" as the 
years past. In the fall, the 
old faces of students 
were met by eager new 
faces — called Fresh- 
man. But as the year 
progressed along the 
wheel of time, everyone 
had become an old 
face. And the campus 
had become their home. 
No matter the diverse- 
ness of the backgrounds 
everyone had one com- 
mon interest and one 
main goal— graduation. 
The homes for many had 
changed and most were 
for the better. But mem- 
ories of the old rooms 
were still very vivid. The 
new west campus soror- 
ity houses were a gladly 
welcomed sight for all 
the girls. Though many 
had new homes their was 
one home that was torn 






No matter how often 

defeated, you are born to 

victory. The reward of a thing 

well done is to have done it. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 



Squeal Day is a hot but very exciting day 
for the sororities. Julie Coons, Donna 
Kern, Tracie Thurston, Karen Matthews, Su- 
san Mathes, Marni Smith, Michelle Stan- 
ley, Shannon Howell, Sonnie Folds and 
Kim Huchabee experience the heat of 
Squeal Day. 



Since there are no open dorms Mellyn Peeper, 
Randy Grove, Clint Thomas, Rainer Montgomery, 
Adrienne Ganett, Dana Julian invented open win- 
dows 



Ralph Noble and Monte Starks show their bulldog 
spirit alittle louder than anyone else. 




Andy Ruble 



I 



i 



down and the expansion 
westward continued. 
The house of the Sigma 
Chi Fraternity was taken 
apart piece by piece 
and the fraternity men 
were left homeless. But 
out of the good comes 
the bad and they will be 
one of the first to receive 
a new house next fall. 
On January 16, the stu- 
dents attending Jan Term 
were glued to their tel- 
evision sets. The chatter 
among friends became 
silent as president Bush 
began to speak. Looking 
around in awe and 
searching the television 
for answers the students 
learned of the beginning 
of the war in the Persian 
Gulf. The caf table talk 
was very serious for the 
next couple of weeks 
and a day did not go by 
without the mention of 



The images of men's wits and 
knowledge remain in books.... 

They generate still, and cast 

their seeds in the minds of 

others, provoking and causing 

infinite actions and opinions 

in SUCCeeding ages. -Francis Bacon 



Myrie Grate and Kristin Roberts spend their 
convo hour together in the student center 
helping the Pikes with their fund raiser. 




Jenny Cherry(left) and "Sammy" show their spirit 
for the football team. 



Heather Meincke contributes her time to the wor- 
thy cause of supporting the football team and 
also it's a lot of fun. 




Darren Capehearl 



Andy Ruble 




Andy Ruble 



I 



i 



war. The students sat by 
their televisions in 
amazement and disbe- 
lief. How could we be in 
War??? The effects of the 
war were not felt by the 
students until their old 
friends were being 
shipped to Saudi Arabia. 
The students then wished 
the old faces would be- 
come new once again. 
Their friends, parents and 
aquantances were fight- 
ing in a war that they saw 
only on television. 
The campus events oc- 
curred this year as they 
had in the past, but 
"Twice as Good." There 
were a couple of new 
ideas that were put into 
action. The Panhellenic 
council along with Inter- 
fraternity council spon- 
sored a Greek Weekend 
in the fall, instead of 
Greek Week which usu- 



Men were born to succeed, 

not tO fair' -Henry David Thoreau 



Donna Nelson receives directions from her 
brother Bill Nelson on how to get around the 
campus. 




Angel Fargarson (left) trys to keep the balloons 
from blowing away before their new pledges are 
announced. 



Vilira Bush, Dion Glover, Sonya Hail, and Carolyn 
Johnson keep supporting the Bulldogs even when 
the weather gets chilly. 




Andy Ruble 



Andy Ruble 




Andy Ruble 





At the Homecoming Pep Rally Juniors 
Beth Pugh, Amy Christmas ana Lenora 
Peppers show their SU spirit. 




Jason Montgomery is excited about start- 
ing the new school year as a freshman. 




The sisters of Phi Mu perform their winning 
Step Sing number as "Working Girls." 



WELCOME 
BACK 




The eager freshmen that 
poured onto campus this fall got 
a taste of the thrills to come in 
college life with Welcome Back 
'90. The Welcome Back activities 
were well-attended. Every stu- 
dent asked was quick to de- 
scribe the activities as "a blast!" 

"The creative variety of activ- 
ities gave us a great chance to 
meet people," Susan Johnston, a 
freshman from Anniston, Ala- 
bama, said. 

Festivities swung open Monday 
with the uplifting, contemporary 
sounds of Billy Crockett, one of 
the hottest Christian entertainers 
of today. 

Samford students had the op- 
portunity Tuesday to wind down 
with "Dinner on the Dirt," the an- 
nual back-to-school picnic fol- 
lowed by the annual Sloss Fur- 
nace Dance. 

To some the Sloss Furnace was 
a very familiar place, but to oth- 
ers.... "We drove around at least 
45 minutes in downtown Birming- 
ham looking for a mill, which 
seemed quite stange. What a 
way to be welcomed to Ala- 
bama!" freshman Gina Weigandt 
from Orlando, Florida said. 

The dance at Sloss Furnace 
turned out a lively crowd. The 
heat from the asphalt and large 
crowd did not stop this Welcome 
Back activity from being a hit. 
There was a ton of pizza and lots 
of cokes, which were definitely 
welcomed in that heat! 

That Wednesday evening after 



classes had begun, Vision '90 
was held in Bashinsky Field- 
house and featured more than 
50 church and campus organ- 
izations. And then many of the 
students attended Covenant 
Worship led by the talented 
actor Curt Cloninger and the 
Zambia Mission Team of Sing- 
ers. 

Samford students got a 
chance to show that Bulldog 
spirit at the Samford vs. Ala- 
bama State game at Legion 
Field that Saturday. 

There were no classes on La- 
bor Day, and Samford had 
planned for "Y-B-Normal" to 
play at Howard's. "Y-B- 
Normal" cancelled at the last 
minute but were quickly re- 



The sisters of Alpha Kappa Alpha show 
their AKA spirit at Vision '90. 



placed by another band, "Rush." 
Although the band situation was 
a little shaky, the turnout was su- 
per, and the night was a blast. 

"They ranged from classic rock 
to heavy metal to pop modern," 
one satisfied student said after 
the event. "Rush" did play a va- 
riety of music but mostly progres- 
sive. 

All of the Welcome Back ac- 
tivities, with the exception of Y B 
Normal cancelling at the last 
minute, were successful and a lot 
of fun. What a way to start of the 
new school year! 

Lisa Ollphant and Lynn Waldrep 



1 




WELCOI SB/ 



10 



(Left) Chuck Long and Chris Rowe 
relax for one last time before the 
semester begins. 




Dancing to the beat of the band 
occupies Christa Camp, Lisa Rob- 
ertson, and Michelle Cartwright's 
time before classes begin. 



CM 90 



WELCOME 
BACK 




Jessica Harrison and Lenora Peppers rep- 
resent Zeta Tau Alpha at Vision '90. 




12 



WELCOF SB/ 



Want a piece of watermelon? It's 
real green. 




(Above) Gentry Gonzalez and 
Becky Wobb along with the rest of 
the Howard's crowd listen to the 
music of the band. 



m 



Ruth Duvall and Anne-Marie Turman 
socialize at Dinner on the Dirt. 



CK90 



13 



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LIGHTS, CAMERA, 

ACTION. . .and there defi- 
nitely was plenty of ac- 
tion on location at 
Samford University. Home- 
coming 1990 proudly pre- 
sented the theme "You 
Oughta Be in Pictures" 
during the week of No- 
vember 5-10. 

Scene One: The cafe. In 
the cafe with music and 

?ihts, all watched their 
assmates in a slide 
show. Everyone dined on 
white tablecloths, while 
feasting upon some of the 
cafe's finer food: chicken 
strips, shrimp, steak, etc. 
Intermission proved to be 
exciting as Justin Rudd 
bellowed out Movie Trivia 
Questions. And students 
rushed forward with their 
answers. 

Scene Two: Howard's. 
Bouncing bodies were fly- 
ing through the air to the 
sounds of Mel and the 
Party Hats, as party hats 
and noisemakers were 
popping around. 
Scene Three: LSW, the lo- 
cation of our first 
Samford's Funniest Home 
Videos. Sherie Rothermel 
and Tony Hale emceed 
the night's event and kept 
the crowd rolling in the 
lisles. All Greek organi- 
ations, along with each 
class, gave a shot at pro- 
ucing an exclusive vid- 
o, in hopes of winning 
he Cash Prize! Our dis- 
reet panel of judges 
warded the first place 
urn of $100 to the broth- 
ers of Pi Kappa Alpha, 
whose video was by far 
the most creative and 
cynical of all the videos 
presented. Second place 
was awarded to the Sig- 
ma Chi's, who received 
$75. And Pi Kappa Phi won 
$50 for third place. 
Scene Four: Alabama The- 
atre. As students filled by 
the hundreds into this 
breath-taking place, they 
tasted a bit of the Old 
South. The showing of 
Gone With the Wind 
proved to be just as fan- 
tastic as the historic site in 
which it was shown. Inter- 
mission ushered in good 
ole' Mr. Whitmyer, the in- 



famous organ player. Stu- 
dents chimed right along 
with the piping tunes. 
Scene Five: Red and Blue 
Day. Samford spirit could 
be seen sprinkled around 
the cafe or rushing to 
class. That night brought 
about one of the greater 
tastes of the South, 
Barbeque Night at Bashin- 
sky Field House. After- 
wards, students flocked 
to Wright Concert Hall to 
see the nationally re- 
nowned impersonator, 
Fred Travalena. (Many 
thanks to our Alumni As- 
sociation for this contribu- 
tion to homecoming.) 
Finally, as the end of the 
night approached, the 
gym filled up with rowdy 
students ready to offer 
some pep to the Pep Ral- 
ly. The presentation of the 
football team, without 
whom there would be no 
homecoming, brought 
about many cheers from 
the crowd. However, the 
senior class proved to be 
the most spirited, when 
they shouted out at the 
top of their lungs. In ad- 
dition to the most spirited 
award, an award of best 
class decorations was 
given to the junior class. 
Then guys and gals dis- 




Beth Monroe receives Homecoming Queen and 
Justin Rudd. 



Darren Capeheart 

she is escorted by 




Darren Capeheart 

"Give me a S" screams Lee Hale as he leads the cheerleaders and the crowd at the Homecoming 
football game. 



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Sophomores believe they have the most spirit as they cheer at the pep rally. 




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Barbeque at its best. 




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After the pep rally, students dance with KIX 106 



Andy Ruble 



15 



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You Oughta Be In Pictures 




Andy Ruble 

The Friday Festivities included a delicious Barbeque and Live entertainment in 
the house enjoyed by all. 



Christy Burkeen, Jus- 
tin Rudd, Brad Wal- 
ler, and Rich John- 
son along with other 
seniors sport their 
spirit at the Pep Ral- 
ly. 




played "their stuff" at the Dance Par- 
ty, dj'ed by no other than Birming- 
ham's own KIX 106. 
Scene Six: the Game. Red and blue 
pom-poms filled the stands, when we 
whomped on Concord College 49 to 
6. As half-time neared, the question 
that all eagerly asked was "Who will 
be this year's queen?" Would it be 
Susan Byrd, Julie Coons, Beth Mon- 
roe? Finally, the moment of excite- 
ment peaked as Miss Beth Monroe, 
escorted by Justin Rudd, was crowned 
the 1990-91 Homecoming Queen. 
Beth, a member of Alpha Delta Pi so- 
rority, is an Elementary Education ma- 
jor. Congratulations, Beth; this is a 
much deserved honor. 
Scene Seven: The Ball. Dressed in their 
finest attire, the couples were shuttled 
by limo from the parking garage to 
the grand Winfrey Hotel. Upon reach- 
ing their destination, the couples 
were made stars for the night, as 
flashes from the Zap man's camera 
captured the moment of their exit 
from the limo. Inside the hotel, stu- 
dents jammed to the tunes of the Gar- 
den Party. This was the end to a fun- 
filled and perfect week. 
Lauren Fields, homecoming chair- 
man, commented that the turn-out of 
the previous week was "the best 
(homecoming) we've had in the four 
years since I have been here. I be- 
lieve that since our theme was a good 
one, as well as an easily relatable 
one, it carried over well with the stu- 
dents." 

And yes, somehow students did man- 
age to shuffle their busy schedules 
around to participate in the frivolity of 
1990 Homecoming. It was a good 
one, and remember — You Were the 
Stars of the Show. 

Ashley Leech 



Andy Ruble 



Coach Bowden talks to the bull- 
dog team and prepares them for 
the upcoming game. 




16 



Andy Ruble 







Andy Ruble 

Austin Alldregde dances the night away at the Homecoming Ball. 




Andy Ruble 

Brian Black introduces his date to Chip Wise at the Ball. 




Andy Ruble 

Students enjoy the music as they dance to the music of the "Garden 
Party". 



17 



TENSION- 
BREAKER 

BSU Fall Carnival 



Fall Carnival was a great ten- 
sion-breaker this year for those 
involved and those who just 
wanted to have some fun. Ac- 
cording to Scott McBrayer, Vice 
President of SGA, "I really en- 
joyed Fall Carnival this year. My 
favorite thing was the egg- 
throwing contest." SGA had a 
booth which sold chances on 
giving away two Step Sing tick- 
ets, Homecoming tickets, clothes 
from the bookstore, and food 
from Howard's. Junior, Brian Wa- 
ters replied, "My favorite booths 
were the dunking booth and the 
egg throwing contest. I liked it in 



"I really enjoyed 
Fall Carnival this 
year. My favorite 
thing was the egg- 
throwing contest." 
Scott McBrayer 



Brown Plaza because it was right 
there at the student center." Jun- 
ior, Kim Wood said, "I also liked 
the egg-throwing contest. It's 
better at Brown Plaza because 
you didn't have to hike all the 
way over to the gym and tennis 
courts for the Fall Carnival." 

Ann Chastain and Theresa 
Hawkins, leaders from the Exec- 
utive Council of Campus Minis- 
tries, were in charge of Fall Car- 
nival. Fall Carnival, which raised 
over $1300 this year, gives all it 
money to Summer Missions. 
Samford leads the nation in the 



number of missionaries sent out 
through the Home Mission 
Boards. Summer Mission's booth 
this year handed out literature 
educating the public about Sum- 
mer Missions and also they en- 
couraged people to buy one of 
their "big cookies" which was 
made by the Cafeteria. These 
cookies can have messages on 
them such as "Happy Birthday" 
or "Good Luck". 

Many responded positively to 
the location of the carnival, 
which was in Ben Brown Plaza, 
outside the Business Building. In 
the years past, Fall Carnival had 
been held in Bashinsky Field 
House and the tennis court park- 
ing lot. According to Ms. Jenny 
Bridges, the reason they had to 
move it to Brown Plaza this year 
was because parking would now 
be a problem because of West 
Campus housing. The space 
which had been used for Fall Car- 
nival Parking were now parking 
lots of the sorority houses. She 
also said Brown Plaza gives a 
stronger sense of unity between 
students. And the new location 
also inables the night students to 
get involved. 

Different campus organiza- 
tions, and Greek organizations 
had booths. Among the different 
booths were a pie-throwing con- 
test, flower throw, dunking booth, 
a jail, a booth which sold coffee 
and beignets, and many more. 
The Fall Carnival has a truly wor- 
thy cause and it breaks the ten- 
sion of classes and studying. 








18 




All pictures by Andy Ruble. 



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(Left) Blake Spang tries to persuade Scotty 
Utz to place money in Alpha Delta Pi's fall 
carnival project. 



"Ten dollars, anybody want to pay ten dol- 
lars!" Auctioneers Freddie Boan and Chuck 
Gore sell these lucky Zetas Dana McCants, 
Lee Carol Griffen and Jeanne Tedford for 
manual labor. But it does go for a good 
cause. 






(Above) This pumpkin reflects the mood of Fall Carnival and it helps light Brown Plaza 
where the carnival was held. 



"SMACK AND CRACK" was heard as eggs were 
thrown at the BSU egg toss. Many said this was the 
best booth. 



19 




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"Number 1, Where is num- 
ber 1?" "Number 1 you are 
on stage next!!" These are a 
few of the paniced behind 
the scene screams as the 
curtains for the Miss Samford 
Universtiy Pageant began to 
raise. The opening number 
consisted of all the contes- 
tants singing "Tonight's The 
Night." Mistress of the Cer- 
emonies was Resha Riggins, 
Miss Alabama 1990. The 
judging for Miss Samford be- 
gan on Wednesday night 



Top Ten members Julie Benton, Car- 
rie Tillis, Tara Siegfried and Susset 
Osaba below wait anxiously to 
continue the competition. 




and it came to a close on 
Thursday night. The contes- 
tants were judged on Inter- 
view, Swimsuit, Talent, and 
Evening Gown. On Wednes- 
day night the judges had 
made their discision on the 
Top Ten Winners. On Thurs- 
day night the Top Ten had to 
compete once again in their 
swimsuit, talent and evening 
gown. The Top Ten were as 
follows: Lara Evers, Andrea 
Green, Julie Bention, Chris- 
tie Blanton, Susset Osaba, 



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Andrea Green sponsored by the A 
Cappella Choir performs her talent 
and dazzles the audience. 



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First runner-up Beth Richerson gives the judges one last 
glance as she returns to her place on stage. 




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Beth Richerson, Tara Sieg- 
fried, Carrie Tillis, Paige Wal- 
drop, and Debbie Wilgus. 
Entertainment was provided 
by Paige Sutton, Miss 
Samford 1990, and Resha 
Riggins, Miss Alabama. The 
overall swimsuit award went 
to Dana Glassclock, Junior, 
from Homewood, AL. She 
was sponsored by Phi Mu. 
The overall talent award was 
presented to Suzanne 
Brown, Senior, from Opelika, 
AL. She was sponsored by 
Alpha Delta Pi. After the an- 
nouncement of the Overall 
awards the Top Five were 
announced. Fourth runner- 
up was Debbie Wilgus, Soph- 
omore, from Winter Park, FL. 
She was sponsored by Chi 
Omega. Third runner-up was 
Andrea Green, Junior, from 
Huntsville, AL. She was spon 



1 



Debbie Wilgus from Winter Park, FL mystifys 
the audience with her piccoln. 



21 



All photos by Andy Ruble 



sored by A Cappella 
Choir. Second runner-up 
was Paige Waldrop, Fresh- 
man, from Birmingham, 
AL. She was sponsored by 
Lambda Chi Alpha. First 
runner-up was Beth Rich- 
ardson, Sophomore, from 
Birmingham, AL. She was 
sponsored by Alpha Delta 
Pi. Miss Samford University 
for 1991 was Christie 
Blanton, Freshman, from 
Jacksonville, FL. She was 



sponsored by Lambda 
Chi Alpha. The pageant 
was made possible by 
Beth Monroe-director. Her 
committee consisted of 
Suzanne Campell, Julie 
Coons, Rebecca Dewber- 
ry, Casey Fitzsimons, Brent 
Glossinger, Angle Green, 
Holly Howell, Ruth Hud- 
son, Alleyne Mooney, Ma- 
ry Prugh, and Justin 

RUdd. Donna Kern 




Tara Siegfried listens carefully as her question is being 
read to her from the Judges. 





Contestants Beth Richerson, Tara Sieg- 
fried, Carrie Hills, Alicia Pagan, and Sus- 
set Osaba sing the opening number 
"Tonight's The Night." 



Top Ten Winner Carrie Til t is pours her heart 
into her talent. 



23 



Running from class to 
class while striving to 
finish homework early, 
many students found 
themselves lacking 
free time during the two 
weeks prior to Step Sing 
'91. Organizations all 
over campus crammed 
in as many rehearsals 
as were allowed In 
preparation for the 
event. In the back of all 
the participants' minds 
was the same question: 
Who would win Sweep- 
stakes this year? 
Planning for programs 
began as early as Sep- 
tember or October for 
most groups as they 
tried to develop the 
perfect theme. After 
pinpointing the theme, 
groups started looking 
for someone to arrange 
their scores and their 
choreography. In late 
November signs went 
up all over campus dis- 
playing the need for 





Chuck Long, Brad Jacobs, Bill 
Nelson, and Jody Roberts (far 
left) want to know "How Deep 
Is Your Love" 

Richard Thompson fishes off 
"The Dock of the Bay" for a 
Second Place Trophy in the 
competition. 



Photographic Services 



Andy Ruble 




Tricia Brown, Ashley McCreary, Julie Anderson, 
Ashly Hawkins, Laurie Tootle, and Donna Jo 
Schilleci show the audience how sweet the 
"Candy Man" can be by singing their very best. 



25 





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BSU has first place up their alley with a perfect presentation of "Everybody Wants To Be a Cat." 




Singing a "Song of 
the South" for two con- 
secutive "Southern 
Nights," the freshman 
class paid tribute to the 
place many call home 
— the South. Contrary 
to "If the South Had of 
Won," the freshman 
class did win, placing 
second in the Mixed Di- 
vision. 

Lurking on stage fol- 
lowing the freshman 
class were the 
"Shadows of the Night" 
in the junior class. In 
their performance of a 
"Nightmare on 

Lakeshore Drive," the 
juniors were a "Thriller" 
and a winner of third 
place. 

From Under the Sea," 
the sophomore class 
dove in and splashed 
around on a "Sea 
Cruise" in an "Age of 
Aquarius." 

As "Zion's Soldier," 
the MAs were quick to 



MIXED 




Deborah Franklin, Stephanie Kirkley, Lila Schuessler, Becky Dickson, and the rest of the Freshman Class 
sing the songs "That You Know and Love So.'" 



26 



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DIVISION 



Members of the Junior Class 
turn "A Nightmare on 
Lakeshore" into a third place 
win. 



The Ministerial Association 
bears the cross in a world of 
"Spiritual Warfare." 




"Run to the Battle," but 
not without remember- 
ing that it takes the 
"Strong to Surrender" 
to God's cause. 

Following in a tribute 
to those fabulous fe- 
lines, BSU Choir pur-r-r- 
fectly presented 
"Everybody Wants to Be 
a Cat." Either as a 
"Black Cat," "Honky 
Cat," or "Stray Cat," 
the audience curled up 
in their seats to savor 
the sounds of the BSU 
Choir, winner of first 
place Mixed Division. 

Whether going eating 
or cleaning up from the 
South to the sea, each 
organization — Put It 
Togetherl! 

Meldnle Green 



Come along with Lynn Hadden and the Soph- 
omore Class as they go "Under The Sea" 



Photographic Services 



27 




All photos by Andy Ruble 

The ladies of Zeta Tau Alpha dance to "Lollipop" and take third place in the competition. 



WOMEN'S 



Once again, five soror- 
ities — Alpha Delta Pi, Chi 
Omega, Delta Zeta, Phi Mu 
and Zeta Tau Alpha — 
competed for first place 
in Women's Division of 
Step Sing 1991. 

It was the sisters of Phi 
Mu who took first place, as 
well as Sweepstakes, with 
their show "Working." 
They wore blue satin 
"working" suits and sang 
such songs as "Nine to 
Five," Taking Care of Busi- 
ness" and "Working in a 
Coal Mine." 

The sisters of Alpha Del- 
ta Pi received second 
place for their "Derby" 
show. The sisters wore col- 
orful green, purple and 
white satin derby uniforms 
and sang such songs as 
"Run for the Roses," "The 
Race Is On" and "Horse 
With No Name." 

The "Candy" show pre- 
sented by the sisters of 
Zeta Tau Alpha placed 
third in Women's Division. 




The sisters of Phi Mu proudly pose with the hard earned Sweepstakes Trophy. 



28 




DIVISION 



The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi 
amaze the audience with 
their choreography to "The 
Race Is On." 



Debbie Wilgus clowns around 
with the audience as the sis- 
ters of Chi Omega sing "Send 
In the Clowns." 




Dressed in bright pink and 
white dresses, they sang 
"Lollipop," "Candy Man" 
and "Candy Girl." 

The sisters of Chi Omega 
presented "Send in the 
Clowns." They wore yel- 
low and red clown suits 
and sang "Send in the 
Clowns," "Tears of a 
Clown" and "Clowns." 

Dressed in old- 
fashioned bathing suits, 
the sisters of Delta Zeta 
performed to songs such 
as "Summertime," "Sum- 
mer Nights" and "Summer 
Breeze." 

Celeste Fowler 



During the cold month of February Christy Car- 
penter, Staci Carnley, Sharon Brown, Amy King, 
Krista Otto, Jennifer Admire, Susan Baugh and 
the other sisters of Delta Zeta bring a little sum- 
mertime to the audience. 



29 















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Photographic Services 

Sigma Chi's are "On Top Of The World" as they take first place in the men's division. 



MEN'S 






The variety within this 
years' Men's Division 
added the final spice 
to this years' Step Sing. 

Sigma Chi once 
again combined their 
numbers and voices to 
claim the first place ti- 
tle. Their theme "On Top 
of the World" proved to 
ring true as they sang of 
"A Perfect World" and 
"Teaching the World to 
Sing in Perfect Harmo- 
ny." 

The brothers of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha captured 
the second place tro- 
phy. With their overalls, 
red bandanas and 
straw hats, their "RollirV 
on the River" theme 
came into existence. 

The brothers of Pi 
Kappa Phi thought they 
were "On the Way To 
Heaven" as they 
placed third in the 




The Sigma Nu's continue to Rock n Roll even though STEP SING STILL SUCKS. 



30 




Lambda Chi Alpha places 
second in the men's division 
while "Rollin' on the River." 



The brothers of Pi Kappa Al- 
pha disco their way into the 
hearts of the audience. 



Andy Ruble 



Photographic Services 



DIVISION 




Men's Division. 
Sideburns, disco fever 
and a good time! The 
show of Pi Kappa Alpha 
captured the true es- 
sence of Step Sing. The 
crowd enjoyed their 
songs such as "Freak 
Out" and "Stayin" 
Alive," but their unique 
movements added to 
the spirit! 

"Old-Time Rock and 
Roll" was the theme of 
the brothers of Sigma 
Nu. Their songs includ- 
ed "Oldies but Good- 
ies," "Rock Around the 
Clock," and "Rock This 
Town." 

Lisa Ollphant 



On the way to "Heavin" the brothers of Pi Kap- 
pa Phi stopped to place third in the compe- 
tition. 



31 




I • • /1s 




All photo* by Andy Ruble 

The brothers of PI Kappa Alpha have fun while pleasing the audience with their rendition of "Disco Duck" 




STEP SING 



band members. Try- 
outs were held not long 
after for the ten mem- 
ber band that would 
perform the scores for 
the program. Mark Ful- 
ler and his concert hall 
staff began the con- 
struction of the stage 
and the set-up of all the 
new equipment need- 
ed for this year's pres- 
entation. 

As February 15th 
neared, competition 
grew, and each day 
became more stressful 
than the one before. 
However, when the 
lights went on for Delta 
Zeta and dress rehears- 
al began, all partici- 
pants knew that their 
hard work and dedica- 
tion were well worth the 
effort. Step Sing was 
once again a huge suc- 
cess. 

Tiffany Towruend 




The sisters of Chi Omega keep the audience smiling as they sing "Tears of a Clown." 



32 



Alan Espy, Patrick Howell and 
Eric Brown ask the audience 
to join them In bringing back 
that "Old Time Rock-n-Roll." 



Denlse Parker (Left) is ex- 
hausted yet relieved that 
Step Sing is over and all her 
hard work paid off because 
she is a member of the win- 
ning group, Phi Mu 




The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi keep the audience 
guessing as they perform with great precision. 



MISS MISTER 



This first Miss Mister 
Samford University Con- 
test was indeed a first. 
Competition consisted 
of guys from the base- 
ball team to the soccer 
team to fraternity row. 

Sponsored by various 
campus organizations, 
these guys performed 
hidden talents, strutted 
In evening gowns and 
gave an incredibly new 
look to femininity. From 
house slippers to high 
heels, each contestant 
put on his own show. The 
audience fell Into a 
comic hysteria at their 
performances. 

A new octave in the 
Soprano range was dis- 
covered, as well as new 
heights in hair styles and 
techniques in make-up 
application. It was 
amazing to see what 
mascara and lipstick 
could do for male ma- 
nia. 

Alio proceeds from 
this humorous event 
went towards the Cystic 
Fibrosis Foundation. 

Freshman Cherry 
Makurdia (Chuck 
Macurda) paraphrases 
the show's theme: "I wish 
I could be like them." 

Emcee Justin Rudd 
presented the following 
winners: 4th runner-up: 
Rachelle Nicoli (Russell 
Nolen); 3rd runner-up: 
Bambi Misser (Jeff 
Kyzer); 2nd runner-up: 
Glenda Seeyalater 
(Glen Seay); 1st runner- 
up: Keniti Roseman 
(Kenyon Ross) and Miss 
Mister: Christini Musolini 
(Chris Savage). 




Chuck Macurda sings with all his might to please the audience. 



34 




Kenyon Ross, Glen Seay, Jeff 
Kaiser, and Russell Nolan 
anxiously await the an- 
nouncement of the winners 
by M.C. Justin Rudd. 



Glen Seay (far left) sings to girl 
on the front row. 



Jeff Kaiser dances to Swan Lake. 



35 



THE CRY 

OF THE 

COCKATRICE 



Specially written for the 1991 
Birmingham Festival of Arts sa- 
lute to Great Britain, THE CRY 
OF THE COCKATRICE ran April 
25-30. The work was almost a 
year in preparation by theatre 
faculty members and play- 
wright/designers, Barbara and 
Eric Olson, along with compos- 
er Brett Dollar, choreographer 
Edie Barnes and craftperson, 
Tana Lee Thigpen. Not a play, 
but a multi-arts theatre piece, 
the who was filled with music, 
dance, startling visual images, 
puppets and poetry. 

"Having been fans of Joseph 
Campbell's work for several 
years," says Barbara Olson, 
"we knew we wanted to ex- 
plore a myth. We discovered a 
rather obscure story of the 
cockatrice, a creature which is 
hatched by serpents from a 
cock's egg and can turn peo- 
ple to stone with a single 
glance. According to legend, 
the cockatrice terrorized the 
English countryside around the 
5th century until a hero found 
a way to kill the beast." 

Cast members for THE CRY OF 
THE COCKATRICE included 
Brent Wadsworth, Sherrie 
Rothermel, Laura Kilgore, Mil- 
dred Lanier, Marty Johnson, 
Bart McGeehon, Autumn Bag- 
gott, Joe McEachln, Michelle 
Mohr, Penny Edwards, Rebec- 
ca Edwards, Wendy Irvin, Jesse 
Tilton, Christy Mason, Kathy 
Fulford, Amy Cheek, Lisa Car- 
ter, Angle Hlnes, Kim Younce, 
Mary Ann Taylor, Stacey Flem- 
ing, Billy Spivey, Drew Benson 
and Glnny Sawyer. 





The Elders and the bog people (above) explore 
the myth of the "Cry o( the Cockatrice". 



Mildred Lanier and Brent Wadsworth (upper right) 
portray the spirit and the hero in the "The Cry of the 
Cockatrice". 



The Elders and the bog people (upper right) mes- 
merize the audience with their performance. 




36 




All photoi b* Barbara Olion. 




THE HOLLOW 



CROWN 



To end the Festival of Arts sa- 
lute to Great Britain season, 
the Theatre produced THE HOL- 
LOW CROWN, May 2-5. Adapt- 
ed by John Barton, the work 
was a delightful evening of en- 
tertainment by and about the 
Kings and Queens of England, 
containing music, poetry, 
speeches, letters and other 
writings of the monarchs. 

Debate coach Janet Keys di- 
rected THE HOLLOW CROWN. 
Alumni Glna Billy, Kenny Gan- 
non and Leah Taylor Patterson 
were readers, Joined by alum- 
nus and Dean of Arts and Sci- 
ences, Roderick Davis. Faculty 
musicians Tim Banks and Steve 
Nelson performed along with 
music alumnus, Howard Good- 
win. Set designer was H. Bart 
McGeehon, lighting designer, 
Sherrle Rothermel and stage 
manager, Jennifer Baker. 



Autumn Baggott, Bart McGeehon, Mildred Lanier, Laura Kllgore, Kim Younce, and Lisa Carter listen 
to the hero played by Brent Wadsworth. 



37 



THE ROAR OF THE 
GREASEPAINT, 

THE SMELL OF THE CROWD 



The University Theatre 
kicked off its 68th season 
with the amusing and 
tuneful English musical, 
THE ROAR OF THE GREASE- 
PAINT, THE SMELL OF THE 
CROWD. 

Unlike some musicals 
from the '60s era, GREASE- 
PAINT is surprisingly fresh 
and not overly produced. 
Tunes like "A Wonderful 
Day Like Today," "The 
Joker" and "Nothing Can 
Stop Me Now!" all vital- 
ized contemporary con- 
cerns like hunger and 
homelessness. 

In the show, the game 
of life is played by Cocky 
and Sir, revealing a world 
of the Haves versus the 
Have-nots. A perky chorus 



of street urchins enliven 
the game. The cast in- 
cluded Bart McGeehon, 
Joe McEachin, Sherrie 
Rothermel, Laura Kilgore, 
Mildred Lanier, Jason 
Graves, Emily Brown, Ka- 
ren Malone, Tori Roberts, 
Autumn Baggott, Michelle 
Mohr, Mary Ann Taylor 
and Lisa Carter. 

Alpha Psi Omega hon- 
orary fraternity students 
decided that they wanted 
to have social as well as 
artistic outreach. There- 
fore, they teamed up with 
the Samford Sociological 
Association to sell re- 
freshments at all perfor- 
mances with proceeds 
going to Habitat for Hu- 
manity. 



Bart McGeehon plays "Sir" in the English musical THE ROAR OF THE 
GREASEPAINT AND THE SMELL OF THE CROWD. 




Sherri Rothermel "Kid" and Joe 
McEachin "Cocky" are sur- 
rounded Laura Kilgore "The Girl" 
and the Urchins played by Mary 
Ann Taylor, Emily Brown, Karen 
Malone, Lisa Carter and Tori 
Roberts. 




38 



THE TEMPEST 




William Shakespeare's magical 
and intriguing work, THE TEMPEST 
wove together many puzzle pieces 
to create this masterful work: an en- 
chanted island peopled with ele- 
mental spirits, a shipwreck, a ban- 
ished duke with a beautiful 
daughter, the bestial son of a long- 
dead witch. 

Faculty members Barbara and Er- 
ic Olson designed the scenery, 
lighting and costumes for this 
Shakespearean extravaganza. 
Cast members include Marty John- 
son, Tre Shepard, Laura Kilgore, Re- 
becca Edwards, Brent Wadsworth, 
Lisa Carter, Neal Brasher, Mark 
Reed, Douglan Ford, Jason Graves, 
Steven Whatley, Penny Edwards, 
Sherrie Rothermel, LeAnne Brow- 
ning, Michelle Mohr, Christy Mason, 
Brian Scott, Autumn Baggott, and 
Mary Ann Taylor. Barbara oison 



Marty Johnson plays in Shakespeare's THE 
TEMPEST. 



Rebecca Edwards and Brent Wadsworth 
place the audience in "awe" with their per- 
formance. 




A MEDIEVAL 



CHRISTMAS 



CELEBRATION 



Another British play was 
selected as centerpiece for 
a Medieval Christmas Cele- 
bration, directed by Sherrie 
Rothermel who was award- 
ed the Gail Patrick Directing 
Award for her work on this 
piece. Jennifer Baker assist- 
ed Rothermel in the produc- 
tion. 

At the core of the cele- 
bration was THE SECOND 
SHEPERD'S PLAY, a humorous 
portrayal of a sheep thief 
and three shepherds who 
ended up going to see the 
newborn Christ Child. Taking 
the role of Mak, the thief, 
and his wife Gill were Tre 
Sheppard and Michelle 
Mohr. The other sheperds 
were played by Doug Ford, 
Joe Mc Eachin, and Bruce 
Powers. Angels were Carrie 
Till js, Autumn Baggott, Mary 
Ann Taylor, Amy Creek, and 
Angie Rue; Wise Men were 
Hayes Purdue, Jeff Jackson 
and Brian Scott. 

Music direction was han- 
dled by Dr. Deborah Loftis 
who led the Schola Canto- 
rum group in singing au- 
thentic medieval music. 
They were joined by the 
elaborately costumed Ves- 
tavia Hills High School Mad- 
rigal Choir who performed 
Christmas Carols. LeAnne 
Browning designed the sce- 
nery, lighting and props, for 
which she won Students De- 
signer of the Year. Lisa Car- 
ter was in charge of cos- 
tumes. Barbara Olson 



All photos by Barbara Olson. 



39 



Doing it with 



Just when the weather starts 
to warm up and the birds be- 
gin to sing and students be- 
gin to receive spring fever 
there is a tension outlet. It is 
called Spring Fling and it hit 
the campus with STYLE. This 
year the first tension out- 
break was released at the 
band party on Thursday 
night. The students let off 
steam as the "Penguins" 
played in the Fieldhouse. 
On Friday night, the students 
played "Win, Lose, or Draw" 
in the Cafe. After the 
gameshow the students had 
a relaxing evening as they 
enjoyed a movie. On Satur- 



day the events continued as 
the guad was filled with stu- 
dents playing games and 
eating lunch. The sun was 
shining and the students 
were relaxed not thinking of 
all the school work that had 
to be done. In charge of this 
extravaganza was senior, 
Tracie Thurston. She and her 
committee brought style to 
spring and gave the stu- 
dents a needed break. Donna 



Mike Scharbert plays badminton in 
the quad during Saturdays festiv- 
ities. 




All photos by Andy Ruble 




Molli Barrentine, Courtney Camp, Beth Nabors, Laura King, Tracy Watson, and Christy Burkeen are all smiles as they listen to "The Penguins' 



40 



SPRING FLING 




Jay Johnson and Jonathan Puttman listen to Lisa Bishop and Frank as they play their guitars on the quad. 



41 



A 
PERFECT 
ENDING 



A perfect ending that leads to a 
new beginning. This sums up grad- 
uation for most seniors. As they 
proceeded down the isle of the Bir- 
mingham-Jefferson Civic Center 
the emotion felt was wonderful yet 
scary. This ends all the good times 
because "your best years are your 
college years" stated by most par- 
ents. Is this true most seniors won- 
dered? Have my best years disap- 
peared? As once found in a fortune 
cookie: "Life does not end at 21, it 
only gets better." Therefore, the les- 
son of this fortune could be that 
graduation only leads to more suc- 
cess. For the graduates traveled 
down the college road to achieve 
success therefore it must not be far 
behind. 



Seniors are listening attentively to the 
speaker. 



42 





Susan Byrd and fellow classmates sing the alma 
mater. 
















Sherry Ingram receives recognition for having the highest grade 
point average at Samford University. 



43 



A 

NEW 

BEGINNING 



This was the largest grad- 
uating class with a total of 
1,039 seniors. And the Com- 
mencement took place on 
May 18, 1991 at 10am. The 
guest speaker was Tom 
Wicker a reporter and col- 
umnist with the New York 
Times. 

During the past four years 
many changes have oc- 
cured. The sororities have 
gone from rooms in Vail to 
houses in West Campus. The 
Bashinsky press box was 
built last summer and a new 
parking garage was in pro- 
cess this year. There have 
been changes in rules as 
well as regulations. The stu- 



dents began to dance as 
Freshman and by the time 
they were seniors they were 
allowed to have open 
dorms, once in a while. The 
night life of Howard's was 
opened up and movie night 
was initiated. The Samford 
Computer Corp. was started 
as well as the Samford Soc- 
cer Team. But the most re- 
membered will be the start 
and the finish of the war in 
the Persian Gulf — Desert 
Storm. Seniors will remem- 
ber their friends and family 
members fighting and the 
feelings that were felt as our 
country bound together as 
one. 




Beth Oslander and Melissa Fleagle are recognized as the Salutorians. 



44 




45 



SORORITY HOUSES: 



Samford's West Cam- 
pus received three new 
residence halls this 
year. The sisters of Al- 
pha Delta PI, Chi Ome- 
ga, and Zeta Tau Alpha 
sororities were the first 
to live in the West Cam- 
pus Housing dorms. 
"The university built 
these three wonderful 
facilities and gave the 
Greek organizations an 
opportunity to be 
a part of them," Claire 
Gwaltney, chapter ad- 
viser for Alpha Delta Pi, 
said. 

The three sororities cho- 
sen to occupy these 



first houses invested 
$50,000 to apply for 
one of the dorms, which 
are owned by Samford. 
"The size of the chap- 
ter, its grade point av- 
erage and the sorority's 
overall relationship 
with the university were 
considered in making 
the choice," Scott Rye, 
area coordinator for 
residence life, said. 
"This is a new concept 
in student housing I 
don't believe many uni- 
versities are using," Rye 
said. "We knew we 
needed more student 
housing, and we decid- 



ed to'try this since there 
has been such a growth 
in Greek organizations 
at Samford." 
Rye added that one re- 
quirement is that the 
sororities keep the 
house 95 percent full. 
Zeta Tau Alpha has the 
capacity to house 86 
students; Alpha Delta 
Pi, 76 students, and Chi 
Omega, 74 students. 
Each of the three-story 
dorms has a full kitch- 
en, study rooms, a laun- 
dry room, a living room 
and foyer, and a large 
chapter room. Samford 
gave each sorority 



$18,500 to decorate the 
foyer, living room, and 
house director's apart- 
ment. Each sorority was 
responsible for provid- 
ing the money to dec- 
orate the chapter 
rooms, although Sam- 
ford did pay for carpet- 
ing and painting in the 
chapter rooms. 
This new concept in stu- 
dent housing has been 
met with enthusiastic 
approval. And four ad- 
ditonal buildings of this 
type are now under 
construction. 




Andy Ruble 

The members of Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Delta Pi and Chi Omega celebrate the opening of their new houses. 



46 






Home Away From Home 




Zeta Tau Alpha 

The ladles of Zeta Tau Alpha proudly stand in tront of their house on House dedication day. 



47 



Farenfs 
Weekend 




On October 5th and 6th, a record number 
over 450 parents came to visit with their chil- 
dren and "check out" campus life. The week- 
end began with a '60s style dinner featuring 
hamburgers and fries. Later, Dr. Corts ad- 
dressed the past, present, and the future of the 
Univerisity economically and academically. 
During the convocation, Dr. Corts announced 
U.S. News and World Report's selection of 
Samford as the number six regional university in 
the nation. Afterwards, parents and students 
shook it up and slowed it down at the Sock Hop 
held in the Bashnisky Fieldhouse. 

Saturday's activities began with a perfor- 
mance by the BSU Choir in Reid Chapel. Pro- 
fessor Jim Brown introduced the honor pro- 
grams and Provost William Hull summarized the 
prominent points of the University's academic 
future. The parents were then able to talk to the 
professors individually in designated class- 
rooms. 

After the caf experience, the parents and 
students joined the bulldog football team as 
they played the University of Central Florida. 
Immediately following the game, parents were 
invited for food and fun at c cookout on Ben B. 
Brown plaza. To conclude a busy, but enjoy- 
able and informative, weekend the dorms were 
open for a relaxed visitation time. 

Melanle Green 








48 



> 




Dana Glascock(opposite page), chairper- 
son of Parent's Weekend committee, takes 
time out to visit with her mom during the 
football game. 



Linda Coon and her family stretch out after 
the cookout following the football game. 



i 



The Samford Parents' Weekend Brochure 
placed first in its category in the Southern 
Association for College Student Affairs an- 
nual 1990 Publications Competition. 
Dean of Student Affairs Richard H. Franklin 
recognized Dana Glasscock for designing 
the brochure. He also accredited Associ- 
ate Dean of Students Richard E. Traylor and 
Information Services Specialist Mary 
Wimberley for their work with Glasscock on 
the brochure. 

Dean Franklin, Dean Traylor and Director 
of Student Activities Christy Chandler are 
members of SACSA, a professional organ- 
ization for individuals in student affairs 
work in colleges and universities. 

Dean Franklin, who was chairman of the 
contest committee, entered the publica- 
tion in the brochures and fliers category of 
the competition. The Samford Parents' 
Weekend Brochure placed first out of 53 
other entries from schools such as Missis- 
sippi State University, Gilford College, and 
Tulane University. 

According to Franklin, the other catego- 
ries in the competition were judged based 
on a point system, but the brochures and 
fliers category was not. 
"The system was not used as a guideline. 
Instead, judging was initially visual," Dean 
Franklin said. 

He continued to say that after the judges 
narrowed the brochures down by choos- 
ing the ones that caught their attention, 
they then considered the criteria for se- 
lection, which was content, copy, layout, 
aesthetics and creativity. 

SACSA awarded Samford a plaque and 
blue ribbon for winning the brochures and 
fliers category with the Parents' Weekend 
Brochure. 

Celeste Fowler 



Students and Parents team up to 
be-bop to tunes from the 50's in- 
cluding "Tutti Fruitti" and "Earth An- 
gel". 



49 




50 





Russell Nolen prepares kick-off for Mi- 
chael O'Neal. 




Pam Brannon spikes the ball on her op- 
ponent. 




Jenny Cherry and Chris Wilson prepare 
for the Homecoming Game. 



51 



PROVEN WINNERS 



AND 



RECORD BREAKERS 



. 




1st row: Broderlck HIM, Donnle Rory. Rodney Hawkins, Ed Smith, Arthur Ancrum, Head Coach Terry Bowden, Roland Arthourls, Fred Paige, Michael O'Neal, Ryan Perry, Eric Sklpwllh. 2nd row: Ben Wiggins Ray 
Boudreaux. Curt DeLee, led Darby, Lee Frazler, John Palmer, Chad Ingram, Brady Jones, Lee Ellis. 3rd row: Brian James, Scottle McBrayer, Shane Harmon, Damlen Hlnes, Jamie Brown, Reginald Poellnltz, Ricky 
Fields Tim McCool Marcus Durgin, Scott Tate. 4th row: Darrell Murray, Ray Brown, Richard Abernathy, Henry Thomas, Karl Craig, Carlton Golden, Ben Cooley, Theron Owens, Charlie Bradford, Craig Conner. 5th 
row Brlsco December! Chris Brown, Bobby Emerson, David Primus, Jeremy Perkins, Jody Roberts, Johnny Barthel, Brock Dletz, Ryan Lawrence. 6th row: Matt Smith, Mike Rollson, Larry McFarlln, Mike Battles, Chad 
Mobley Terry Chapman Hunter Carroll, Brlster Packer, Ted Dalley, BoBo Locke. 7th row: Aaron Puckett, Eddie Sinclair, Scott Tharpe Terrence Young, Tony Lott, Jermalne Duckworth. Joey Winchester, Rich Simon, 
Vlnce Noblltt Jamie Peterson. 8th row: Patrick Edwards, Ernest Barbee, Xavler Seales. Bobby Alvarez, Chip Money, Wlntred Sims, Chad EAds, Jell Jordan, Ollle Sanders. 9th row: Tory Robblns. Brian Moore, 
Anthony Mitchell, Bryan Fisher, Dominic Fraser. Kevin McElveen, J.C. Roper, Dwayne Moore, Steven Ray. 10th row: Scott Grabe. Charles Buford, Tory James, Russell Nolen, Wyatt Hooks. John Vernon Ed Stokes, 
Chris Sanspree, Derrlc Adams. 11th row: Coaches and Assistants — Tim Richardson, Charles Cooper, Karl Justus, Clint Conque, Mike Howard, Colin Hutto. Jett Bowden, Jlmbo Fisher, Todd Stroud, Bob 
Stlnchomb. Jack Hlnes, Tony lerulll. Chuck Howard, Don Little, Tommy Rohllng. 



52 




A Winning Season 



The reactions of #80, Ollie 
Sanders, reflect Bulldog 
victories in the first full Di- 
vision 1-AA schedule. 



The Bulldogs square off 
against the division 1-AA 
playoff team of Central Flor- 
ida. The score was tied in the 
fourth quarter until a lead- 
taking field goal was missed. 



Opponent 


Score 


Alabama State 


24-24 T 


East Tennessee State 


17-13 W 


Tennessee Tech 


7-21 L 


Austin Peay 


28-9 W 


Central Florida 


16-37 L 


Fayetteville State 


37-10 W 


Morehead State 


25-22 W 


Liberty 


10-37 L 


Catawba 


31-15 W 


Concord 


49-14 W 


Georgia Southern 


24-31 L 




w 



According to Head Coach 
Terry Bowden, the Bull- 
dogs' winning season put 
them "ahead of schedule." 
With a 6-4-1 record, the team 
and coaches proved that 
the Bulldogs ar a team to be 
carefully watched in the 
near future. 

The season opened at Le- 
gion Field against Alabama 
State, who finished second in 
the SWAC. The determined 
Bulldogs came from behind 
to tie the game. 

Next the Bulldogs went 
away to East Tennessee. In 
holding their passing attack 
to 13 points, the Bulldogs 



took the win and showed 
signs of a winning season. 

Again away from home, 
the Bulldogs faced Tennes- 
see Tech. Along with a loss of 
21-7, the team suffered a set- 
back. Quarterback Ted 
Darby injured his ankle. 

At home for the fourth 
game against Austin Peay, 
the Bulldogs found an easy 
victory. 

Despite being the under- 
dog in three more games, 
the Bulldogs showed prog- 
ress. Facing Central Florida, 
the game was tied in the 
fourth. The Bulldogs missed a 
field goal attempt to take 



the lead, and the Knights 
pressed for another touch- 
down and converted two 
turnovers to push the score 
to 37-16. 

The Bulldogs easily defeat- 
ed Fayetteville State at 
home by more than tripling 
the opponent's ten points. In 
the battle at Morehead 
State, the Bulldogs used the 
passing of Darby, as he tied 
the record of 22 completions 
in a game. 

Suffering from a loss of 37- 
10 on the road against Lib- 
erty, the Bulldogs were not 
halted by this defeat. Cataw- 
ba and Concord College 



lost to the Bulldogs in Siebert 
Stadium by scores of 31-15 
and 49-14 in the Bulldogs' 
homegoming game. 

Last of the season was the 
Georgia Southern match — 
the defending national 
champion — in their home 
stadium. In the second half, 
the Bulldogs proved to be 
tough competition for the 
Eagles. Only in the last min- 
ute of the game did Georgia 
Southern score, finishing the 
game 31-24. 

Melanle Green 



53 



Defense 




Senior quarterback Ted Darby added to his passing yardage record by throwing and completing more passes in his career than any other Bulldog. 
The total offense also met their mark with an average of 5.1 yards per play and 345.2 yards per game. 



Bottom left: Brady Jones carries in six of the 37 points scored in the win over Fayetteville State. 
Bottom right: Russell Nolen clears one of the nine unblocked punts he kicked inside the 
opponent's 20-yard line throughout the season. 




V>.^ 






1 


* 


y 


> 


* 


* 


\ 


JL 



■» 



J 




Senior tailback Brady Jones is now the school's 
all-time rushing and scoring leader. He be- 
came the first Bulldog to rush for more than a 
thousand yards. This broke every rushing record 
the Bulldogs keep except for yards in a game, 
including his own single season touchdown 
mark. 

Brady Jones also placed among the nation's 
leaders in both rushing and scoring. The Austin 
Peay game placed him at the top, where he 
finished the season ranked eleventh in rushing 
and fourth in scoring in division 1-AA 
In addition to ranking and records, Brady was 
one of four team captains and was voted one 
of the two overall most valuable team players. 
With 18 touchdowns for the season, Brady Jones 
finished his career with 2, 443 points and 210 
points on 35 touchdowns. 
Melanie Green 



Offense 



Offensive players Mike Battles, Henry Thomas and Bince Noblitt make the plays that held Central Florida to 16 points in the first three quarters. 




Clutching and reaching, free safety Chris Brown and 
strong safety Lee Frazier force a down on the UCF of- 
fensive attempt to advance. 



Bulldog defenders Craig Conner, Lee Frazier, and Bobo Locke catch up with the 
UCF runner, proving the Bulldogs were solid competition for the Knights. 



55 




Members of the Bulldog defense, Ernest Barbee, Ollie Sanders, Xavier Seales, 
and Henry Thomas defy Fayetteville State's offensive forwards, limiting them to 
only two successful scoring efforts. 



Freshman defensive back Karl Craig "blew out" his knee on the opening kickoff 
of the season. This injury required reconstructive surgery and postponed his 
playing time. 



BULLDOG AWARDS 

Kenny Morgan Award — Charles Buford 

Team Captains — Brady Jones, Ted Darby, 

Craig Conner, and Ricky Fields 

Most Improved, Oftense — Chip Money 

Most Improved, Defense — Lee Frazier 

Scout Player, Offense — Eddie Sinclair 

Scout Player, Defense — Rodney Hawkins 

Top Conditioned Athlete, Offense — 

Broderick Hill 

Top Conditioned Athlete, Defense — Bobo 

Locke 

Most Valuable Players: 

Team — Brady Jones and Craig Conner 

Offense — Ted Darby 

Defense — Ricky Fields 

Specialty Team — Johnny Barthel 

Scholastic Award — Pat Edwards 




David Primus and Chris Brown counter UCF movement. This is one of their ninety-two total 
tackles for the season. 



56 



BACKING THE BULLDOGS 






Jack Hines 



Mike Howard 



Terry Bowden 






Coaches 



At 6-4-1 — Proven Win- 
ners. They said we 
couldn't win at a higher 
level....l am totally con- 
sumed by this program. 
I'm also confident we 
can win at a higher lev- 
el." — Head Coach Ter- 
ry Bowden 




Jeff Bowden 



Tony lerulli 



Bob Stinchomb 



Todd Stroud 




Photographic Services 





Andy Ruble 

Top left: Part-time and student coaches: 
(kneeling) Don Little, volunteer asst.; Colin Hutto, 
part-time asst.; Jimbo Fisher, part-time asst.; Tim 
Richardson, student asst.; (standing) Karl Justus, 
part-time asst.; Chuck Howard, student asst.; Clint 
Conque, part-time asst.; Charles Cooper, student 
asst. 

Top right: Bulldolls: (first row)Kellie Johnson, Ra- 
chel French, Melissa Hughes, Susan Furey. (second 
row)Barbara Barker, advisor; Carolyn Wall, Me- 
lanie Green, Deanna Johnson, Charissa Palmer, 
(Catherine Edwards. 

Not pictured: Cindy Kayton, Anita Howell, Mary 
Miek, Pam Dill, Lisa Law. 

Left: Athletic Training Staff: (first row)Robb Hen- 
sarling, Scott Milam, Don Pardue, Larry Landry, 
Charles McKie, Keith Jackson, (second row)Sam 
Huff, Ashleigh Algren, Laura Whitney, Sheri Lobach, 
Heather Hicks, Dara Trotter, (third row)Tommy 
Young, graduate asst.; Ron Courson, asst. trainer; 
Brad Twigg, Andrew Graham, Ed Harris — assoc. 
trainers; Chris Gillespie, head trainer. 

57 



Shooting 
For the Top 



The Bulldogs finished the 
regular season with a record 
of 6-21 overall and 2-12 in 
the TAAC. The team was led 
by Ed McLean, who is in his 
fourth season as head 
coach. 

Ted Allen, a freshman, got 
off to a slow start but came 
on strong as one of the pre- 
mier shot blockers in the 
league. He was second in 
the league, averaging 1.5 
rejections a game with 37 in 






24 games. 

Ernie Williams became an 
integral part of the Bulldogs 
late in the season. He 
scored a career high of 22 
against Alabama State, and 
recorded a pair of double- 
doubles against Liberty and 
Centenary. He was in the top 
15 in rebounding in the 
league for most of the sea- 
son. 

Kevin Moore missed five 
games due to a knee injury. 



John Thomas led the league 
In free throw percentage 
most of the season. 





* 



Kenya Franklin blocks an opponents shot. 



Andy Ruble 



58 




Photographic Services 

Front Row: Tracy Foster, Randy Smith, Ed McLean, David Herman, David Truss, John Thomas, Kenya Franklin, 
Kevin Moore, Rick Spivey, Joel Haskins, and Peter Neuberger. Back Row: Richard Flight, Ernie Williams, 
Olandus Eason, David Mitchell, Matt Wright, Tim Donlon, Ted Allen, Mark Love, Johnny Davis, and Lyle 
Caswell. 



Andy Ruble 



59 



SCOREBOARD 



su 




OPP 


60 


Lamar 


116 


67 


Alabama State 


77 


56 


Clemson 


96 


68 


Air Force 


85 


51 


Rice 


78 


95 


Alabama State 


96 


82 


Florida International 


85 


89 


Central Florida 


80 


49 


Evansville 


76 


71 


Toledo 


68 


50 


Middle Tennessee State 


62 


62 


Liberty 


61 


72 


Mercer 


67 


75 


Georgia State 


85 


53 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


68 


88 


Centenary 


101 


63 


Texas-San Antonio 


106 


71 


Florida International 


59 


70 


Stetson 


80 


75 


Georgia Southern 


72 


55 


Mercer 


61 


59 


Georgia State 


77 


75 


Centenary 


84 


85 


Texas-San Antonio 


99 


80 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


96 


59 


Stetson 


81 


66 


Georgia Southern 


83 




Tim Donlon practices his jump shot. 




Rebound 



Of the 22 games he 
played in, he started in 
19. 

Olandus Eason was a 
starter for most of the 
season. He scored 22 
points and nine re- 
bounds against Central 
Florida. He had a dou- 
ble-double against 
Florida International. 
In the Rocket's Tourna- 
ment, Rick Spivey 
scored 16 points and 
added seven assists to 
upset Toledo. He led 
the Bulldogs in scoring 
against Georgia South- 



John Thomas shoots for a three 
point goal. 



i r 



Tom Donlon came on late 
in the season to become 
one of the top players in 
the league. He ranked in 
the top five in field goal 
shooting. He recorded his 
career high of 24 points 
against Centenary, and 
his career high of 15 re- 
bounds against Alabame 
State. 

John Thomas was the only 
senior on the team. He set 
a career high with 31 
points versus Texas-San 
Antonio at home. He led 
the league in free throw 
percentage most of the 
season, connecting on 
85.4 percent for the sea- 
son. 

David Mitchell came out 
of nowhere this season to 
be one of the nation's 
leaders in 3-point accura- 
cy. He was second in the 
NCAA rankings for most of 
the season. He was the 
first Bulldog to try the new 
three foul shot rule. 



1 




Tim Donlon makes his move toward the goal. 



61 



Ted Allen makes a successful slam dunk. 



VARSITY 
CHEERLEADERS 




Darren Capeheart 

"Go Dogs! Go Dogs!" Chris Wilson, Jenny Cherry and Stephanie Powell lead the crowd during the 
Homecoming game. 




The Varsity Cheer- 
leaders consisted of 13 
well-trained, enthusiastic 
students who cheered 
their teams on to victory. 
Captains Lee Hale and 
Cassie Carlson coached 
the team, as well as add- 
ed leadership to the 
squad. 

The cheerleaders were 
preparing early as they 
went to cheering camp in 
the summer and won the 
most improved squad 
award. 

They put what they 
learned into practice as 
they entertained the 
crowd with their stunts. 

Outstanding cheerlead- 
er awards were given to 
Crysta Daniels and David 
Allen. 

The cheerleaders were 
David Allen, Cassie Carl- 
son, Calvin Cartwright, 
Jenny Cherry, Walter 
Costner, Crysta Daniels, 
Christine Fullman, Lee 
Hale, Jamie Lamb, Shawn 
Lovejoy, Stephanie Pow- 
ell, Emily Scott and Chris 
Wilson. 



Jamie Lamb, Cal Cartwright, Jenny Cherry, 
Chris Wilson, David Allen, Emily Scott, Steph- 
anie Powell, and Lee Hale build a pyramid to 
increase audience spirit. 



Darren Capeheart 



62 



JUNIOR VARSITY 
CHEERLEADERS 




The junior varsity cheering squad made quite a 
change in form this year. 

In years past the JV cheerleaders were more or 
less a girls' dance team. But this year the squad 
moved to stunts. 

One new highlight that helped greatly was the 
addition of men. The squad cheered at minor sports 
and homecoming, as well as worked concessions. 

Lots of long practice hours and hard work went 
into their final product. By the end of the season the 
team was working together in tip-top shape and 
raising the spirit among the fans and the players. 

The cheerleaders were Danny Bernstein, Leslie 
Brewton, Brooke Holbert, Marci Graham, Jenni High- 
lander, Hanz Keclik, Paul King, Nikki Myrick, Stacy 
Sullivan, Kelly Trull, Mike Trull and Paige Waldrop. 



Brooke Holbert, Kelly Trull, Paul King, Mike Trull, Paige Waldrop, 
and Nikki Myrick practice stunts and cheers. 







Jenni Highlander and Kelly Trull 
assist the varsity cheerleaders 
during the Homecoming game. 



Darren Capeheaii 



63 



Second 
Year 



^"* * TTT 



Cooperation between play- 
ers was a crucial part of play- 
ing soccer. Teamwork meant 
points, and points meant win- 
ning. Although they were con- 
sidered a "club", the players 
displayed true team spirit by 
being able to work with oth- 
ers, not just themselves. 
Conditioning was also a cru- 
cial, and grueling, part of 
playing soccer. Conditioning 
consisted of dribbling drills, 
shooting at goals, heading 
drills, sprinting and long- 
distant running. Hard prac- 
tices paid off during hard 
games. 

Kenyon Ross attempts to steal the 
ball. 








Mike White hits the ball off his chest. 



64 



And Running 




David Carter moves the ball toward the 
goal. 



Photographic Services 



Members are: Matt Browning, Mark Da- 
vidson, Mark Brandenburgh, Lester Wil- 
liams, Marshall Brock, Pat Leduc, David 
Fryer, Mike Brown, David Carter, Ryan 
Odle, Kenyon Ross, Robert Cantlay, and 
Greg Henderson. 



65 



II 



MENS AND WOMENS TENNIS 



BOTH CHAMPIONS 



Mens and womens tennis teams 
both won Its respective champion- 
ships. The men took the Trans Amer- 
ica Championship for the school's 
first ever TAAC title. The women won 
the New South Womens's Confer- 
ence Championship for the second 
straight year. 

Sophomore Donavan September 
was named as the leagues "Player 
of the year" after going undefeat- 
ed during the tournament and com- 
piling a 17-3 record at the one po- 
sition for the Bulldogs. Head coach 
Jim Moorgat was named "Coach of 
the Year" Moortgat Is completing 
his fifth season as coach and has 
led Samford to a 47-9 record over 
the past two seasons. 

In the tournament the Bulldogs 
beat Stetson, Texas San-Antonio, 
and Florida International In the title 
match. The Bulldogs finish the sea- 
son with a 22-2 record for the best 
winning percentage in school his- 
tory. The Bulldogs also were unde- 
feated at home this season and did 
not lose a match to a TAAC op- 
ponent. They were 46-3 In all singles 
and doubles matches against 



TAAC foes this season. Overall the 
Bulldogs were 147-35 in singles and 
doubles matches. 

Donavan September was one of 
four players named ALL-TAAC and 
one of the two named for the sec- 
ond time. Joakim Appelqvist was 
named at the number three postion 
after garnering honors at the num- 
ber two spot last season. Andrew 
Batie was named at number two 
and Justin Russell at number six. 
None of the four lost a match to a 
conference opponent this season. 

In doubles play Donavan Sep- 
tember and Joakim Appelqvist 
clinched the title in the TAAC. They 
were named All-TAAC in doubles 
for the second straight year. The 
Bulldogs number three doubles 
team of Marcel Olivares and Ron- 
nie Holmes was also named All- 
TAAC. 

Sophomore Chandra Howard was 
named as the "Player of the Year" 
in the NSWAC for the second 
straight season as the Lady Bull- 
dogs won the top three flights and 
the number one doubles spot for 
New South's final championship. 



Next season the women will be 
competing under the TAAC banner. 

Chandra Howard completed her 
second straight title at number one 
singles and teamed with Brittany 
Haley for the doubles champion- 
ship and a 13-1 mark. Brittany Haley 
ran her record to 18-4 with the 
championship at number two. Brid- 
get Herren was the winner at num- 
ber three spot. 

The lady bulldogs finished the 
season 8-11 overall, but took ad- 
vantage of the NSMAC seeding set 
up to take the title. 

Jesselyn Reed, an all-conference 
performance lasr year at number 
six singles, took secong team all- 
conference honors with her second 
place finish at number four. 

Coach Moortgat stated "It has 
taken us five years to win both titles 
and I give the credit not only to this 
years teams but to all the teams I 
have coached for without them tak- 
ing the small yet important first 
steps our final step would not of 
been possible." 




Tennis teams: (First row) Wendy Fussell, Bridget Herren, Margaret Kay, Jesselyn Reed, Leigh Ann Homesley (Second row) Rob (trainer), 
Ken Koelllng (assistant coach) Justin Russell, Ronnie Holmes, Brittany Haley, Joe Trotter, Chandra Howard, Andrew Batle, Christy Short, 
Donavan September, Joakim Appelqvist, James Callow, Marcel Olivares, Neil Hutchinson and Coach Jim Moortgat. 



66 








Andrew Batie (far left) returns 
the ball with his powerful back- 
hand. 



Margaret Kay uses the forehand 
volley to ease the ball over the 
net. 



. 



All photo* by Andy Ruble 



Wendy Fussell Is slamming the ball over the net 
with her backhand swing. 



Ronnie Holmes scoops up the ball to save the shot and he successfully returns 
the ball. 



67 



VARSITY GOLF 




The women's golf team proved to 
rate well in their six tournaments. Their 
season, which began in the fall, start- 
ed off well with them placing first in 
the Samford Invitational. 

In the spring, they traveled to the 
Mardi Gras Invitational and once 
again placed first. 

Their conference meet was held at 
the University of Central Florida and 
there they took second. 

The team was led by Erika 
Britchford-Steele. But consistency was 
seen throughout the team. 



GoK Team 

Team Members: Gina Weigandt, Erika Britchford-Steele, Amy Williams, 
Sarah Saies, Chris Pattison and Judith Saies. 



68 



CROSS COUNTRY 




lllillfi 









The cross country 
season started in early 
September. Training in- 
volved morning runs 
and afternoon prac- 
tices. But the hard work 
paid off. 

Both the men's and 
women's teams rated 
well at all eight meets. 

The men's team was 
lead by freshmen Juan 
Gautier, Scot McCosh 
and Brad Lance. The 
team placed fifth in the 
conference meet, 
which was held at 
Georgia State. 

The women's team 
was lead by seniors 
Lynette Robbins and 
Cristi Cawood. Lynette 
was All-Conference for 
the third year. She lead 
the team to their third 
place finish in the con- 
ference. 

Both the men's and 
women's teams gave a 
great showing for the 
school at their meets. 



Men's Cross Country: (top) 
Juan Gautier, Scot McCosh, 
Jerre Bush, Lee Joyner and 
Tim Wood. (Not pictured: Brad 
Lance). 



Women's Cross Country: 
Shannon Carter, Heather 
Hicks, Lisa Oliphant, Lynette 
Robbins, Cristi Cawood, Sher- 
ri Boots and Stacy Kingren. 



69 



TRACK AND FIELD — STRIVING 

FOR THE BEST 



This year's track and field team was 
one of the best ever. This is proven by 
the amount of records broken and re- 
broken throughout the season. 

The women claimed 16 new school 
records, broken 21 times. And the men 
claimed 12 records, broken 22 times. 

These runners were put to the test as 
they faced their toughest schedule ever. 
They faced teams such as Auburn, Geor- 
gia and Memphis State. 

The annual Vulcan Relays were held 
at Samford, where the men ranked very 
well. 

Then the team stuck together during 
spring break as they trained for their 
upcoming meets. This strengthened the 
team greatly. 

The coaches' awards were given to 
Lisa Oliphant and Doug Trotter, who 
helped lead the team throughout the 
year. Another outstanding performer 
was Lee Joyner in the half mile. 

The key to the team's success lies in 
Bill McClure's coaching. His experience 
and insight challenged the team to 
strive for the best at all times. 

Lisa Oliphant 



Scott McCosh, top finisher in the Trans American 
Athletic Conference Meet, passes his opponent. 




Andy Ruble 



70 



Rebecca Montgomery overtakes 
an Auburn runner. 




HU 



Photographic Services 



1st Row:Shannon Carter, Jennifer Johnson, Beth Hartley, Jennifer Trettell, Lisa Oliphant, Heather Hicks, Stacy Kingren, 
Lynette Robbins, Cristi Cawood, Tarn Tillman, Kristie Hicks, Sherri Boots. 

2nd Row: Craig Walker, Tim Wood, Juan Gautier, Scot McCosh, Jim Coffman, Jerre Bush, Jeff Archer, Troy Martinez. 
3rd Row: Coach Mike McClure.Lee Joyner, Doug Trotter, Ty Weaver, Jason Daggett, Tony Derriso, Matt Willis. 

Not Pictured: Brand Lance and Rebecca Montgomery. 



71 



TOP DOGS 

Take Tournament 



The Lady Bulldogs softball 
team finished the season 
with a 20-28 record. The sea- 
son was not complete, how- 
ever, until they had won the 
New South Women's Athletic 
Conference tournament. 

The Lady Bulldogs won 
three out of four games in 
the double elimination tour- 
nament hosted by Stetson 
University In Deland, Fla. 
They defeated Florida A&M, 
Stetson and Georgia South- 
ern for the final NSWAC 
championship. 

Pitcher Jennifer Johnson 
was named conference 
Player of the Year. Catcher 
Pam Abernathy Joined John- 
son as a first team All- 
Conference selection. Con- 
nie Waters was named sec- 
ond team All-Conference 
and Beth Myatt received 
Honorable Mention. 

First year head coach Jim 
Nolen was named Coach of 
the Year. He led the Lady 
Bulldogs to their first confer- 
ence championship. 




Andy Ruble 



Jennifer Smith tries to get the first out of the inning. 



72 




Andy Ruble 

Beth Myatt throws another strike. 



Photographic Service* 



Front Row: Samantha Osborne, Connie Waters, Jamie Meador. Second 
Row: Jan Phillips, Beth Myatt, Mamee Jones, Kim Oelschlager. Third Row: 
Jennifer Smith, Annie Belcher, Ginger Hall, Pam Abernathy. Fourth Row: 
Lisa Vickery, Jennifer Johnson. Fifth Row: Jim Nolen, Dara Trotter, Bob 
Pacheco. 



73 



VICTORY FOR VOLLEYBALL 



The volleyball team 
wrapped up their season 
finishing fourth In the New 
South Women's Athletic 
Conference. 

The Lady Bulldogs were 
2-2 In the tournament be- 
hind first team all- 
conference middle 
blocker Kathy Knox. They 
opened the tournament 
by defeating Florida A 
and M. They then fell to 
the champion Florida In- 
ternational before elimi- 
nating Georgia Southern. 
The Lady Bulldogs fell to 
FAMU ending their season 
at 11-25. 

Kathy Knox led the 
team at the net all year. 
She finished the season 
with a .354 attack per- 
centage and averaged 
one block a game. 

Chlkako Irlyama and 
Pam Abernathy both 
turned In honorable men- 
tion performances in the 
tournament. Chlkako 
Irlyama ended her career 
with a .281 attack per- 
centage. 

Erin price led the defen- 
sive effort for the Lady 
Bulldogs with 192 digs on 
the year and only 15 re- 
ception errors. Pam Bran- 
non led the team in ser- 
vice aces with 55. 




Sherri Troxclair blocks the ball that was driven over the net by a Georgia 
Southern team member. 



74 





Kathy Knox (above) spikes the ball with the help of teammate Allison 
Morrow against the South Alabama team. 



Vollybali team members (top 
row)Allison Morrow, Pam Brannon, 
Erin Price, Kelly Jones, Dana Palmer, 
and Kathy Knox, (bottom row) 
Coach Bobo, Molly Neal, Pam 
Abernathy, and Sherri Troxclalr 
cheer at one of the Pep Rallies. 



Katie Sparks backs ups Pam Bran- 
non as she passes the ball to the 
setter. 



75 



Bulldogs Finish 



The baseball team fin- striking out eight 



A pair of four game ed Ed Kinzer, who set a 



ished a season of firsts when 
It finished third in the Trans 
America Conference Tour- 
nament In DeLand, Fla. The 
Bulldogs, which finished the 
season with a 23-26 record, 
lost twice to Florida Interna- 
tional with a win over Cen- 
tenary in between. The win 
over the Gents was the first 
ever in the conference tour- 
nament for the Bulldogs. 

The Bulldogs fell to FIU 6-4 
In the opener and then 
came back to beat Cente- 
nary 8-5. They had 28 hits 
over the first two games. 
However, in the next meet- 
ing against the Golden Pan- 
thers, little went right as the 
Bulldogs fell 10-1. In that 
game Ed Kinzer finished his 
career by pitching five and 
one-third hltless innings and 



Brian Cook was seven-for- 
14 in the tournament to lead 
the Bulldogs though he was 
not named to the all- 
tournament team. Another 
pair of seniors, center field- 
er Chad Ott, and first base- 
man Mike Kash, earned all- 
tournament honors. 

The Bulldogs earned their 
way to the tournament for 
the first time. In 1983, the first 
season baseball was 
brought back to this cam- 
pus, all teams were invited 
to the tournament. The Bull- 
dogs lost their two games. 
This season while playing in 
a new division, however, 
they "Won the West." That 
was a goal that head coach 
Tommy Walker had all sea- 
son. It was the first division 
title for the Bulldogs. 



sweeps at home versus Ar- 
kansas-Little Rock and Cen- 
tenary keyed the Bulldogs ti- 
tle. These were the first time 
that the Bulldogs had ever 
swept a conference oppo- 
nent. 

As a reward for the title, 
six players were named All- 
TAAC representing the West- 
ern Division. The Bulldogs 
had three infielders, first 
baseman Mike Kash (.267, 5 
HR), shortstop Brian Cook 
(.322) and third baseman 
Joe Hutchinson (.301). In the 
outfield, left fielder John 
Dorough (.325, 17 SB) and 
Chad Ott (.330, 13 2B, 17 SB) 
were selected. Jeff Beard (5- 
3, 4.07 ERA) was selected on 
the mound. 

Other notable perfor- 
mances this season includ- 



school record with eight 
saves on the season. Steve 
Levan finished his career 
with 68 appearances and 
was chosen as the top 
scholar on the team with a 
3.85 GPA in the school of 
Pharmacy. Andy Nolen led 
the team in wins with a 6-5 
mark. 

The Bulldogs got off to a 
lighting start, going 10-2 and 
running together a seven 
game win streak. In that 
streak were wins over SEC 
schools, Vanderbilt, Ole 
Miss and Kentucky. Beard 
defeated Vandy on open- 
ing day and through a four- 
hit shutout against the 
Rebels. Billy Chval had the 
game winning hit in the 
tenth inning against Ken- 
tucky. 




Charles Culp refrains from swinging as the ball bounces in the dirt. 



All photos by Andy Ruble 






76 



Season of Firsts 




Brian Cook returns to first base. 



Charles Culp rounds third and 
heads home. 



77 



Diamond Sparkle 



The Bulldogs then made 
their first trip out to Califor- 
nia where they took on Sac- 
ramento State, Cal-Davis 
and Pacific. The most nota- 
ble thing about the trip was 
the loss of Kash to a broken 
hand. He missed 11 games 
in which the Bulldogs had a 
2-9 mark. Kash returned just 
in time to lead the team to 
its sweep of UALR. 

There were your usual ral- 
lies. The Bulldogs scored 
four runs in the botton of the 
ninth to beat Birmingham 
Southern. They scored five in 
the sixth inning to gain the 
first win over Centenary. 
There were rallies by oppo- 



nents also which led to a lit- 
tle bit of "what might have 
been" questions. 

Auburn rallied from a 9-1 
deficit to take a 10-9 win 
with two runs in the bottom 
of the ninth. Two days later 
the Bulldogs got 19 hits 
against perinnial national 
power Mississippi State in 
Starkville. However, the Bull- 
dogs left 15 men on base 
and MSU was able to push a 
run across in the bottom of 
the ninth for a 5-4 win. UAB 
used a three run homer in 
the bottom of the ninth a few 
days later for a 7-5 victory. 
Yes, what might have been. 

Ten seniors were lost from 



this seasons team. All 
played key roles. In addi- 
tion to the ones already 
mentioned, Glen Seay spent 
the season as the number 
two pitcher and picked up 
the win against Centenary in 
the toournament. He fin- 
ished with a 4-3 mark and 
sixth in the league in ERA. 
Marvin Julich had the hit 
which led to the game win- 
ning run in the 13 inning win 
over Sacramento State. 
Steve Hunter batted .286 this 
season. 

The Bulldogs do have a 
solid nucleus coming back. 
Hutchinson, Dorough and 
Beard all return. Catcher Lee 



Gann returns after a solid 
season behind the plate. 
Russell Nolen came over 
from punting for the football 
team and became a solid 
middle reliever and a can- 
didate for the rotation next 
season. Andy Stout had four 
victories. 

For the Bulldogs it was a 
season of successful firsts. 
As Tommy Walker heads into 
his fourth season as head 
coach, the goals will be 
higher. So far the Bulldogs 
have done a pretty good 
job of meeting them. 




Photographic Services 

Front row: John McCleney, Dean Vance, Lee Rafferty, Lee Gann, Marvin Julich, Steve Levan, Steven Hunter, Danny Reed, Brian Cook, Scott 
Marbut, Scott Butler, Andy Stout. Middle row: Head Coach Tommy Walker, Card Steele, Ed Kinzer, John Dorough, Chad Ott, Glen Seay, 
Charles Culp, Joe Hutchinson, John Mullen, Billy Chval, Asst. Coach Ken Roebuck. Back row: ManagerKyle Kaswell, Allen Verlander, Jeff 
Beard, Mike Kash, Dustln Curtlss, Russell Nolen, Jeremy Perkins, Coach Rod Dalton. 






78 




Mike Kash watches closely as the opposing first 
baseman throws the ball to home. 



Andy Ruble 



SCOREBOARD 



su 




OPP 


SU 




OPP 


7 


Vanderbilt 


3 


8 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


4 


2 


Ole Miss 





4 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


3 


2 


Mississippi College 


1 


8 


Birmingham Southern 


7 


3 


Mississippi College 


4 


4 


Livingston 


8 


5 


Alabama-Birmingham 


14 


9 


Auburn 


10 


5 


Kentucky 


4 


4 


Mississippi State 


5 


7 
6 


Faulkner 
Birmingham Southern 



5 


11 



Franklin College 
North Alabama 


3 
5 


8 

6 

13 

11 

2 


Centenary 
Centenary 
Centenary 
Centenary 
Sacramento State 


5 
3 
8 

9 


5 
2 
2 

12 


Alabama-Birmingham 
Centenary 
Centenary 
Faulkner 


7 
4 
4 
6 


2 


Sacramento State 


3 


4 


Alabama 


16 


1 


California-Davis 


5 


5 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


8 


2 


Sacramento State 


6 


13 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


4 


1 


Pacific 


4 


1 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


3 


6 


Sacramento State 


5 


4 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


5 


6 


Alabama State 


5 


3 


Livingston 


5 


1 


Auburn 


6 


8 


Alabama-Birmingham 


4 





Alabama-Birmingham 


17 


10 


LaGrange College 


3 


9 


Tennessee State 


10 


1 


Alabama 


3 


2 


Vanderbilt 


15 


4 


Florida International 


6 


4 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


3 


8 


Centenary 


5 


4 


Arkansas-Little Rock 





1 


Florida International 


10 



79 




Physical activity and 
competition are impor- 
tant parts of a student's 
total college experi- 
ence. The main func- 
tion of the intramural 
program Is to provide 
the students with a 
chance to compete in 
a situation that is phys- 
ically wholesome, 
mentally stimulating, 
and socially sound. It 
created an outlet for 
stressful emotions as 
well as an environment 
that bred lasting friend- 
ships. 

Organizations such as 
fraternities, sororities 



and campus ministries 
participated in the in- 
tramurals program. 
Sports included foot- 
ball, volleyball, basket- 
ball and softball. With 
several different sports 
to choose from, every- 
one had a chance to 
show off his/her talent. 
Although all were there 
to compete and win, 
having fun was the 
main objective. 
The overall intramural 
trophy was won by the 
brothers of Sigma Chi. It 
was not an easy road, 
but the Sigma Chi's 
proved victorious. 



David Carter prepares to 
catch the ball. 



Melanle Wilson (far right) re- 
ceives the pass off. 




80 




(Far Left) Buffy Baron throws a touchdown pass. 




James Rhodes shoots to make the winning basket. 



81 



82 






BSU members David Spray and Carol 
Guthrie are all dressed up for the Safari 
Back to School Party. 




Son Reflectors team member Jeri Parker 
performs to a group of children. 




Stacy Fehlenberg helps set up and clean 
up for the Fall Carnival. 



8c 



CAMPUS 



MINISTRIES 




Mark Brannon 

Executive Council Front Row: Liesl Ward, Ann Chastain, Jim Hitson Second Row: Kristi Whorton, Beth Powell, 
Marta Tyree Third Row: Virginia Bridges, Trisha Miller, Theresa Hawkins, Jud Hendrix Top Row: Eric Spivey, Lee 
Insko 

"Well, It's sorta like an umbrella." This is how people for the last twelve years have described Campus 
Ministries at Samford University. An umbrella. What this term implies is that Campus Ministries is a canopy over 
a whole range of ministries here. The Baptist Student Union, The Ministerial Association, BSU Choir, The Son 
Reflectors Mime and Clowning team, Impact Teams; all of these organizations and more fall under Campus 
Ministries, but each is still its own autonomous group. 

Besides the organizations under the umbrella, Campus Ministries also sponsors many activities, such as 
Christian Emphasis Week, Outreach '91, and Fall Carnival. These activities are planned and coordinated by 
the Executive Council of Campus Ministries. This bady of twelve people, including a President, fall directly 
below the director of Campus Ministries and works at supporting several major emphases throughout the 
year. Summer Missions, Local Missions, World Hunger, Prayer, NET groups, and Worship each are positions held 
by a member of the Council. The Council members are responsible for planning and implementing each area 
of ministry, and for generating interest in the area among students. Campus Ministries is a wide en- 
compassing body here at Samford, but there is always room for one more person to get involved and expand 
their heartbeat to minister to more people. 

Eric Spivey 



84 



One of the areas In which Campus Ministries is in- 
volved on campus is that of worship. The Worship Com- 
mittee helps to plan and organize events such as 
Covenant Worship, Thanksgiving and Easter Commu- 
nion Services, Hanging of the Green, Outreach, and 
Christian Emphasis Week. These services are often de- 
signed for specific situations and needs on campus; 
for instance, this year the focus of Outreach '91 was 
war. The theme for Christian Emphasis Week was 
"Desperately Seeking God." Dr. Bill Self, Dr. John Clay- 
pool, Paul and Nicole Johnson, and Dr. John Killinger 
shared their experiences and ideas of doubt and frus- 
tration and finally faith in the life of a Christian. 

Beth Rowell 




Andy Ruble 

Trish Miller shares during Christian Emphasis Week 






Eric Splvey 



Beth Rowell, helping prepare for Fall Carnival, a yearly 
event held to raise money for Summer Missions. 



Another area in which Campus Ministries is 
reaching out to students is through N.E.T. groups. 
N.E.T., which stands for New Experiences Together 
is a new name for discipleship. Over the past few 
years the name discipleship has taken on many 
meanings. Many people now see discipleship as 
a specific way, or specific methods of helping 
others to grow in their relationship with Christ. 
Some people have the idea that you must be 
trained in discipleship or be some type of super 
Christian to disciple others. N.E.T. groups are de- 
signed to be individualized groups of students 
seeking to grow together in Christ. Students may 
be a part of one of many different groups — the 
one which will most help meet their needs. 

Kristi Whorton and Jud Hendirx 



Ann Carol Mann, current Interim Director of Campus Min- 
istries 



85 




"I thought the 

entire 

program was 

great, But I 

enjoyed the 

presentation 

of the 

ornaments by 

the faculty 

and their 

families 

especially" 

Tiffany Townsend 



ANGING OF 
THE GREEN 



The warmth and merriment of the 
Christmas spirit was contagious at 
the Hanging of the Green. Partici- 
pants were Ted into Reid Chapel by 
the glow of a candle-lit walkway. 

Virtually every element associ- 
ated with the celebration of Christ- 
mas was found in this tranquil at- 
mosphere: including fellowship, 
music, candlelight, greenery, a 
tree and remembrances of Christ's 
birth. 

Each year, a special group of 
seniors are chosen by their peers 
to participate in this ceremony. 
Those who served as honorees this 
year included Beth Rowell, Justin 
Rudd, Jennifer Willis, Scott Thomas, 
Ann Chastain, Kellen Peirce, Me- 
lissa Bailey, Eric Spivey, Roger Bell, 
David McRae, Leisl Ward, Jim Hit- 
son, Susan Sanders, and James 
Smith. 

The sounds of the Bells of Bu- 
chanan signaled the beginning of 
the service, which was narrated by 
Justin Rudd and Beth Rowell. The 
University Chorale and the 
Samford Brass Quintet marked 
each new unfolding of the pro- 
ceedings. 

Four Samford families — the Bas- 
dens, the Shermans, the Baughers, 
and the Bridges — presented 
hand-made ornaments to deco- 
rate the Chrismon tree. 

The ideal culmination of the eve- 
ning's commemoration was the 
candlelight service, in which the 
congregation sang "Joy to the 
World." Everyone left the chapel 
reflecting the faith and harmony of 
the Christmas season. 

Lynn Waldrep 




86 




Hanging of the Green Senior honorees 



Donald McRae 



Andy Ruble 

Masters of Ceremony, Justin Rudd and Beth Powell, present the 
audience with the story of Christmas. 



87 



MISSIONS IN ACTION 



Missions in Action is the area of Campus Ministries 
designed to fulfill the Great Commission found in 
Matthew 28. "For I was hungry. . ." a newly founded 
Food Bank assists in providing food for those who 
are hungry. "For I was in prison. . ." the Family Court 
ministry works with juveniles in a correctional in- 
stitute. "For I was naked. . ." the newly formed Home- 
less ministry provided coats for those without coats. 
"Make disciples. . ." the Ville Crew (inner city min- 
istry) shares with the children and families of 
Loveman's Village the love of Jesus. "For I was 
sick. . ." the Adopt a Grandparent ministry spends 
time with senior citizens at a nursing home. "Sing to 
the Lord. . ." the BSU Choir sings all over sharing 
God's love through song. "Let your light so shine. . ." 
the Son Reflectors share through miming and clown- 
ing to many groups. "Go ye. . ." the Word Players 
travel far to share through drama. "A cheerful 
giver. . ." the Angel Tree project provided over thirty 
gifts for children whose parent(s) are imprisoned. 
There are many other avenues of Missions in Action; 
1990-1991 brought new ministry opportunitites as 
Marta Tyree and Trisha Miller sought the needs of the 

Brimingham community. 

Trisha Miller 



HABITAT FOR 



The Samford Sociological Associ- 
ation, along with Campus Minis- 
tries, sponsor an active group of 
volunteers who work with Habitat 
for Humanity here in Birmingham. 
This program is designed to provide 
homes at an affordable cost to 
those who otherwise would not be 
able to own one. Habitat is an ec- 
umenical Christian housing ministry 
that works in partnership with peo- 
ple in need to build homes. The 
Samford University Chapter works 
closely with the Birmingham affil- 
iate on construction, fundraising, 
and awareness raising activities. 




all photos by Sherl Jackson 

Samford students Scotty Utz, Tori Roberts, and Mary Platz help dig the footings for the foundation of a house. 



HUMANITY 




mwiufaftwfs and civk F rou P s , " ,c lom( f 
n/7/oe sold ivifhouJ profil with no-interest 

loans to selected families m need 



Be Rich in God* works fie Generou and Read) to Share with Others 

I rimothv t) 18 



Samford students (top) work on the roofing at a build-a-thonin 
mid-April 



This sign tells any passers-by who is building the house. This one 
was dried in 24 hours by Birmingham students. 



FAMILY 
COURT 



One of the most overlooked segments of the 
judicial process is the juvenile offender popu- 
lation of the nation. Youth in detention come from 
street gangs, broken homes, and even typical 
middle class families. They have found them- 
selves In tough situations and determined that 
their only way out is through illegal means. The 
Family Court Volunteer Program in cooperation 
with the Youth for Christ organization, offers 
Samford students the opportunity to share their 
time and faith with those youth in the Jetterson 
County Detention center and who are commonly 
labeled "unreachable." The Community is the re- 
ality of life that exists just outside our bubble. 

The Family Court program officialy became a 
part of Campus Ministries this past year. This year 
has proven to be a growing and enriching ex- 
perience for those Involved in the program. Every 
Tuesday night volunteers have played sports in 
the gym of the newly renovated holding center, 
played incredibly outrageous games, put on pro- 
grams of music, speakers, and participated in 
that all time favorite activity of "just hanging 
out." The most important object of these visits is to 
build a foundation of trust that allows volunteers 
and youth to get to know each other on a per- 
sonal basis. Christmas was a very special time in 
which volunteers and kids alike both shared In 
singing, skits, and storytelling. The Importance of 
participation and introspection on the part of the 
youth Is greatly stressed and the occasion of 
Christmas provided an opportune time to do Just 
that. 

Follow-up activity is a very important aspect of 
the program. The biggest problem this segment 
faces is the constant cycle of being in and out of 
the detention center. The Family Court program 
has been in the process of Implementing an ef- 
fective "follow-up" program that enables youth 
who are willing to be connected with churches 
and other civic groups after their release. This 
action can encourage their spiritual growth and 
help them rise above the limitations that are often 
prescribed by the stereotype society places on 
them. 

Glna Odom 



89 




VILLE 



Have you ever seen students 
gathered at Pittman Circle on Sat- 
urday mornings? This group is the 
Samford University Ville Crew (the 
inner-city ministry team). Every Sat- 
urday the team goes to Loveman's 
Village to play games, sing songs, 
and share the love of Jesus with 
children and families who live in 
the village. The children love 
Samford students as shown when 
they climb on them, hug them, or 
even braid their hair. 

The Ville Crew sponsors a Thanks- 
giving Carnival in the fall and Kids' 
Day in the spring. This group also 
has an adopt-a-little brother/sister 
program as well as a program to 
meet the needs (such as food, 
clothing, etc.) of the children. On 
Tuesday mornings the Ville Crew 
prays for the ministry. Students from 
all walks of campus life participate 
the this group. 

Trlsha Miller 




Samford Students, led by Trlsha Miller sing songs and share the love of Jesus with inner-city youngsters. 



90 



CREW 




all photos by Andrea Carter 



91 




You Shall Be 
My Witnesses! 



IMPACT 

Although this ministry began last year, Impact 
Teams really took oft this year. A great core group of 
students found their place of service in this new 
ministry. The purpose of Impact Teams is two-fold. 
One main purpose is outreach into local churches. 
This purpose is achieved through groups of students 
who form a team for each individual church which 
calls. These groups may lead a youth rally or revival, 
host a senior citizen's luncheon, lead in a worship 
service, or provide the church with leadership in any 
other area they may need help with. The second 
purpose Is that of the personal growth experienced 
by team members as they participate or lead 
groups in these different areas of ministry. The group 
shown below is a team which led a youth rally in 
Donalsonville, GA. 

Andrea Carter 




Andrea Carter 



First row: Mark Evans, Catherine Bryan, Krlstl Mellck, Krlsten Larson, Andrea Carter Second Row: Zippy Quick, Paula Hunt, Forrest 
Quattlebaum, Todd Ross Third Row: Renee Hyland, Renee O'Neal Fourth Row: Tom Riley, David Fleming, Andy Hughes 



92 



TEAMS 




Andrea Carter 

Kristen Larson, Kristi Melick, Charlie Lundquist, and Zippy Quick participate in a skit at a Sunday evening service at 
Vestavia Hills Baptist Church. 




Bottom: Mark WePD Second Row: Juan Gautier, Robert Hederman, Renee Hyland, Scott 
McCosh, Carlssa Cole, Kristen Larson Top Row: Charlie Lundquist, Shane Huff, Mark Evans, 
Zippy Quick. Kristi Melick, Jennifer Speights 



93 



BAPTIST 



STUDENT 



This year was a great turning point in the life of the Baptist Student Union at Samford. Not only did the 
organization grow In numbers but the group enjoyed many activities as well. 

Led by President James Smith and the BSU council, the BSU met every Tuesday evening at 9:00 for Breakaway 
in the Dwlght Beeson Hall Auditorium for an hour of fun, fellowship, and a challenging message from various 
speakers. Speakers consisted not only of on-campus personalities such as Dr. Basden and Dr. Vann but also 
ministers from around the Birmingham area such as Rick Ousley, pastor of The Church at Brook Hills and Benny 
Proffitt, minister to youth at Shades Mountain Baptist Church. Once a month, the BSU "broke away" to the 
Fieldhouse for a concert or a time of fun and games. 




1990-1991 Baptist Student Union Council Members Included: Don Macon, James Smith, Leslie Peacock, Daphne Hairston, 
Lisa Stagg, and Natalie Nipper. 



94 



UNION 





Kelly Stedeford, Robert McClurkan, and Kaye Lakeman en- 
joying BSU's Fall Retreat at Twin Pines Conference Center 

James Smith and Natalie Nipper show off their cos- 
tumes at the BSU back to school party. 

The BSU was not just limited to Tuesday nights, however. In November, they had a retreat at Twin Pines 
Conference Center. Second semester brought in a weekend program called Late Night With BSU. On either 
Friday or Saturday night, the BSU had a time of relaxation and fellowship, including a group date, road trip to 
the Steve Camp concert in Cullman, and a retreat to Six Flags over Georgia. While in Atlanta, the group spent 
the night at the recreation center of Dunwoody Baptist Church. Saturday was spent at Six Flags. The BSU ended 
the year with a banquet at Shades Crest Baptist Church. 



95 




Photographic Services 



The highlight of the year for 
BSU was performing its first 
ever Step Sing show. The 
theme of the show was 
"Cleaning up Your Act." Per- 
forming in bright yellow t- 
shirts and painted shorts 
and overalls, the group 
sang such favorites as 
"Yakety-Yak," "Hard Days 
Night," and "Create in Me a 
Clean Heart." Under the di- 
rection of Natalie Nipper, 
the thirty-nine member 
group practiced many hours 
at Raleigh Avenue Baptist 
Church. Thank you to all 
those who participated in 
this year's show. 

Bill Shiell 




Krlsten Larson, Tom Riley, and David Brooks take a break during one of the many, many 
hours of Step Sing rehearsal. 



96 




"BSU is a great service 
for many students, and 
is comprised with 
some of the most solid 
students I know. It de- 
serves more room and 
respect than it gets." 

Zippy Quick 



Leslie Peacock and Rob Johnson 
(right) riding the famous Scream 
Machine at Six Flags over Georgia 
during BSU's overnight adventure to 
Atlanta 



B 




TUDEMT 

union 



97 



BAPTIST STUDENT 




First Row: Carrie Clark, Ann Hauser, Marcia Coyle, Andrea Carter, Carol Christian, Kaye Lakeman, Kathy Fulford Second Row: Leslie 
Peacock, Ruth Ann Simrell, Marcie Hinton, Debbie Fawley, Julie Benton, Angela Calhoun, Ann Marie Collier, Julie Simrell, Kelly Stedeford, 
Kathy McRae, Karen Reid, Kelly Fields, Ginny Sawyer, Dana Funderburg, Dana Davis Third Row: Dan Bell, Brian Waters, Cal Mostella, 
Heather Ellis, Catherine Bryan, Elizabeth Meeks, Melissa Adams, Karen McCutcheon, Becky Camp, Carol Brown, Amy Cheek, Carrie 
Naccaroto, Amarilys Perdomo, Jeri Parker, Paul Lanier, John Green, Eric Spivey Fourth Row: James Brown, Doug Trotter, Jimbo Auchmuty, 
Mark Bates, Scott Thomas, Paul Davis, Bruce Powers, David McRae, Mark Moers, Mike Westveer, David Spray, Daniel Cauble, Todd Ross, 
Brian Randies, Kevin Stringham, John Camp Top Row: Zippy Quick, Mark Newman, Forrest Quattlebaum, Ande Myers, Allan Burton 



As a family of believers joined for ministry and support, the 
Baptist Student Union Choir serves inside and outside the com- 
munity to share the love of Christ. Under the leadership of President 
Scott Thomas and Director Allan Burton, the 1990-91 BSU Choir took 
its message from the mountains of southeast Tennessee at Chat- 
tanooga to the Georgia coast at Savannah. 

Hard work and music, combined with mime, skit, clown and 
puppet ministries were the avenues of sharing used by choir mem- 
bers on two tours and in weekly spring concerts at local churches. 
The 108-member choir also had "prayer and encouragement" and 
evangelism teams. 

Tours proved an important part of the group's ministry as the year 
began and ended. Students had the opportunity to share with 
children at an inner-city carnival in Chattanooga, Tennessee and 
to build houses for the poverty-stricken through Habitat for Hu- 
manity in Savannah, Georgia. 




Andrea Carter 



Forrest Quattlebaum, Choir's 1990-91 accompa- 
nists, takes a break during a warm-up session on 
Main Tour. 



98 



UNION CHOIR 



In addition to tours and concerts and despite the 
time demanded by those commitments, the choir 
also managed to perform an award-winning Step 
Sing show, participate inthe opening of a Samford 
hosted Acteens conference, and sing in more con- 
vos than ever before. 

That work, however, was and is simply viewed as a 
chance to cary out the choir's objective. A song 
chosed for the 1990-91 year revealed BSU Choir's 
purpose in its refrain: 

"We must reach with our hands and 

give with our hearts; 

There is God's work for us to do." 

Carol Gutherle 





(Above) Bruce Powers and Allan Burton entertain a chil- 
dren's Sunday School class on Main Tour. 



Daniel Cauble and Brian Randies perform a skit for inner- 
city youth at the Savannah Baptist Center. 




Eric Splvov 



1990-91 Choir Officers: First Row: Cal Mostella, Allan Burton, David McRae Second Row: Marcia Coyle, Scott Thomas, 
Kelly Stedeford, Mark Moers, David Spray, Stacie Johnston 



9S 




"This year's choir had a 
large number of seni- 
ors, and I'm glad I've 
had the chance over 
the last two and a half 
years to get to know 
them. Each one of them 
holds a special place 
in my heart, and like 
the rest of the choir, 
have helped me learn 
much about life — who 
I am as well as more of 
who God is. Within 
each of them Is a pre- 
cious glimpse of God 
that only they can 
share, and they do It 
well. Choir has been a 
blessing to me, and the 
friends and memories 
I've made there will last 
a lifetime." 

Andrea Carter 



Cal Mostella, Melinda Calloway, and Kevin 
Stringham participate in a group back rub during 
Fall retreat at Cook Springs. 



For the past two years, BSU Choir has had a quartet. 
Matt Cook, Scott Thomas, Mark Moers, and David 
Spray (below) made up the group, which sang at 
Sunday night concerts, on tour, and in some area 
churches. The group sang a song, written by the 
members, called "Someday We'll Never Have To 
Say Goodbye." It has become a favorite of the 
Choir, for it expresses many of the thoughts and 
feelings experienced when friends part. 




Karen Reld 




"BSU Choir is a home 
away from home for 



me." 

Melodi Isbell 



100 




Andrea Carter 



BSU Choir mimes after a performance on Main Tour. First Row: Jerri Parker, Melissa Adams, Amiee, Karen Reid, Beth, Debbie Fawley, Ruth 
Ann Simrell Second Row: Marci Hlnton, Carol Brown, Carrie Clark, Mark Moers, Dan Bell Top Row: Mark Bates, Zippy Quick, David McRae 




B 



S 



One of the four different projects the 
Choir worked on during its Main Tour In 
Savannah was to convert several stor- 
age rooms into rooms for families at a 
homeless shelter. The group tore out 
old shelves, built new ones, scrubbed, 
painted, and served food at the shel- 
ter. Shown to the right are Bruce Pow- 
ers, Leslie Peacock, Ruth Ann Simrell, 
Kelly Stedeford, Daniel Cauble, and 
Matt Cook taking a break after a hard 
day's work. 



u 



Choir 



101 



SON 
REFLECTORS 

Our ministry is to serve others by reflect- 
ing the love of God's son, Jesus Christ. 
By serving as clowns and mimes, we are 
allowed to minister to groups inside the 
church setting and outside the walls of 
religion. Our group consists of students 
who share the desire to tell others about 
Jesus Christ through the unique medium 
of clown and mime. This year we par- 
ticipated in the American Legion Christ- 
mas Party from Ensley, performed on 
stage and marched in the We Love 
Homewood Day Parade, and visited the 
kids from Inner City with the Ville Crew. 



Jeri Parker 





Jerl Parker 

Lisa Stagg, Monica Ikner, and Kathy McRae (top) meet a 
boy scout before the parade begins. 



Marlayne Hunt, Kathy McRae, Hub Harvey, Lisa Stagg, and 
Monica Ikner relax at checkers after the Homewood pa- 
rade. 



102 




WORD 
PLAYERS 

Word Players is a creative min- 
istry team that expresses its 
talents and shares the word of 
God. Under the leadership of 
Sherrle Rothermel, the team 
travels throughout the south 
spreading God's word through 
drama. Members of Word Play- 
ers are: Sherrle Rothermel, 
Scott Tharpe, Autumn Baggett, 
Toni Baggiano, Amy Cheek, 
Wendy Irving, Renee Hyland, 
Tony Hale, Paul Lanier, Christy 
Mason, Doug Ford, Leah Guy, 
Brian, Joe McEachin, and 
Michelle Mohr. 




Andy Ruble 



103 



SPRING BREAK IN 



A desire to serve and love accompanied by many fears and apprehensions brought Samford Students 
together again this Spring Break for a rewarding week in New Orleans. The week was a chance to experience 
a different world, for Jackson Square holds a world of its own. At times, this world was overwhelming and the 
heart would say, "What can I do in a world so much greater than myself?" But the Spirit always gave a gentle 
reminder — "He is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine according to His power which is 
at work in us." (Eph. 3:20-21) 

Those who had experienced the trip before spoke often of Brother Roy with light in their eyes. The others 
waited anxiously to meet this man who was the pastor of the Vieux Carrie Baptist Church. They were soon to 
find that Brother Roy was a man filled with wisdom and joy which he gave freely to all. Some even called him a 
"Dream Maker." He would say, "God loved you enough to create you. Jesus loved you enough to die for you. 
The only way you are going to be happy is if you serve Him." The Good News — simple and true. 

Whether sharing a smile, a song, or a meal, each student stepped out in his own way to give of himself. He 
watched as the bum by the Riverfront became a real man with real feelings. He was blessed as the woman in 
tattered clothes and downcast eyes became a friend to those who sat down beside her. 




Amy Thrash, Judy Perkins, Brother Roy, and Lauri Wade stand with Yon Park, 
a young Korean woman whom they met and befriended during the week. 



104 



NEW ORLEANS 




"If you have done it 
unto the least of 
these, you have 
done it unto me." 
Matt. 25:40 



Part of the annual trip to 
New Orleans includes 
the formation of Family 
Groups. To the left, 
"dad" Mark Busby sits in 
a park beside the Mis- 
sissippi River and chats 
with "son" Zippy Quick. 



Andrea Carter 



Though this was a time for reaching out, 
it was also a time tor coming together. 
Those who had been only faces in the 
Samford crowd became hearts with a 
common purpose. Through prayers, tears, 
and honesty, new friendships were made 
and old ones were strengthened. Smiles 
were given freely and a long day might 
end with a powdered sugar fight at the 
Cafe du Monde. 

The Lord blesses His servants, and those 
returning to Samford went with opened 
eyes, renewed faith, and enlightened 
hearts. 

"When He saw the crowds, He had com- 
passion on them because they were har- 
assed and helpless like sheep without a 
Shepherd. Then He said to His disciples, 
'The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are 
few. Ask the Lord of the harvest to send out 
workers into His harvest field."' Matthew 
9:36-38 
Judy Perkins 



Below several of the group mem- 
bers sit out on the deck at Vieux 
Carrie and practice songs. Music 
has always been an effective way 
for Samford students to meet others 
In this area. 




105 



SUMMER 





Marta Tyree and Kristi Whorton help carve Jack-o-lanterns for the 
annual Fall Carnival, one of the fund-raisers for Summer Missions 



Eric Splvey 



The ten weeks one spends as a 
summer missionary is perhaps 
one of the most life-changing 
experiences any college stu- 
dent could go through. Wheth- 
er one goes to Isreal, Califor- 
nia, China, or Alaska the 
lessons learned are profound 
and can change a student in 
ways one could only imagine. 
Samford sends out one of the 
largest groups of missionaries 
of any college in the United 
States. One may accurately 
picture student missionaries as 
"the salt of the earth" going 
into all corners of the world, 
taking with them the very spe- 
cial message of the love of 
God in Jesus Christ. Whether it 
be through Backyard Bible 
Clubs, Campground Ministries, 
Musical groups, or beginning 
mission churches, these stu- 
dents are out touching our 
world in the way only Chris- 
tians can — with the only ever- 
lasting love. 

Andrea Carter 




Samford students prepare exam care packages to help ra 
Missions 



Andrea Carter 

ise money for Summer 



106 



MISSIONS 




Andrea Carter 



Lisa Stagg, Summer Missionary to Baltimore, Maryland, teaches craft 
time at a neighborhood Backyard Bible School 



107 



MINISTERIAL 
ASSOCIATION 



MA's is a student run or- 
ganization that includes 
people from all different 
majors. Although the ini- 
tials M.A. stand for Minis- 
terial Association, any- 
one who has accepted 
Christ is considered a 
minister, no matter what 
field the student is pursu- 
ing. Over the years MA's 
has taken mission trips, 
gone on retreats, and par- 
ticipated in hunger clean 
up, in addition to holding 
weekly meetings. This 
past year MA's has trav- 
eled to Charleston, S.C. 
for their spring break mis- 
sion trip. They have par- 
ticipated in Step Sing, 
conducted Bible studies, 
and have had a praise 
service both semesters. 

The goal of the MA's is 



to come together as a 
family of Christians and 
worship, lean on each 
other, and grow stronger 
by learning what each 
person's ministry and call- 
ing for Jesus may be. 

Although MA's will 
have disbanded as of the 
end of the year, it has 
been the intent and hope 
of the past that people 
were ministered to and 
that the work of God was 
done through this organ- 
ization. 

Catherine Bryan, Jan Jendrynski, 
Deanna Clark 



Deanna Clark, Catherine Bryan, 
Dawn Tanis, Jennifer Bordenet, 
Alisa Stokes, Brian Smith, Lance 
Metcalf, Dominic Godeury, and 
Michelle Pender tour Charleston 
on the MA spring break mission 
trip. 





Gena Glenn 



Kim SanAngelo, Say Saysombath, David Valle, Amy Box, Deanna Clark, Michelle 
Pender, Chip Vann, Matt Mitchell, Dominic Gadoury, Becky Vann, Catherine Bryan, 
and Jan Jendrynski show their Step Sing spirit. 



Nora Graybeal 

Jan Jendrynski, Michelle Pender, Deanna Clark, Jennifer 
Bordent and Catherine Bryan spend quality time together 
at Spring Retreat 



108 



CHURCH 






Owen Mc Allster 

Brian Smith, Lance Metcalf , Jennifer 
Bordenet, Alisa Stokes, Dawn Tanis , 
Michelle Pender, David McAlister, 
Catherine Bryan, Deanna Clark, 
and Dominic Gadoury visit First 
Baptist In Charleston during mission 
trip. 

Kelly Rogers, Jennifer Bordenet, 
Dominic Gadoury, Deanna Clark, 
Jan Jendrynski, Alisa Stokes, 
Catherine Bryan, Michelle 
Pender, and Gena Glenn relax at 
the after Step Sing party. 



Tina Williams 



109 



Ginny Bridges 




On Saturday, April sixth of this year at Ves- 
tavia Hills Baptist Church, Virginia Bridges be- 
came Mrs. Bill Ireland. Those who were there 
know how very special and beautiful this day 
was. 

As Director of Campus Ministries for ten 
years, Miss Bridges didn't run a "program," 
but ministered to students In her daily en- 
counters with them. The students who sought 
her counsel and others who served on com- 
mittees and ministry teams were nurtured by 
her in their lives' pilgrimages. She accepted 
the uniquenesses of persons — not asking 
them to fit a particular mold. Ginny's vision 
led the Samford community to lead the na- 
tion in student summer missions. She chal- 
lenged us to reach beyond the Samford bub- 
ble to encounter a world of diverse cultures 
and ideas. 



Glnny helped us enter new stages in faith through 
the Freshman Council. Her method of teaching in 
these Councils enabled students to express "a-ha 
moments" in which they discovered truths about 
who they really are and who God is. 

One of Ginny's many responsibilities here at 
Samford included the Hanging of the Green, held in 
Reld Chapel each Christmas. She began this cel- 
ebration during her first years here, and it has grown 
to become an annual tradition which many students 
look forward to each year. 




Ms. Bridges with a Freshman Council group 




Ms. Bridges talking with students Hope Haslam and Jay 
Straughn outside her office 



110 




Those students who worked closely with 
Ginny will never forget the influence which 
she has had in our lives. Each of us, along 
with the rest of the Samford Community, 
wish her and her new husband all the hap- 
piness and blessings which life could pos- 
sibly give to them. Our thoughts and 
prayers go with them as they begin their 
new life together. 




Miss Bridges with a group of Senior 
Honorees at the Hanging of the Green 



Mr. and Mrs. William Ireland, Jr. 



111 



AcoiMf* 



a uriwevs^ 



«*& 





M&SS& 



112 





John Brewer listens attentively as the 
question is being read to his college 
bowl team. 




Miss White demonstrates to Missy Gree- 
noe the stroke pattern of the sky In her 
painting. 




Dean Franklin presents Andy Ruble the 
award of "Most Outstanding Crimson 
Member" at Honors Day. 



Man Behind 

the Scenes 



Dr. Thomas E. Corts is a grad- 
uate of Georgetown College, 
from which he recently re- 
ceived an honorary degree. 
He holds a Masters and a Ph.D. 
degrees from Indiana Univer- 
sity. 

As president, Dr. Corts heads 
Alabama's largest privately 
supported institution of higher 
learning. His accomplishments 
include the following: serving 
on the Board of Directors for 
Leadership Birmingham since 



1984; president of the national 
Fellowship for Baptist Educa- 
tors, 1988; President of the As- 
sociation of Southern Baptist 
Colleges and schools and 
membership in the American 
Association of Presidents of In- 
dependent Colleges and Uni- 
versities. 

He and his wife, Maria, are 
the parents of two daughters, 
both graduates of Samford, 
and one son who is currently a 

Student. Lynn Waldrep 




Leslie S. Wright, Chancellor. 
A.B., M.A., University of Louis- 
ville; LL.D., Auburn University; 
LL.D. University of Alabama; 
Ped. D., Univesity of Louisville; 
L.H.D., Samford Univesity 



William E. Hull, Provost. B.A., 
Samford University; M. Div., 
Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary. 



Robert T. David, Vice Presi- 
dent/Dean, School of Business 
B.S., M.B.A., Harvard University 



114 




The People 

That Make 
It Happen 

Gerald A. Macon, Vice President for Business Affairs A.A., Wingate 
College; B.S., B.A., Univerisity of North Carolina 



Richard Franklin, (far left) Vice President 
and Dean of Students. A.A., Anderson 
College; B.A., Furman University; M. Div., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Ed. D., University of South Carolina. 



Wesley M. Pattillo, Vice President for Uni- 
versity Relations B.A., University of Geor- 
gia; M.A., Ohio State University 



Parham Williams, Jr. (far left) Vice Pres- 
ident and Dean, Cumberland School of 
Law A.B.J.D., University of Mississippi; 
L.L.M., Yale University 



Roderick Davis, Dean of Arts and Sci- 
ences, B.A., Samford University; M.A., 
Boston Univerisity; M. Div., Yale Univer- 
isity; Ph.D. "with distinction", Columbia 
University; 



115 



Marion Baur Dean, Ida V. Moffett School of 
Nursing B.S.N., Emory University; M.S.N., 
Univerisity of Alabama at Birmingham; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College for Teachers of 
Vanderbilt Univerisity 



L. Gene Black, (far right) Dean, School of 
Music B.S. Samford University; M.A., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 



Martha Ann Cox, Dean of Academic Services 
A.B., Samford University; M.A., University of 
Alabama 



Timothy George, (far right) Dean, Beeson 
School of Divinity B.A., University of Tennes- 
see-Chattanooga; M.Div., Harvard Divinity 
School; Ph.D. Harvard University. 



Joseph Dean Dean, School of Pharmacy 



Julian Prince, (far right) Dean Orlean Bullard 
Beeson School of Education B.S., Millsaps 
College; M.Ed., Emory University; Ed. 
D., University of Mississippi 




116 



FACULTY 
AND 



STAFF 




Timothy Banks 

Amanda Borden 

Jimmy Bowling 

Virginia Bridges 



Otis Brooks 

Margaret Brodnax 

Jim Brown 

Sigurd Bryan 



Lee Carmon 

Selina Carter 

Jan Case 

Kristie Chandler 



Colquitt Clark 

Jon Clemmensen 

Ann Creasman 

David Downing 



117 



Tina Duffey 
Julia Hixson 
Jetson Davis 
Ann Godfrey 



Calvin Howard 
Faye Howell 
Mary Hudson 
Vickie Jones 



Linda Martin 

Suzanne Martin 

Barbara Olson 

Eric Olson 



Roger Parker 

Constance Pedoto 

Morgan Ponder 

Angela Prater 



Scott Rye 

Janice Teal 

Rick Traylor 

Donald Wilson 




118 



BUCHANAN 
AWARD 

Faculty Excellence 



The John H. Buchanan Award for excel- 
lence in classroom teaching is presented 
annually to recognize the faculty member 
who exemplifies the best in classroom 
teaching. The honoree is chosen by a poll 
of the previous spring's graduating seni- 
ors. He is presented with a silver tray and a 
$1,000 cash prize. 

Dr. Jennings B. Marshall, the winner of the 
1990 Buchanan Award has been a faculty 



member since 1985 and a professor of Eco- 
nomics. Dr. Marshall holds a B.A. from Ken- 
tucky Southern College and M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees form the University of Kentucky. 

Prior to joining the faculty, Dr. Marshall 
taught at Tennessee Technological Univer- 
sity, where he was also recognized with 
two outstanding faculty member 

awards. Lynn Waldrep 




Andy Ruble 



William Hull, Provost, presents Dr. Jennings Marshall with the Buchanan Award. 



119 



HONORS DAY 



While mothers and fathers cried 
joyously and friends cheered wild- 
ly, several of Samford's students 
were recognized for their academ- 
ic and service achievements on 
campus at the fourth annual Honors 
Day held on April 25. 

Welcomed to the ceremony by 
Provost Hull and led in prayer by 
Paul Basden, University Minister, the 
attention of the people attending 
was captivated by Dr. Marlene 
Rikard with her excellent address in 
which she compared two women 
and how they changed the world in 
which they lived. 

Following these formalities, all 
students who made the Dean's List 
were presented by class (Cum 
Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and 
Summa Cum Laude). 

Those receiving awards in their 
respective departments were also 
asked to stand in recognition. 

Sweeping the Interfraternity 
Awards category, Sigma Chi re- 
ceived Outstanding Fraternity, 
Pledge Award, Chapter Award and 



All Sports Award. The Pledge Award 
and Chapter Award are given to 
the fraternity with the highest grade 
point average in their pledge class 
and brotherhood. 

Alpha Delta Pi took both Panhel- 
lenic Awards, Pledge class and 
Chapter Award, reflecting their 
GPA's as well. 

Found outstanding in the field of 
communications, Celeste Fowler, 
Andy Ruble, and James Hamil were 
awarded Outstanding Entre Nous 
Staff Member, Outstanding Crimson 
Staff Member and Outstanding WV- 
SU Staff Member for their hard work 
and devotion to these student run 
organizations. 

The Gail Hyde Memorial Award 
was presented to Mandy Newman 
in recognition of her outstanding 
Christian character. And David 
Gainey received the John C. 
Pittman Award for achievement 
and service. 

The Student Government Associ- 
ation voted Sheri Jackson and An- 
drew White the recipients of the Ru- 



fus W. Shelton Community Service 
Award in honor of the class of 1932. 
The Hypatia Cup Award was given 
to Mary McGinnis Platz who also re- 
cieved the Service Awrd. 

Finally Bruce Powers and Marsha 
Fuller were nominated to get the 
Luke 2:52 Award, which is given to 
the male and female who most ex- 
emplify the verse. 

Scholarship Awards were given to 
Bethann Ouslander for Alpha Lamb- 
da Delta, Ruth Catherine Duvall for 
Hypatia, Lewis Compton and Dee 
Fowler for Phi Eta Sigma. 

Eugenia Glenn, John Brewer and 
Michael Oliver were chosen to 
compete for the H.S. Truman Schol- 
arship Award which is a national 
competition open to students go- 
ing into government work. 

The two highest recognition 
awards were presented to Philip 
Mahler and Beth Rowell who re- 
ceived the John R. Mott Award and 
the James M. Sizemore Award for 
service and scholarship. 

Tiffany Townsend 




Andy Ruble 



Jim Hamil receives Most Outstanding WVSU Award from Dean Franklin. 



120 



CONVOCATION 




Faculty and staff listen attentively to Provost Hull at Honors Day. 



121 



WHO'S 






• 




JENNIFER 
SMITH 



JOHN 
BREWER 



TINA 
CARGILE 




CHRISTA 
CAMP 





ROGER 
BELL 





JEFF 
JACKSON 



122 



WHO 




123 



WHO'S 




TOM 
BRISCOE 



GARY 
BULLOCK 




SARA 
BRYAN 




TAMMY 
BURKE 




JANET 
EVANS 



124 



WHO 




LAUREN 
FIELDS 



HONEY 
GILMORE 



SHIJUANA 
HUDSON 



WILLIAM 
FOWLER 




NATALIE 
HERNANDEZ 




SHERI 
JACKSON 



125 



WHO'S 




RICH 
JOHNSON 



SHERRY 

ROTHERMEL 



ROBERT 
NELSON 




JENNIFER 
SCHINMAN 




DIANNE 
SHOEMAKE 



JAMES 
SMITH 



126 



WHO 




■VELYN 
BUCHANAN 




DAVID 
WILLIAMSON 




JENNIFER 
SMITH 




SARA 
THOMAS 



127 



RESIDENCE LIFE STAFF 



What do students do 
when things go wrong 
in their rooms? Well the 
answer is at the end of 
the hall. The Residence 
assistants or better 
known as the RA's are 
there to respond to any 
problem. They help the 
students check in and 
out of their rooms and 
they are there all the 
times in between if they 
are needed. They 
check your rooms pe- 
riodically and enforce 
all "quiet hour" laws. 
They can be your friend 



or foe but most choose 
to be your friend. They 
are in charge of plan- 
ning monthly hall pro- 
grams which enhances 
the friendships of the 
halls. They have been 
known to have Johnny 
Ray's barbeque or a 
combined hall party 
with the other halls at 
the park. You can never 
underestimate the RA 
because they are usu- 
ally on top of things 
even when you don't 

Want them tO be. Donna Kern 




Residence life staff: (First row) Ly Llm, Nancy Helton, Amy Johnson, Susan Waters, Beth Nelson, Debbie Ganey, Karen Romine, Angle Vineyard, Nandra 
Perry, Klmberly Rhodes, Ann Creasman, Doug Helms, Jud Hendrix, David Cunningham, Russ Clemmons, Dan Butchfield. (Second row) Shannon 
Pennington, Jana Rankin, Jennifer Davis, Carolyn Johnson, Krlstina Colwell, Jennifer Willis, Theresa Hawkins, Ann Chastain, Stacle Johnston, Mellisa 
Adams, Beverlly Moyer, Heather Haglns, Kerry Watkins, Monte Starkes, Ande Underwood, Billy Spivey. (Third row) Jennifer Schlnman, Jennifer Sayle, 
Tiffanl Knight, Steve Jones, Kathy Hartrick, Susan Waters, Marcia Cole, Gina Odom, Jon VanDyk, Lori Phillips, Stephanie Neill, Eric Hube, Lee Insko, Dean 
Smedley, Clint Chapman, Tray Lovvorn, Rob Skeiton. (Fourth row) Carla Camp, Paige Pepper, Rebecca McKinney, Jet Davis, Angela Prater, Beth Fields, 
Dawn Tanls, Lisa Dwigglns, Justin Rudd, Charles Leonard, Jim Hltson, Rick Chancey, Michael Whisenant, David Abee, Chris Blazer, Coke Clark, and Scott 
Rye. 



128 



FROM A 

DISTANCE THE 

WORLD LOOKS 

BLUE AND 
I GREEN 
THERE ARE NO 
GUNS AND NO 



WAR. 






129 

Newsweek 



August 3rd 



President Bush be- 
gan to form a 38 
nation coalition 
to oppose Iraq, 
U.S. commanders 
deployed the 
largest concen- 
tration of military 
might since World 
War Two. The stra- 
tegic objective 
was to force Sad- 
dam out of Ku- 
wait, and to de- 
fuse his army as a 
threat to the re- 
gion and his 
chemical and bi- 



ological weapons 
as a threat to 
everyone. Five 
priorities guided 
them: to destroy 
Saddam's com- 
mand and control 
network; to blind 
his radar and SAM 
anti-aircraft mis- 
siles while 
grounding his AIR 
Force; to ravage 
the factories, de- 
pots and labs un- 
dergirding his 
Army; to wreck his 
airfields and 



ports, highways 
and bridges, and 
to humble his top 
troops, the Re- 
publican Guard. 
By late fall, the 
first draft of the air 
compaign had 
been produced. 
The targets were 
divided into four 
broadly overlap- 
ping phases. 
Phase 1: The stra- 
tegic phase — 
cruise missiles, 
Stealth bombers 
would knock out 




Spc, Underwood, James A 2 
109th Evac. Hospital 
Operation Desert Storm 
APO, New York, 09657-0006 

In National Guard 
Junior — Psychology 
D.O.B. — September 8, 1969 



Andy Underwood and Mike Anderson are 
two of the first Samford students to be trans- 
ported to Saudi Arabia. 



130 




targets like tele- 
phone ex- 
changes, com- 
mand and control 
nodes. Phase 2: 
Demolish enemy 
air defenses, in- 
cluding airfields, 
SAM systems and 
early warning ra- 
dars. Phase 3: Cut 
Saddam's military 
supply lines to the 



Troops in Saudi Arabia stand with a 
sign sent to them by the Athletic De- 
partment. 



south, isolate and visions but by the 

savage his Re- end of December 

publican Guard the plan was vir- 

and regular tually complete. 

troops hunkered 

down in Kuwait. 

Phase 4: Planes 

would move in to 

provide close 

support for a 

ground invasion. 

The plan went 

through many re- 



Cpl. Anderson, Michael David 
5th Platoon 
2nd Force Recon. Co. 
Operation Desert Storm 
FPO, New York, 09502-0231 

Marines 
First Year Law 
D.O.B.- March 30, 1967 



131 



January 9: 



Secretary of State 
James Baker hand- 
ed Iraqi Foreign Min- 
ister a letter from 
George Bush warn- 
ing Saddam Hussein 
to get out of Kuwait 
by January 15 or 
face the certainty 
that the 28-nation 
coalition would 
force him out. When 
the talks ended 61/2 
hours later a senior 
member of the 
American team de- 
cided that Saddam 
had neve« intended 
the meeting to have 
any chance of suc- 
cess. "These guys 
had not come to 
make a deal," he 
says. "War is inevita- 
ble." Soon after the 
session ended, 
Barzan, Saddam's 



half brother, called 
Bagdad. The Ameri- 
cans don't want to 
fight, he told Sad- 
dam. They want to 
talk their way out. 
They are weak. It 
was a fateful mis- 
judgment. In the 
meeting at the White 
House that Sunday, 
Bush and advisors 
chose the hour to 
strike: 2:30 a.m., Jan- 
uary 17, Baghdad 
time. 








SjWpAMrORD "F> 


W OPERATION 


> 
11 




A I 

1 


1 


1 


* 


1 ■ \j 


ii a 




^ 


M 





'*>*l 



Ml IV INVOLVED IN 
DESERT STORM 



* hh 



*• 



A board in the student center show Samford's support for the troops. 



132 




As the soldiers leave for war the loved 
ones are left grieving behind. 



POWs: Guaging the Human Cost 

Should President Bush order attacks on Iraqi positions even 
if U.S. or allied POWs are being held at those positions? 

62% Yes 21% No 

Should President Bush order missions to rescue POWs in 
Iraq, even if it means additional risk for the POWs and those 
trying to rescue them? 

53% Yes 32% No 

From the Newsweek Poll ol Jan 24 25. 1991 




The addresses of the Desert Storm soldiers were posted on a board in the student 
center. 



133 



January 15: 



Deadline for War. On 
the evening of Jan. 16, 
maps with the coordi- 
nates of Kuwait and 
Iraq flashed on the 
screens. A thousand 
fighters and bombers 
were closing in on 
their targets. The 
planes appeared on 
the screens as tiny, 
blinking dots. "Time 
kind of stood still as 
you saw those little 
dots moving towards 
Iraq," remembers one 
Navy air liaison offi- 
cer. The greatest air 
armada in history was 
heading for Saddam 
Hussein. Fearing that a 
frontal assault on 
heavily dug-in Iraqi 
defenders could lead 
to thousands of allied 
casualties, 
Schwarzkopf 
launched the flanking 
maneuver he would 
later compare to the 
Hail Mary play. 
Schwarzkopf did not 
find it easy to sell the 



How much longer do you think 
the war against Iraq will last? 



Less than 2 weeks 
2 to 4 weeks 
1 to 3 months 
4 to 6 months 
6 months to a year 
More than a year 



1% 

4% 

24% 

25% 

22% 

12% 



From a telephone poll of 1000 American adults taken for TIME/ CNN on Jan. 24. 



One of the postcards sent 
by the soldiers in the Per- 
sian Gulf. 

134 




*-■* 



*; 



i / . » 




The sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha sent a sign over to the Gulf to show their support. 



Col. Kern, James Edward, USMC 

Headquarters 

4th Battalion, 14th Marines 

MCAGCC 

Twenty-nine Palms, Ca, 92278-5090 

Marines, serves in communications 
Senior — Accounting 
D.O.B. July 22, 1968 " 



135 



idea. Skeptical com- 
manders argued that 
more than 150,000 sol- 
diers could not be 
moved that far that 
fast, with all their ar- 
mor, artillery, and 60 
days of ammunition 
and supplies, over a 
desert with only rudi- 
mentary roads. 
Schwarzkopf rea- 
soned that if his sub- 
ordinates doubted it 



could be done, Sad- 
dam's generals would 
be quite certain that 
such a move would 
be impossible and, 
lacking any aerial re- 
connaissance to indi- 
cate it was actually 
under way would 
leave "this big, open 
flank" largely unde- 
fended. He was right. 



One of the soldiers has his 
gear Inspected for battle. 




War Rim: Saddam Out 

Rt what point do you think the 
United States should stop military 
action against Iraq? 

107* After Iraqi military capability 

is destroyed 

257* After Iraqi forces actually 

leaue Kuwait 

477* Only after Saddam Hussein's 

youernrnent is remoued from 

power in Iraq 

From the Newsweek poll of Jan. 24-25, 1991 



136 



DATABASE 

Patriot missiles fired in gulf war: about 30 

Cost per missile: $1.11 million 

Cruise missiles fired: about 260 

Cost per missile: $1.35 million 

Daily cost to supply U.S. troops with food: $4.5 million 

Medicine: $2.4 million 

Clothing: $4.2 million 

Bottles of water-purification tablets bought for troops: 

616,296 

Tubes of lip balm: 2.4 million 

Cans of foot powder: 731,165 

Average pieces of mail delivered daily to U.S. troops: 

1.5 million 

Normal low temperature for northern Saudi Arabia: 45 F 

Cold weather undershirts ordered: 994,000 

Cost: 10.30 each 



Cpl. Fort, Eric Parker, USMC 

Headquarters 

4th Battalin, 14th Marines 

Area Base 43 

Camp Pendleton, Ca. 92055 

Marines, serves In Administration 
Sophomore — Marketing 
D.O.B. July 6, 1968 



137 



January 
31: 

Khafji was already a ghost 
town when a sudden Iraqi 
thrust made it the site of 
the first large ground bat- 
tle of the war. Six miles 
south of the Saudi border 
with Kuwait, the town had 
been abandoned two 
weeks earlier by residents 
who fled out of military 
fire. On Tuesday, January 
29, nine brigades of Iraq's 
5th Mechanized Division 
swept into Saudi Arabia. 
By the following night they 
occupied the town. Sup- 
ported by U.S. air and ar- 
tillery attacks, troops from 
Saudi Arabia and Qatar 
retook Khafji the next day 
after 12 hours of fighting. 
If Saddam had intended 
the raid to lure allied 
troops into a ground war 
before they were ready, 
he failed. Not only did 
troops from Saudi Arabia, 
Qatar and the U.S. repel 
the invaders, but Sad- 
dam's ploy actually con- 
tributed to the success of 
the allied ground offen- 




A proud father kisses his newborn son as he arrives at the base. 



Cpl. James, Patrick F. USMC 

Headquarters 

4th Battalion, 14th Marines 

Area Base 43 

Camp Pendleton, Ca, 90255 

Marines — serves In Flredlrection com- 
pany 

Junior Accounting 
D.O.B. September 6, 1968 



Cpl. Jackson, Jeff Duane, USMC 

Headquarters 

4th Battalion, 14th Marines 

Area Base 43 

Camp Pendlerton, Ca, 92055 

Marines, serves in Motor transport 
Senior — English/Histoty 
D.O.B. October 28, 1967 



138 





sive. The battle 
provided U.S. mil- 
itary planners with 
their first opportu- 
nity to see how 
Iraq's troops oper- 
ated against 
American mobile 
tactics. The Iraqis 
performed badly, 
surrendering en 
masse when the 
Marines counter- 
attacked. "They 
showed us they 
couldn't handle 
combined opera- 
tions," says a pen- 
tagon official. 
"They maneu- 
vered but couldn't 
work effectively 
as a unit." As Gen- 
eral Schwarzkopf 
put it, "Khafji led 
us to believe that 
we were really go- 
ing to kick this 
guy's tail." 



The soldiers do their daily chores in 
the desert. 

Soldiers receive a poster sent by 
the Varsity Cheerleaders to wish 
them a Merry Christmas. 



REVOLUTIONARY 
WEAPONS 

STEALTH PLANES: A Combination of design and materials 
(mainly graphite composites) makes manned flights invisible 
to enemy radar. Already used in the F-117A fighter and the 
B-2 bomber ; planned for the Advanced Tactical Fighter. 

ATACMS: The Army's tactical missile system can fire 75 miles. 
Could be loaded with smart bombs to seek out individual 
tanks. 

VIRTUAL REALITY HELMETS: The Air Force is experimenting 
with headgear that would project images of the battlefield 
for a pilot, with a yellow path leading to the target. 



139 



February 
11: 

When Israeli Defense 
Minister Moshe Arens ar- 
rived in Washington for 
a crucial White House 
meeting, Israel had 
withstood 11 attacks by 
Iraqi Scuds. Some had 
been shot down by the 
Patriot Missiles that U.S. 
had rushed to Israel af- 
ter the first attack on 
January 17. But a num- 
ber had hit home, leav- 
ing four dead and 98 
wounded. Though the 
restless Israelis had ac- 
ceded to Washington's 
pleas not to retaliate, 
the continuing threat of 
Scud attacks and fear 
of chemical warheads 
had stretched Jerusa- 
lem's patience to the 
limit. Arens proposed a 
U.S. and Israel com- 
bined attack in Iraq. 
Bush was sympathetic 
but refused to go along 
with the plan, and cau- 
tioned Israel against 
taking any action on its 




Soldiers (top) prepare to go through a dally drill. 

n the Persian Gulf a poster to brighten 



Panhellenic sent the soldiers 
their day. 



The U.S military is censoring reports 
coming out of the Middle East. Do you 
think it is wrong, or do you think 
censorship is nessary under the 
circumstances? 



Wrong to censor reports 
Censorship is necessary 



9% 
88% 



Despite this censorship, do you 
think you are getting enough 
information about the war? 



Enough information 
Not enough information 



79% 
19% 



Time leb 4. 1991 



140 





U.S. soldiers saw unusual sights In Kuwait, such as camels. 



Soldiers in Persian Gulf had to keep drilling 
each day to prepare for war. 



own. His reasoning: even in 
the midst of the ground war, 
an Israeli move against Iraq 
could split apart the allied 
coalition and enormously 
complicate battle plans. Is- 
rael's best deterrence, he ar- 
gued, was to be a close ally 
of the foremost world power. 
But Arens did not leave emp- 
ty-handed; shortly afterward, 
the U.S. increased its Scud- 
bursting air sorties against 
Iraq. 



Harrison, Thomas Franklin, USMC 

Headquarters 

4th Battalion, 14th Marines 

Area Base 43 

Camp Pendleton, Ca, 92055 



Marine 

Freshman 

D.O.B. July 30, 1970 



Spc. Fanin, Greg 
715th Maintenance 
2nd A.S.B. 

Operation Desert Storm 
APO, New York, 09772 



National Guard 
Freshman — Undecided 
D.O.B. May 29, 1965 



141 



February 

27: 



That afternoon at 2:30 Bush 

gathered his war cabinet in the 
val Office. "I want to stop the 
killing," he told them. After 
Bush consulted by phone with 
Schwarzkopf in Riyadh, the 
group agreed on midnight as 
the hour for cease-fire. Though 
Bush had known for more than 
a day that the war was drawing 
to a quick conclusion, it re- 
quired a change of heart for 
him finally to call off the fight- 
ing. Just two days earlier, after 
Bagdad radio announced that 
the Iraqi leadership had or- 
dered a withdrawal, the Pres- 
ident and his advisers had de- 
cided to keep the pressure on: 
no peace, the White House 
would declare, until Saddam 
"publicly and personally" 
agreed to the terms of the U.S. 
ultimatum outlined the previ- 
ous weekend. By humbling the 
Iraqi leader Bush hoped to cir- 
cumvent any prospect that 
Saddam might pluck political 
triumph from military defeat. 
"Bush was asking him to get 
down on his knees," says pres- 
idential aide. "None of this 
face-saving stuff." By midday 
on Wednesday, however, allied 
forces were routing the Iraqis 
so thoroughly that U.S. military 
leaders could tell the President 
that field commanders were 
running out of things to shoot 
at. "The Iraqis had a choice: an 
easy peace or a hard peace." 




-* , 



Newsweek 

A soldiers family welcomes him home after a long stay in the Gulf. 



WAR DATA 



The Human 

Cost 

52,000 troops 

served in 

Operation 

Desert Storm. 

184 troops 

were killed. 

4,400 

Americans 

killed in motor 

vehicle 



accidents 
from Jan. 16 
through Feb. 

27. 
52 U.S. POW's 

/MIA's 
$ 40 billion- 
total cost 
$13.3 billion- 
cost of air war 
141,921 tons- 
bombs 



Lt. Traylor, Jennifer C 
1702nd Contigency Hospital 
Operation Desert Storm 
APO, New York, 09854 

D.O.B. April 18, 1967 



142 



ECOLOGICAL DISASTER: 
Hussein's war against the 

earth. 




The oil drenched cormorant pull himself to the shore. 



An oil coated cormorant pulls Itself to 
the oil drenched beach and struggles to 
pull itself up on the rocks. After raising 
Its head a few inches and moving its 
wings a few times it slowly dropped 
back into the waters of the gulf. 

During the last week of January and 
the first week in February a number of oil 
wells were set fire. U.S. and Saudi of- 
ficials claim they were set by Iraq. The 
fires produced a thick black smoke 
which perhaps was used to provide a 
massive shield that would confuse the 
guidance systems of allied missiles and 
planes and block the view of military 
satellites. Then a full scale disaster was 
reported when a nauseating odor of oil 
was noticed along the coastal areas of 
Saudi Arabia near the border of Kuwait. 
The source of the smell was a 10-mile 
band of crude, so thick in places that 
the water heaved like mud. Iraq is be- 
lieved to have opened the spigots of 
Kuwait's main supertanker-loading pier, 
the sea island terminal. The Iraqis may 
have released up to 120 million gallons 
of oil. "Massive oil spills could turn this 
body of water into a virtual dead sea," 
says vice president of Friends of the 
Earth. 

The oil spill could destroy the nesting 
areas of the endangered sea turtles and 
spawning grounds for shrimp, while poi- 
soning tuna, snapper, sardines and an- 
chovies, which are vital to local fish- 
ermen. 



dropped on 

Iraq and 

Kuwait 

$.20 cost per 

shell, M-16 

machine 

gun. 

$1 million 

cost per 

Tomahawk 

cruise missle 

300 

Tomahawks 

fired 



53% Married 

U.S. troops 

16,337 single 

parents on 

duty 
1,231 both 
parents on 

duty 

$8,485.80 

General 

Schwarzkopf's 

monthly 

salary 

$1,745 



combat pilot 

salary 

$669 private's 

salary 

1,500 

reporters 

covering the 

war. 

3.75 pieces 

Average mail 

received by 

gulf troops per 

day 



143 




A G.I. 



Hear, Lord, my prayer for m 

G.I., ^M^ 

so eager to live-to young to 

die. 




Beneath an alien blistering 

sun, 

he faces a dangerous 

enemy gun. 

The storm clouds gather, the 

horror of war, 

my soldier stands bravely 

guarding the door. 

Defending justice, peace, 

and freedom, 

to his Commander-in Chief 

give Holy Wisdom. 





144 




FAMILY'S 
PRAYER 



. 



From war's alarms, bring swift 

release. 
Hasten the day of honorable 

peace. 

On land and sand and sea 

Jk and air, 
I back my soldier with this 
prayer: 

"No matter how far he's 

forced to roam, 

just bring, I pray, my G.I. 

home." 

Amen 

Robert H. Schuller 





Now»w«»k 



145 



Qntffa 






. sat**'' 



a uriwet*y 




I* 



146 





Squeal is such an exciting day and the 
hard work of Rush is pledge Leslie Griffith. 




The new pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha David 
Collins, Steve Hill and John Jewell are 
greeted by the brothers on Bid Day. 




Sonny Folds and Alison Hart anxiously 
await the new pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha. 



147 



s 



I 

t 

y 



R 

u 
s 

h 



The sisters of Alpha Delta PI get 
fired up on receiving their 
pledges. 




Andy Ruble 



148 




Andy Ruble 




Andy Ruble 

Anita Howell (left) congratu- 
lates Hannah Kim on being a 
new Chi Omega pledge 

Julie Warhurst anxiously 
awaits the announcement of 
their new Phi Mu pledges. 



It all began last spring 
semester with rush 
workshops and skit 
practices for the sisters 
ot Alpha Delta Pi, Chi 
Omega, Delta Zeta, Phi 
Mu, and Zeta Tau Al- 
pha. 

Rush is a very busy time 
for both sorority sisters 
and rushees. But the ef- 
fort and time put into it 
"gives the sisters a 
chance to grow 
closer," said Alpha Del- 
ta Pi Sister Sparkle 
Greenhaw. Many 
bonds were strength- 
ened for all the sisters 
even before rush week 
actually began. 
"I feel that Zeta's suc- 
cess can be credited 
primarily to our Rush 
Chairman Tracy Dean. 
She was organized and 
professional, and at the 
same time, she took 
time to talk to us and 
most importantly to 
pray. It made such a 
difference," Zeta Tau 
Alpha Sister Michelle 
Cartwright stated. 
The first night of rota- 
tional parties gave the 
rushees their first 
glimpse of Greek life. 
The week progressed 
with skit and theme par- 
ties, and then on Sun- 
day Preferential par- 
ties, the most serious of 
all. 

Squeal day was spent 
at various places from 
parties at Oak Moun- 
tain to pool parties. 

— Celeste Fowler and Amy 
Heise 



Marti Norman welcomes the 
new Delta Zeta pledges. 



149 



GREEK 



WEEKEND 



The Samford Greek system par- 
ticipated In a wide range of ac- 
tivities during Its first annual 
Greek Weekend on Nov. 1-3. "I 
think that changing It from Greek 
Week to Greek Weekend was 
positive and a better response to 
students," Panhellenic Adviser 
Suzanne Martin said. 
The Panhellenic Council and IFC 
used four words to collectively 
describe the purpose of Greek 
Weekend: unity, scholarship, ser- 
vice and fun. In past years, Greek 
Week has been too long with too 
much competition. This year the 
purpose was for the weekend to 
be "something everyone could 
enjoy with unity, without the com- 
petition," IFC Representative 
Brent Glossinger said. 
The weekend began that Thurs- 
day night with a Greek worship 
service with Dr. Paul Basden 
speaking on "Loving God with 
Your Heart, Mind and Soul." The 
worship service was well- 
attended, as was the annual 
Greek picture taken at Seibert 
Stadium on Friday morning. 
Later that afternoon over 130 
Greeks went to Hard Elementary 
for the Greek Olympics with sec- 
ond and third-graders. The gen- 
eral consensus of IFC and Pan- 
hellenic was that the program at 
Hard Elementary was a huge suc- 
cess because of the large turn- 
out. "We had more participation 



with Greek Week condensed to a 
weekend," Panhellenic President 
Lorl Phillips said. 

There was a single-elimination 
volleyball tournament at the 
fieldhouse Friday night. To further 
unite the Greeks, the teams were 
not Greek organization vs. Greek 
organization. Instead each team 
was composed of one or two 
Greeks from each fraternity and 
sorority. Each team was given a 
Greek letter, and from these the 
"Delta" team was the volleyball 
tournament winner. 
Tom McDougal was announced 
the winner of the first annual 
Greek Weekend Scholarship at 
the football game Saturday. 
McDougal received a $1000 
scholarship for winning the 
Greek Weekend Essay Contest. 
Further activities that night were 
a cookout on the intramural 
field, followed by a band party in 
the parking lot between the so- 
rority houses. All was going well 
until 10:30 that night when Home- 
wood police asked the band to 
stop playing because of "noise" 
complaints from a nearby house. 
Overall Greek Weekend was very 
successful. According to Martin, 
"Greek Weekend is a big PR 
weekend for us. We wanted to 
make It more than a big party, 
but still have fun!" 

Colette Fowler 






p 

h 
i 



M 
u 



Dana Glasgcock, Kelli Kinard, 
and Lynn Hogewood raise mon- 
ey for the Children's Hospital by 
working at the Rock-a-Thon. 




Phi Mu 




152 



H9Bi 





(Top Left) Julie Warhurst 
proudly displays some Phi Mu 
momentos at Vision '90. 



Amy Perkins and Ashley Dunn 
are enthusiastic about their 
new pledge class. 



The sisters of Phi Mu at Winter 
Formal. 



"Family" was the one 
word that definitely de- 
scribed the close bond 
between the sisters of 
Phi Mu. Since a family 
thrives on growth and 
expansion, the new 
pledges were accept- 
ed instantly as wel- 
come additions. The 
pledges were greeted 
with a Squeal party 
held at the Holiday Inn 
in Hoover followed 
shortly by a Pledge 
Bash at the Botanical 
Gardens. 

Fall semester included 
many exciting events. 
Mystery Masquerade at 
Sloss Furnace, Sweat- 
shirt party and Christ- 
mas formal, both held 
at the Alabama The- 
atre. With spring semes- 
ter came the all impor- 
tant semi-formal held 
at the Mountain Brook 
Inn. 

Social events were fun, 
but service was also 
a top priority. The Al- 
pha Gamma chapter 
proved this when they 
raised $10,000, more 
than any other chapter, 
by holding a rock-a- 
thon. The money was 
given to their philan- 
thropy, the Children's 
Miracle Network. 
They received the 
award of Most Im- 
proved Chapter at 
State Days in Montgom- 
ery on 26 January. The 
chapter advisor, Donna 
Krotzer, was honored 
with the award of Best 
Advisor in the country. 
Obviously, these Phi Mu 
sisters had formed a 
bond that could not be 
broken. "Friends" are 
for now, but "Sisters" 
are forever. 

Oenise Parker 



153 



z 

e 
t 
a 



T 

a 
u 

fl 

P 
h 

a 




Kelli Halterman and Beth 
Nabors stand outside the ZTA 
house and wait for their 
dates. 



Trisha Brown, Lara King, 
Courtney Camp, Carrie Ti His, 
and Lisa Bishop (far right) en- 
joy being new sisters after in 
tiation at Friday's. 



Will McCarty, Donna Kern, 
Christine Luce, Jon VanDyk, 
Lauren Fields and Lee Hale 
enjoy the great atmosphere 
of Baby Doe's during Formal. 



154 




Brooke Collins, Christa Camp, 
Julie Akins, Julie Anderson, 
Heather Poor, and Molli Barren- 
tine are out on one of the many 
late night excursions. 



ri$f\AA iOAA$ 




The ladies of Zeta Tau 
Alpha started oft the 
year with 38 pledges 
and they held a pledge 
party after squeal at 
Oak Mountain. Their 
first party was the 
"Imaginary Friend" Par- 
ty and it was held at 
Twin Pines. Their annual 
Semi-Formal was held 
at the Harbert Center 
and their sweatshirt was 
held at Twin Pines. Win- 
ter Bash was held ar the 
Art Museum and Formal 
was the weekend of 
April 27. Formal night 
was held at Baby Doe's 
and informal night at 
Sloss Furnace. 
The sisters participated 
In Step Sing and placed 
Third with the theme of 
"Candy". At national 
convention they were 
once again recognized 
as a Crown Chapter. 
They were also ranked 
as the third best ZTA 
chapter in the nation. 
They participated in 
many service projects 
such as Hard Elementa- 
ry tutoring, Special 
Olympics, and Habitat 
for Humanity. They 
sponsored a needy 
child and they also sent 
care packages to the 
troops in Operation 
Desert Storm. They held 
a Halloween party for 
the Association of Re- 
tarded Citizens. 
The sisters of ZTA mix 
the right combination 
of service, social and 
achievement to com- 
plete their overall goal 
of fun. 



155 



n 
i 

p 

h 
a 



K 

a 

P 

P 
a 

R 
I 

P 
h 

a 




Shijuana Hudson, Melanie Toles, Karen Snyder, and Sandy Wright show their AKA spirit. 



156 







■ i 







d)mici(injBalfhapt(r " "^ 




^amfotiijjrtfwrsitu. 









Karen Sydnor, Shijuana Hud- 
son, Melanie Toles, Sandy 
Wright, and Robbie Steele 
prepare tor AKA rush. 






The Omicron Mu chap- 
ter of Alpha Kappa Al- 
pha was chartered on 
May, 1988. Being the 
first black Greek letter 
organization on cam- 



Ipus, Omicron Mu em- 
phasizes sisterhood, 
service to the commu- 
nity, and the enhance- 
ment of black women. 
Because of its leader- 
ship, AKA had members 
in many aspects of 
campus life. And since 
scholastic achieve- 
ment is emphasized 
their are many AKA 
members in honor 
societies. AKA mem- 
bers are encouraged to 
participate in campus 
activities and their are 
many in leadership po- 
sitions. 

AKA donates clothes to 
the Hanna Home in Bir- 
mingham. And they do- 
nate their time to the 
Jimmie Hale Mission. 
Although AKA has 
achieved scholastic 
and ethical standardsa 
and promoted unity 
and sisterhood among 
themselves, the sisters 
of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
are striving for even 
more achievements 
and are planning their 
best year yet. 



157 




D 

e 
I 
t 
a 



(Top Right) Kathie Dobra, El- • 
len Whitt, and Elizabeth Testor 
show off their dresses at Black 
Diamond Ba 



Blake Spang, Michelle Bend- 
er, Daphne Carr, and Laura 
Taylor display their athletic 
abilities during the Squeal 
Day party. 



The seniors of ADPI pose for 
their last Squeal picture. 



158 



Blake Spang, Chris Burkes, 
Celeste Fowler, Heather Hardin, 
and Stefanie Parker enjoy the 
Step Sing luncheon held at The 
Club. 




Being an ADPi meant 
more than just wearing 
the letters. It meant a 
bond of sisterhood and 
friendship. This bond 
was strengthened with 
the addtion of their new 
pledges. To welcome 
them, the sisters threw a 
Pledge Bash at the new 
house. 

The rest of fall semester 
proved eventful as well 
with the Hoe Down- 
Square Dance party at 
Camp Hargis. The annu- 
al Semi-formal dance 
was held at the Rama- 
da Inn. The sisters and 
pledges also partici- 
pated in a Christmas 
service project at the 
Festival Tree Civic Cent- 
er. 

During spring semester, 
the ADPi house be- 
came the ADPi Jail 
House as they held their 
Arrest party. Spring for- 
mal was a two night 
event. The Black Dia- 
mond Ball was held the 
first night at the Car- 
raway House. The 
casaul party was the 
next night at the Ves- 
tavia Country Club. The 
high point of spring was 
placing second in Step 
Sing. 

Honor and prestige 
were two qualities that 
went along with being 
an Alpha Delta Pi. These 
shown through when 
the Kappa chapter won 
the Golden Lion award. 
This award is presented 
every two years to the 
most outstanding 
chapter. The chapter 
advisor, Claire Gwaltn- 
gy, received the Advi 
sor of the Year award. 






" 



159 



D 

e 
I 
t 
a 



Z 
e 
t 
a 




160 




I 




(Top Left) The sisters of Delta 
Zeta await the rushees on the 
first day of fall rush. 

The sisters and new pledges 
"slide" away with excitement 
for DZ on Squeal Day at Oak 
Mountain Park. 



Christy Carpenter, Kelly Pea- 
cock, Lisa Whitehead, Angle 
Lowe, and Sheila Baker enjoy 
the Halloween Party. 



Delta Zeta. What did 
these two words stand 
for? They stood for loy- 
alty, frienship, and 
love. The sisters of DZ 
had a sisterhood bond 
that would stand the 
test of time. To them, 
being among their sis- 
ters was the best place 
anyone could want to 
be. 

The sisters and pledges 
of DZ had a busy fall 
semester. There was 
semi-formal at Baby 
Doe's, Pledge Bash, 
and mixers with ATO at 
1MB and Pi Kappa Phi. 
The pledges gave the 
sisters a Halloween par- 
ty at Twin Pines as a gift 
to the chapter. The se- 
mester ended with the 
Big/Little sister Christ- 
mas party. 

When the Alpha PI 
chapter attended Prov- 
idence Day, it did not 
come back empty 
handed. They received 
the highest chapter 
and pledge GPA 
awards. Marti Norman 
received the Miss Prov- 
idence 23 award, which 
is the highest award for 
a senior. 

During spring semester, 
the Delta Zetas held 
Senior Week. This In- 
cluded dinner at Ryan's 
and a senior ceremony. 
Formal was held at the 
Birmingham Turf Club. 
The sisters also did ser- 
vice work. They served 
for a banquet at Christ- 
mas time for the Nation- 
al Speech and Hearing 
Impaired. They teamed 
up with Chi Omega, Sig- 
ma Nu, and Pi Kappa 
Alpha to do Zoobalee. 



161 



c 

h 
i 




e 

g 

a 




Chl Omega 



(Top Right) The sisters of Chi 
Omega display some of their 
cherished belongings at Vi- 
sion '90. 



Kathy Roberts and Charlotte V=* 
Brick anxiously await their £J 
new pledges. 



Carolyn Blrck, Angel Fargar- 
son, Melanie Wardlaw, Nancy 
Baker, Tasha Rohdy, Char- 
lotte Brick, Shannon Perry, 
Dixie Hughes, and Trade Ev- 
ans help out at Vision '90. 




162 




Karen Malone. Dana Davis, Pau- 
lie Crumpton, Deena Haynes, 
Emily Brown, Jennifer Thorn, 
Heather Heaston, Kim Younce, 
Amy Tinnermon, Missy Greenoe, 
Cheri Weaver, Mary Prugh, and 
Kathy Jo Spivey enjoy spring 
break. 



oooosoeoooodoioo 

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ii © o o o d # ooooo 
soioo ■ * oooo : 






00000 tv wwvfwt 

0000000000000000 
06000000040000^0 

OOOOdOGGOOOOOiO 



To outsiders, Chi Ome- 
ga was just another so- 
rority, but to the sisters 
and new pledges it was 
a way ot life. They did 
everything together 
from living in the new 
house to eating lunch 
in the cafe. But then 
again, aren't sisters 
supposed to be in- 
separable? 

The fun all began with 
the Chi-O Cruise held at 
the house in honor of 
the pledges. Then 
came Peace, Love & 
Chi-O, which was also 
held at the house. Fall 
semester was ended on 
a good note with for- 
mal held at the Ves- 
tavia Country Club. 
The Jungle Love party 
took place in the spring 
at the Vestavia Recre- 
ational Center. The 
highlight of the semes- 
ter was semi-formal 
held at the Chase Lake 
Country Club. 
The sisters of Chi Ome- 
ga not only had a full 
social calendar, but 
they also had a full ser- 
vice calendar. They 
participated in the 
Christmas service proj- 
ect at the Festival Tree 
Civic Center, helped 
with Special Olympics, 
and worked at the 
book fair for the School 
of Education. 
To be included in the 
exclusive circle of the 
Chi Omega sorority 
meant everything to 
these girls. It was a life 
long commitment that 
carried with it the priv- 
ilege of wearing the 
coveted Chi-O jersey 
as well as the prestige 
of being a member. 



163 



F 

r 

a 

t 

e 

r 

n 

i 

t 

y 

R 
u 



h 



New Pi Kappa Phi 
pledges Chad In- 
gram, Kevin Holly 
and Jason Cook 
rush out to meet 
their new pledge 
brothers. 




PI Kappa Alpha 



164 





All photos by Andy Ruble 

David Carter and David Ben- 
nett (upper left) chose to go 
the NU way. 

Marty Ready and Jodey 
Swann are proudly wearing 
their new Lambda Chi jersys. 



%w 




1 



i m » cw 




Adrienne Gantt, Debbie 
Wilgus, Karen Morrow, Kelly 
Newsome and Melissa Bailey 
little sisters of Sigma Chi wel- 
come the new pledges. 



Let's go back in time to 
the wild, wild, west the 
prehistoric time of the 
cavemen, or the psy- 
chedelic party of 
Woodstock. Or let's just 
take a trip to an elite 
country club or let's ex- 
perience a rendition of 
"Animal House." 
The brothers of Pi Kap- 
pa Alpha turned psy- 
chedelic at their Wood- 
stock party and they 
took a ride on the wild 
side at their Wild, Wild 
West party. Pi Kappa Al- 
pha pledged 30 new 
men. Sigma Chi gave 
the rushees a band par- 
ty and they had a roar- 
ing Wild, Wild West par- 
ty. The men of Sigma 
Chi added 30 new 
pledges to their al- 
ready large fraternity. 
The brothers of Lambda 
Chi Alpha partied 
"Animal House" style 
at their Toga party and 
they became beast at 
their caveman party. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
pledged 19 new asso- 
ciates. Pi Kappa Phi en- 
tertained the rushees 
with a Wild, Wild West 
party and they pledged 
19 new faces. The 
brothers of Sigma Nu 
went sailing at their 
country club party and 
they took a dip at Sig 
Beach. The men of Sig- 
ma Nu pledged 18 men. 
These are just and few 
examples of the Frater- 
nity Rush parties that 
were experienced by 
the rushees. No matter 
his taste in music, 
clothes, or hobbies he 
could find his place on 
fraternity row. Donna Kem 



165 




All photos by Pike. 



Micheal Oliver and Chuck 
Long (top) enjoy the spend- 
ing time with each other at 
Formal in Ft. Walton Beach, FL. 



George Parker, Jon Ander- 
son, Eric Fort, Robert Bell , and 
Gentry Gonzalez (top right) 
rest by the Pi Kappa Alpha 
fountain before the Wild Wild 
West rush party begins. 



Robert Bell has to hold back 
the Pike spirit exhibited by 
Matt Browning, Eric King, 
Andy Halstead, John Carter, 
Mark Reed, Bill Nelson, Myrle 
Grate, Andy Veal and Jim 
Jeffcoat. 




166 




Cameron Griffin is shown by Jim 
Baggett, Chris Rowe and Derek 
Wardlaw that he is a little out of 
style at the Woodstock rush par- 
ty 





]\\ iKuj.ij.ut Alpha 

HDllii uuio ¥ nun 



aMitk 






111 ItJllLltl 1 Mi Mi AIM IJkiM 

A\*\l\L\A\{MlMiMiMMMiMlA 



"Throu ors of this 

the best fro 
pus- 
sign hangs in 
the Pike hous 

believe this rr alter 

of opinion, but t broth- 

ers of nKA it is a way of life. 

"Pi Kappa Al as given 

me the opportunity to grow. I 
have a new sense of pride." 
The brothers of riKA started 
the year off right with 30 
pledges. The fraternities an- 
nual parties consisted of 
their Halloween Party, Christ- 
mas Semi-formal, and their 
Formal in Ft. Walton Beach, 
FL. 

The goal of the fraternity is 
to have fun, but another ob- 
jective is service. Pike par- 
ticipates in the Adopt-a-mile 
program. They serve with 
Habitat for Humanity and In- 
ner City. The brothers tutor 
children at Hard Elementary 
School and they have just 
become a part of the Big 
Brother of America program. 
They participated in Step 
Sing with a very entertaining 
show with the theme of 
"Disco." They truly have cap- 
tured the spirit of Step Sing. 

To those that are united 
and serve others they are re- 
warded. They won the Rush 
award at their Regional Con- 
ference, and they also be- 
came the Intermurai Softball 
Champions. They celebrated 
their 80th anniversary on our 
campus in March. 

John Carter sums up the 
essence of nKA by stating " 
It is the coolest fraternity on 
campus. All the brothers are 
very genuine in their presen- 
tation of themselves. They 
tend to be accepting of oth- 
ers, and yet there is a stand- 
ard to maintain on campus." 
The opinion of best trai- 
ls left to the individual, but Pi 
Kappa Alpha definat 
that which is to be desired. 

Donna Kern 



167 



s 

I 

g 

m 
a 



C 
h 
i 



Barrett Jordan and Jason Pierce 
at the Sigma Chi National Lead- 
ership Conference. 




All photos by Sigma Chi 







JiAtjJkliMtiJk fcamfurft Hmurrsitg 

mm a Mm 







MimMMMMl 




168 





Jelf Roberts and David 
Parnell (upper left) 
pose at the Sigma Chi 
House. 

At the EX Rush Party, 
Jetf Roberts (upper 
right) jams the song 
"What's my Scene" with 
Y.B. Normal a* Sloss Fur- 
nace. 



The new Executive 
Committee: (Back 
Row): Mike Middleton, 
Ron Wood, Bart Mason, 
John Johnson (Middle 
Row): Jason Bowlds, 
Mark Davidson, Jeff 
Roberts, Steve Dillard 
(Front Row): Scott Mc- 
Cary, Jason Pierce and 
Mike Mahanes. 



"I will try to make my 
college, the Sigma Chi 
Fraternity, and my own 
chapter more honored 
by all men and women 
and more beloved and 
honestly respected by 
our own brothers." 
Sigma Chi received 
both the Interfraternity 
Council Brother and 
Pledge Class Scholar- 
ship Awards. Whether It 
is with the utilization of 
computer equipment 
or a complex tutorial 
system, the brothers of 
Sigma Chi are continu- 
ally expanding their 
scholarship program. 
But the brothers find 
time for athletics and 
were fortunate to win 
the Interfraternity 
Council All Sports tro- 
phy. 

A proud moment came 
during the Awards Day 
ceremony when Sigma 
Chi was recognized as 
the Samford University 
Outstanding Fraternity 
for the fifth year In a 
row. 

The Pi Chapter actively 
participates in its Na- 
tional Headquarters 
chapter development 
program and has been 
acknowledged as a 
Peterson Significant 
Chapter, as well as be- 
ing rewarded with the 
Legion of Honor Award 
for outstanding schol- 
arship nationwide. 
Despite all honors, Sig- 
ma Chi cherishes the 
success of a genuine 
brotherhood. 



Jell Robert*. 



169 



s 

i 

g 

m 
a 



Mike Dye, Mark Driskill, and 
Les Myers share quality 
brotherhoodd time together. 



N 
u 



Matt McCuen, Andrew 
Beck, Patrick Howell, and 
Alan Espy enjoy formal in 
Fort Walton Beach, Florida. 




170 




Patrick Howell, Andy Beck, and 
Lonnie Coggins relax on the 
sand during a beach party. 




8>tnma Ntt 



14 ^SW 41 

^a m fur i) lluiurriiiti] 





□EOBQ 



For the past one- 
hundred and twelve 
years the lota Chapter 
of Sigma Nu Fraternity 
has been building a tra- 
dition of excellence. 
This year was no excep- 
tion. The brothers and 
pledges became ac- 
tively involved in all 
types of academic, 
athletic, and social ac- 
tivities. The members 
include several aca- 
demic as well as Pres- 
idential scholars. Ath- 
letics also played a 
role in their fraternity. In 
varsity athletics, they 
had members on the 
track, football, base- 
ball, golf, and soccer 
teams. They also ex- 
celled in the interfrater- 
nity intramural sports 
program. At least one 
of their members could 
be found in nearly 
every social organiza- 
tion on campus such as 
student government, 
FCA, student recruit- 
ment team, BSU and 
many more. As they 
build on their traditions 
of love, truth and hon- 
or, the Sigma Nus will 
definitely be a part of 
the success of this uni- 
versity. 



171 



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i 



K 
a 

P 

P 
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h 
i 



The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi per- 
form fheir rendition of MC Ham- 
mer at the annual step sing com- 
petition. 




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Alpha Ela CCliaptrr 






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172 




The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi 
express their enthusiasm 
about rush. 




Pi Kappa Phi experi- 
enced a rebirth at 
Samford University dur- 
ing the 1990-91 school 
year. Their rush theme 
"Don't be just another 
brick in the wall" turned 
out to be more appro- 
priate than had ever 
been imagined. 
The re-chartering of the 
Alpha Eta chater took 
place on January 25, 
1991, after an unprec- 
edented amount of 
commitment, work and 
love on the part of the 
brothers. A celebration 
banquet was held at 
the Sheraton Perimeter. 
Their year was full of so- 
cial events, including 
mixers with Alpha Delta 
Pi, Delta Zeta, Phi Mu 
and Zeta Tau Alpha. 
They celebrated the 
86th birthday of our fra- 
ternity with a founders' 
day party. 

The spring calendar 
was filled with "The 
Most Casual Party,'' 
spring break in Dayto- 
na Beach, the "Bronze 
Body Bash," and a 
chapter retreat. 
The Pi Kapps also were 
involved in a Push-a- 
thon for 91 hours to 
raise money for their 
national philanthropy, 
People Understanding 
the Severely Handi- 
capped (PUSH). 
Pi Kappa Phi was well 
represented in campus 
events and organiza- 
tions like BSU, campus 
outreach, SOLO, stu- 
dent senate, College 
Bowl, Step Sing and in- 
tramurals. 

Randy Griffith 



Dwayne Todd, Mark Perrin, 
and Jason Sasser enjoy hav- 
ing the executive council re- 
treat in Panama City Beach, 
Florida. 



173 



L 

a 
m 
d 
a 



C 
h 
i 



fi 
I 

P 
h 

a 



The brothers of Lambda Chi 
Alpha wait In front of the stu- 
dent center while associates 
sign rush bids inside. 




Bid Day. Front Row Stephen Bonner, Daryl Hyde, Ken Haynes, Jeff Archer, Paul King, 
Stephen Smith, Ross Lankford. Second RowJohn Harvey, Brian Yarberry, Randy 
Allen, Steve White, Keith Latham, John Hill, Matthew Harper, Chris Hale, Richard Britt, 
Marty Ready, Justin Rudd. Third Row Scott Applefield, Honzik Keclik, Destry 
McFearin, Chris Johnson, Bryan Ballard, Kelly Trull, Richard Thompson, Alex Collins, 
Chris Hill, Brooke Holbert, Chuck Macurda, Boyd Hanson, Darren Shirley, Cal Cart- 
wright. Fourth Row Keith Sharp, Jamie Curlee, Jeff Jordan, Greg Snaders, Eddie 
Moore, Travis Fowler, Matt Johnston, Casey Fitzsimons, Paul Touliatos, Chris Brown, 
Sam Hays, Ian Thompson, Jimmy Rhoades, Paul Ruby, Phil Murray, Charlton Kircus. 



174 




Front Row: Marty Ready, Daryl 
Hyde, Matthew Harper, Paul 
Ruby, Hunter. Middle Row: Ken 
Haynes, Richard Britt, John Hill, 
Chris Hill. Back Row: Randy Al- 
len, Frank McGavy, Matt Willis. 
This step sing performance of 
Rollin' On the River won these 
brothers second place in the 
men's division. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 




Lambda Chi Alpha en- 
joyed another success- 
ful year. 

Throughout the school 
year, the fraternity en- 
joyed participation In 
several service proj- 
ects including Birming- 
ham Big/Little Brothers, 
Adopt-A-Mile, and Pan- 
try Raid. 

The brotherhood also 
took part in the Ugly 
Man Contest and do- 
nated blood to the 
American Red Cross 
Blood Drive. The high- 
light of the year was the 
adoption of the Mada- 
gascar Hissing Roach 
at the Birmingham Zoo 
as part of the Wildchild 
Adoption Days. 
Members of Lambda 
Chi Alpha enjoyed par- 
ticipation in activities 
and organizations in- 
cluding intramurals, 
Step Sing, Greek Week- 
end. Spring Fling, Miss 
Samford, Homecoming, 
A Cappella Choir, 
Campus Ministries, 
Campus Outreach, BSU, 
Inner-City Missions, 
SGA senate, class offi- 
cers, resident assis- 
tants, theatre, Dean's 
List, golf, track, tennis, 
cheerleading, and 
football. 

Lambda Chi Alpha also 
continued their support 
of Samford athletics in- 
cluding football, bas- 
ketball and baseball 
with the Dawg Pound. 
The annual Crescent 
Formal took place at 
Panama City Beach. 
This year was ended 
with an alumni lunch- 
eon at the Rotunda 
Club and house note 
burning party after- 
wards. 



175 




PANHELLENIC 
COUNCIL 



After having completed a 
successful sorority rush 
week, the Panhellenlc Coun- 
cil simply could not be 
stopped. The council 
viewed its responsibilities as 
year long, not merely as 
"Rush Monitors". It contin- 
ued to promote sororities by 
offering unity anong all the 
chapters. 

Advisor to the Panhellinic 
Council, Suzanne Martin 
stated that "(it) promoted 
quality programming by 
venturing into new territory". 
Throughout the year, Pan- 
hellenlc hosted programs 
that were of concern to most 
students. Among these in- 
cluded an Alcohol Aware- 
ness Program, a program on 



Self Defense, on on Resume 
Writing and an Etiquette Pro- 
gram. 

By hosting this year's state 
Panhellenic Conference, 
the Council continued to 
promote unity. In addition, it 
sponsored the Greek 
Teleconference at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama at Bir- 
mingham. With over 180 stu- 
dents that attended all 
sororities and fraternities 
were represented. 
Another shining example of 
the council's efforts to unite 
the sororities, was through a 
Panhellenic Pledge Fellow- 
ship Bible Study. Here 
pledges got together to 
share a special time of fel- 
lowship with other pledges 



from various sororities and 
to develop closer friendship 
between the girls. The turn 
out was sucessful with over 
100 girls attending. 
Lori Phillips, Panhellenic 
President, and this year's 
council decided to take 
many risks. The end result 
was a "Panhellenic Spirit" 
that could be felt through 
out the sorority greek sys- 
tem. By offering various pro- 
gramming, Panhellenic not 
only was working towards 
the development of a com- 
munity among each soror- 
ity, but it also offered a un- 
ion by bringing together 
those involved in the Greek 
system and Independants. 

Ashley Leech 




Panhellenic Council 

Panhellenic Council: Kris Crosby, Trista Finch, Mandy Newman, Bonnie Casey, Elise Oliver, Leslie Henry, 
Nlkkl Reeves. Suzanne Martin. Kathy Dobra. Lori Phillips and Shijuana Hudson. 



176 



GREEK IS 
THE WAY 
TO GO!! 




The brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha (far left) are raising money 
by a raffle drawing during convo hour. 

Khrlsten Deichert and Hope Sumrall are glad that it is the 
last night of Step Sing. 



Tony Hale, Elizabeth Tester, Lelia Siler, and Chris Glass enjoy 
the Sigma Chi Wild Wild West Party. 



177 



Omo&$ 0k 




178 





Tiffany Townsend performs during half- 
time at the Homecoming game. 




Bruce Powers and Brian Randies help con- 
struct a church. One of Alpha Phi Ome- 
ga's many service projects. 




During an ROTC get together Wes 
Yeatman enjoys food and fun. 



179 




ere we go! 



As Drum Major David 
Burdeshaw's voice echoed 
across the campus two weeks 
prior to classes, the Samford 
University Bulldog Marching 
Band started their first annual 
band camp August 13-24. 

"The first word that comes to 
my mind is intense," comment- 
ed Senior Erick Fitzgerald, re- 
membering the heat and hard 
work involved in the camp. 

Practice began at 6 each 
morning with a brisk walk 
around the perimeter of the 
campus in preparation for the 
day's rehearsal. From then un- 
til dinner, the day was spent 
mastering the music and the 
marching drill. 

However, at no time was 
camp without leisure time. Dai- 
ly card games, trips to local 
pools, and marathon movie 
viewing helped break the mo- 
notony of every day life. 

Sophomore Shawn Evans 
borrowed this famous line to 
sum up band camp, "It was the 
best of times, it was the worst 
of times, or vice-versa." 

When classes began, the 
practices were shortened to a 
daily hour and a half. This re- 
quired more concentration 
from all members. But even 
with the added pressure, by 
the first game, the show was 
ready. 

"I knew it was going to be 
well-done, but it was a better 
done show than I expected 
and only foreshadowed what 
was to come," Director of 
Bands John Remley said. 

Cooperation was a key fac- 
tor in the life of the band. With 
the right attitude, anything 
could be accomplished. 

Tlflany Townsend 




Darren Capeheart 

A tuba makes the perfect shade 
for David Fuller who watches the 
"Dogs" from afar. 



Darren Capeheart 

Squinting in the bright sunlight, 
Drum Major David "Bird" 
Burdeshaw intently watches the 
game. 



V- 




Darren Capeheart 

Surrounded by his personal fans, Chip Wise wails on his trumpet solo 
in "Ya Gotta Try." 



180 




The Bulldog Band lines up to march in the stands. 



(left) The band perfoi 
one of its pre-game music 
selections as the fans look 
on. 







Angela Schooley skillfully 
twirls her flag during one 
of the many halftime 
shows. 




"Doc" Remley wears an- 
other one of his infamous 
hats while cheering the 
Bulldogs on to victory. 




Kim Bridges displays a 
bright smile to the crowd 
as the band performs "The 
Star Spangled Banner." 



Marching to the beat of a different drum, Todd Jones, Julian Goss, 
and Kevin Holley keep a steady tempo during "School's Out." 



181 



ORGANIZATIONS 

Academy of Students of Pharmacy 
Alpha Epsilon Delta 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Alpha Lambda Delta 

Alpha Phi Omega 

Alpha Psi Omega 

American Guild of Organists 

American Society of Interior Design 

Angel Flight 

Arnold Air Society 

Association of Business Majors 

Association of Childhood Education International 

Baptist Student Union 
Baptist Student Union Choir 

Beta Beta Beta 

Black Student Organization 

Campus Ministries 

Christian Pharmacy Fellowship 

Church Recreation Majors Club 

Circle K International 

Civitan Club 

Communications Association 

Crimson 

Crimson Club 

Cumberland Sports & Entertainment Law Society 

Debate Team 
Delta Omicron 

Entre Nous 

Fashion Club 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes 

French Club 

Freshman Council 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 

German Club 

Habitat for Humanity 

Ham Radio 

Hypatia 

Interfraternity Council 

International Fellowship 



182 



Kappa Delta Epsilon 

Kappa Delta Pi 

Kappa Omicron Phi 

Kappa Pi 

Kappa Psi 

Lambda Kappa Sigma 

Math Club 

Ministerial Association 

Ministers to the Military 

Music Educator's National Conference 

Nu Epsilon Delta 

Omicron Delta Kappa 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Phi Eta Sigma 

Phi Kappa Phi 

Phi Lambda Sigma 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 

Physical Education Majors Club 

Pi Delta Phi 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Pi Kappa Lambda 

Pi Mu Epsilon 

Rho Chi Honor Society 

Samford Alabama Conservancy 

Samford Panhellenic Association 

Samford Paralegal Association 

Samford Soccer Club 

Samford Sociological Association 

Samford University Home Economics Association 

Samford University Theatre 

Sigma Delta Pi 

Sigma Tau Delta 

Sigma Theta Tau 

Society of Physics Students 

Spanish Club 

Student Dietetic Association 

Student Government Association 

Samford University Association of Nursing Students 

United Nations and International Affairs Society 

Voices of Triumph 
Word Players 
WVSU-FM 91 



183 






ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



The Tau Lambda Chapter of Al- 
pha Psi Omega became a very 
visible organization on cam- 
pus this year. They hosted a 
theatre information booth for 
freshmen and newcomers at 
Vision '90, performed a cos- 
tumed dramatic interpretation 
of Solomon's "Song of Songs" 
for St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Church, created a 17th century 
entertainment for the Birming- 
ham Museum of Art Ball and 
sponsored pre-show lectures 
for THE ROAR OF THE GREASE- 
PAINT, THE SMELL OF THE CROWD 
and THE SECOND SHEPHERD'S 
PLAY. Two members, Sherrie 
Rothermel and Penny Edwards, 
explicated and gave a schol- 
arly analysis of Shakepeare's 



Sonnet 23 for the September 28 
Alpha Psi Omega meeting. 
They also raised money by 
ushering at the Leslie Stephen 
Wright Concert Hall for the Bir- 
mingham Music Club travel- 
ogues and other selected 
events. Another fund raiser in- 
cluded working with the 
Samford Sociological Associ- 
ation to sell refreshments at 
THE ROAR OF THE GREASEPAINT, 
THE SMELL OF THE CROWD to 
benefit Habitat for Humanity. 




3888 



t 




i 



184 



PATIO, 
PORCH 



and GRACELAND 



As part of the fall 
"Welcome Back" activi- 
ties, senior theatre ma- 
jors, Sherrie Rothermel 
and LeAnne Browning di- 
rected an evening of 
memorable Southern 
one-act plays, PATIO and 
PORCH by Jack Heifner 
and GRACELAND by Ellen 
Byron. The trio of come- 
dies opened September 6 
and played through the 
9th. 

Dixie humor was a com- 
mon thread in the short, 
vivid plays, and the roles 
were all smashing, tour de 
force vehicles for six ac- 
tresses. Laura Kilgore and 
Autumn Baggott ap- 
peared in PATIO, the story 



of sisters in Texas. Rebec- 
ca Edwards and Elizabeth 
Powell played mother 
and daughter in PORCH, 
also set in Texas. Julia Hix- 
on and Lisa Carter were 
the stars of GRACELAND, a 
play which humorously 
dealt with two Elvis fans 
and how they formed a 
friendship despite their 
differences. Bart 

McGeehon designed the 
scenery and costumes for 
all three shows. 





All photos by Barbara Olson 

Laura Kilgore and Autumn Baggott (above) play two sisters In the play 
"Patio." 



Laura Kilgore and Autumn Baggott appear in "Patio" which was 
set in Texas. 



185 



ROTC 

AND 

ANGEL 

FLIGHT 



Located in the basement 
of Crawford Johnson, the 
Air Force ROTC program 
supplies the Air Force with 
top notch officers from 
the graduates of Samford, 
Birmingham Southern, 
UAB, and Montevallo. 
AFROTC cadets spend 
their first two years learn- 
ing the organization of 
the Air Force, marching, 
and participating In var- 
ious physical activities. In 
the last two years, cadets 
learn management prin- 
ciples and national pol- 
icy In preparation for be- 
Ing commissioned 
Second Lieutenants. They 
will then go on to various 



career fields. 
This year there were about 
seventy cadets enfolled. 
Of this seventy, approxi- 
mately twenty were from 
Samford. One of the ac- 
tivities that the cadets 
participated in this year 
Included a base trip to 
Florida. This past sum- 
mer's activities included 
field training for the soph- 
omores and special as- 
signments for the juniors. 
Two new Samford Second 



David Tabor and Stan Peter 
make sure they have everything 
on their list before going to Ca- 
lifornia. 




Angel Flight: (front row) Martha Hurston, Darlene Freeman, Donna Conyers, Dawn 
Swain, Tammy Hicks, Beth Blackard, Sharna Spillman, and Becky King, (second row) 
Marcy Carroll, Lisa Fields, Donna Sklpworth, Hope Dutton, Dendra Little, Debbie 
Snead, Susan Fury, Terri Williams, Stacy Fleming, and Susan Cowart. (third row) 
Marlene Batle, Risa Calloway, Kim Geat, Jane Glover, Jennifer Cobb, and Steph- 
anie Nelll. (fourth row) Heather Humphreys, Kathy, Jennifer Corey, Heather French, 
Michelle leone, and Theresa Hawkins. Not pictured: Lenora Peppers, Paige Munson 
and Lisa Dwlgglns. 




All Photos by ROTC and Angel Flight 

Hope Dutton, Rlsa Callaway and Deandra Little with the Easter Bunny 
and a nlnja turtle at the Egg hunt held for the children who had 
parents in the Gulf War. 



186 



TSgt. Randy Nash, TSgt. Mary 
J. Johnson, Capt. James 
Tweedy, Lt.Col. Steven Ab- 
bott, Lllia Brown, Sec, Capt 
Robert Knapp. 



ALPHA FLIGHT: (Front row) 
Matt Markham, Mike Ham- 
brecht, and Bo Scoggins 
(Second row) Lincoln Stewart, 
Mark Seary, Missy Jane Car- 
lisle (Third row) Greg Simp- 
son, Robert Morgan 



CHARLIE FLIGHT: (Front row) 
Jason Abbott, Elizabeth Price, 
Danny Maddox, Jerry Isom 
(Second row) Rob Sandlln, 
Sean Smith, Jay Fulmea, Ja- 
son Hobbs (Third row) Matt 
Browning, Jeff Smith, Mark 
Majors, Ben Johnson 



DELTA FLIGHT: (First row) Pat 
Booker, Russ Stovall, Randy 
Garnito.John Wynn (Second 
row) Jerry Jones, Jeff Shores, 
Stan Peter, Eric Hube (Third 
row) Craig Clayburn, Khaled 
Basionmy, Rob Skelton 



BRAVO FLIGHT: (Front row) 
Cindy Johnson, George Par- 
ker, Cameron Collette, Wes 
Yeatman (Second row) David 
Tabor, Stephanie Ireland, Ken 
Bourland, Neil Nipper, (Third 
row) Ches Allen, Terry Mor- 
gan, Oscar Kent 




Lieutenants, Eric Hube 
and Rob Skelton received 
elite pilot training assign- 
ments at the Air Force's 
Euro-NATO Joint Pilot 
Training Center at Shep- 
pard Air Force Base, Te, 
as. 

Angel Flight Is an honor- 
ary, professional and ed- 
ucational service organ- 
ization that works in 
conjunction with Arnold 
Air Society. 

Arnold Air Society bene- 
fits philanthropies, col- 
lege campuses and the 
community. 

For Angels there is no re- 
quired military obligation 
what-so-ever but the 
members enjoy helping 
with the recruiting efforts 
of AFROTC. 

Although the majority of 
the girls come from 
Samford, Angel Flight 
also draws members from 
Birmingham Southern and 
UAB. Angel Flight now has 
approximately 36 active 
members. 

This year Angel Flight and 
Arnold Air Society were 
involved in numerous ac- 
tivities. The biggest, host 
is Area Conclave 1991 in 
Huntsville. Approximately 
250 Angels and Amies 
from all over Alabama 
and Mississippi met at AR- 
CON to attend workshops, 
parties and a military 
awards banquet. 
Other activities include 
working as tutors at Hall 
Kent Elementary School, 
helping March of Dimes 
host Walk America and 
hosting an Easter egg 
hunt for the children who 
had parents in Saudi Ara- 
bia. 

Both groups also partici- 
pated in fund raisers, par- 
ties, formals, POW/MIA 
awareness promotions 
and wonderful weekly 
meetingsl 

Stephanie Nell and Hope Button 



187 



SOCIETY 
OF 

PROFESSIONAL 

JOURNALIST 



The Journalism/ Mass Com- 
munications department es- 
tablished its first ever chap- 
ter of Society of Professional 
Journalist. 

The national society repre- 
sents professional and stu- 
dent journalists and encour- 
ages the freedon of 
information, ethics and the 
advancement of the profes- 
sion. 

The chapter sponsored 
monthly meeting featuring 
professional speakers in the 
fields of public relations, 
print, broadcasting and ad- 
vertising. 

Meeting topics Included: re- 
porting and job hunting tips. 
The chapter inducted twen- 
ty-seven members last 
spring. A past president and 
Scott Johnson, regional di- 
rector of the society, were 
there to initiate the new 
members. 

The chapter hosted the Al- 
abama High School Journal- 
ism Workshop and an end of 
the year banquet at Oak 
Mountain State Park. 
SPJ evolved out of the former 
Samford Communications 
Association. This years offi- 
cers Included: Rich Johnson, 
president; Christine Luce, 
vice-president; Jenna Buice, 
Secretary; Dianne Shoe- 
make, treasurer; Tony Hale, 
publicity; and Jamie Tuning, 
newsletter editor. Jon Clem- 
mensen was the staff advi- 
ior. 




After a SPJ meeting Tony Hale, Christine Luce, and Rich Johnson 
gather to discuss the speaker. 



188 




COMMUNI- 
CATION 
GAP 



THE 
CRIMSON 



The Communications Depart- 
ment fills all communication 
gaps. Whether radio, newspaper, 
or yearbook the students find 
their place in the Journalism de- 
partment depending on their in- 
terest. THE CRIMSON is the news- 
paper and it covers all campus 
events and for the first time it was 
printed weekly. THE CRIMSON was 
under the leadership of co- 
editors: Brian Still and Eric David. 
News Editor was Tara Springfield 
and Associate News Editor was 
Leslie Peacock. The Sports Editor 
was Beth Myatt and the Associ- 
ate Sports Editor was Andy Par- 
rish. The Arts and Entertainment 
Editor was Christine Luce. The 
Opinions Editor was Amy Walker 
adn the Associate Opinions Ed- 
itor was Kathie Dobra. The Photo 
Editor was Andy Rubleand the Ed- 
itorial cartoonist was Tom Bris- 
coe. The Copy Editor/Business 
Manager was Candace Shilling 
and Copy Editor was Jana Chan- 
dler. 

The ENTRE NOUS is the yearbook 
and it gives students the oppor- 
tunity to write creative plus news 
style. The Yearbook is a momen- 
to of the college experience. The 



yearbook was under the editor- 
ship of Donna Kern and the As- 
sistant editor was Robin Hamil- 
ton. The Copy editors were 
Celeste Fowler and Kim Huck- 
abee. The Photo editor was Andy 
Ruble. Staff Members included 
Lisa Oliphant, Melanie Greene, 
Tiffany Townsand, Ashley Leech, 
Lynn Waldrop, and Darren 
Capeheart. 

The business editors for the ENTRE 
NOUS and THE CRIMSON are Kelly 
Eldridge as Advertising director. 
The Assistant director was Nikki 
Gaither and the Graphics/ Pro- 
duction Manager was Craig 
Hyde. The sales representatives 
include: Mama Smith, Ray Pelle- 
tier, and John Salmon. 
WVSU is the radio station and it is 
found on FM 91. WVSU reaches a 
wide range audience and not 
just students but also Birmingham 
residents. The station is mostly a 
jazz channel but on Sundays the 
station plays Christian music. The 
Station Manager is Dan Parker 
and the Assistant Station Manag- 
er is Carol Gutherie. Jim Hamil is 
in charge of the Sunday pro- 
grams and Grant Guffin was in 
charge of the news. 





N 



W 9 



1 




D 




© u i 

U S F 
U M 



189 



PHARMACY 



AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 
ACADEMY OF STUDENTS OF PHARMACY — The 
student affiliate of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, this organization rep- 
resents all facets of the profession. Profes- 
sional and social activities are sponsored 
annually, and all pharmacy students are el- 
igible for membership. 



KAPPA PSI PHARMACEUTICAL FRATERNITY — 
The national pharmaceutical fraternity 
chartered on the Samford campus, the Gam- 
ma Zeta chapter at Samford is the largest 
chapter in the nation. Professional and so- 
cial functions are sponsored each year, and 
members participate in a variety of service 
projects. Bids are given to interested stu- 
dents during the fall semester of each ac- 
ademic year. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA — This organization is 
dedicated to recognizing and encouraging 
leadership. Membership is by invitation only 
and is offered to selected second and third 
year students each fall semester. 






190 



ORGANIZATIONS 







■I 





RHO CHI — This is the national academic 
honor society, recognizing outstanding 
scholarship of selected pharmacy students. 
In order to be eligible, students must be in 
the top 20 percent of their class, have a GPA 
of 3.0 or higher, and fulfill requirements for 
outstanding character, personality, and 
leadership. Membership is by invitation only 
and is offered each fall semester to selected 
second and third year students. 



LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA — This organization is 
the national sorority for pharmacy students. 
Professional and social activities along with 
service projects are sponsored each year, 
and bids are given each fall semester to 
interested pharmacy students. 



FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN PHARMACISTS — 
This is the pharmacy student religious or- 
ganization. All students are encouraged to 
join and participate in the activities of this 
social group which include weekly morning 
devotionals, periodic social functions, and 
service projects. 



191 



Reestablishing 
Tradition 



After overcoming last year's trag- 
edy, Samford's debate team, under 
the direction of Janet L.Keys, began 
to reestablish its tradition of excel- 
lence In national forensic compe- 
tition. Starting with only two mem- 
bers, Scott Barber and Michael 
Jordan, the team grew almost five- 
fold to a total of nine members, 
including: Lara Evers, Mahn 
Nguyen, Tracey McCarter, Anthony 
Brooks, Brad Harris, James Won- 
setler and Derek Farrior. 
The team participated in compe- 
titions at some of the finest colle- 
giate institutions In the nation, in- 
cluding, but not limited to, Emory 
University in Atlanta, the University 
of Kentucky in Lexington, Harvard 
University in Cambridge, Wake For- 
est University in Winston-Salem, 
Baylor University in Waco, and Nov- 
ice Nationals held at Nothwestern 
Univeristy in Chicago. The team 
gained nationalrecognition by win- 
ning awards at numerous tourna- 
ments. Lara Evers 




192 




Scott Barber and Mike Jordan go over the material for the debate the next day. 



Manh Nguyen takes a break to 
catch up on the latest world 
events. 





Members of the 
debate team, 
Scott Barber, 
Tracey McCarter, 
Lara Evers, Mike 
Jordan, and An- 
thony Brooks, 
leave for a meet. 



193 



SSA 



The Samford Sociological Association is a 
social awareness and action group open to all 
students, faculty, staff, and administration. 
They are committed to not only educating 
themselves and others about social injustices 
but also to taking an active part in correcting 
some of the injustices and making our world a 
better place for everyone. They focus primarily, 
but not exclusively, on issues concerning hun- 
ger and homelessness. 

The group meets bi-weekly with feature pro- 
grams on various subjects of social conscious- 
ness — from Birmingham's Health Care for the 
Homeless to Feminist Ideology. 
They have numerous service projects every se- 
mester, such as food, clothing, or toiletry 
drives. And the group also participates in proj- 
ects like cleaning up shelters and working with 
social service organizations in the city. 

In addition to these projects, they have two 
annual projects each year — the Hunger and 
Homelessness Awareness Week in the fall and 
the Hunger Cleanup in the spring. Both of these 
projects are sponsored by the National Student 
Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness 
(NSCAHH). The NSCAHH has a conference every 
fall that members of the Samford Sociological 
Association attend as we" 



The Housing Now Rally in Washington, D.C. 
was part of the National Student Campaign 
Against Hunger & Homelessness Confer- 
ence. 



SAMFORD 

SOCIOLOGICAL 

ASSOCIATION 




Samford Sociological Association and World Hunger 
Committee (above) band together to present the 
"Offering of Letters." 

These SSA members participate in the 36 hour vigil for 
the homeless during the Hunger and Homelessness 
Awareness Week. 

Students gather at the National Student Campaign 
Against Hunger & Homelessness Conference in Phila- 
delphia (right). 



All pictures by SSA. 



194 




CIVITAN CLUB 




195 



PHI MU ALPHA 



AND 



DELTA OMICRON 




*$&£$$ 



"Being an only child, I feel 
like I have the brothers I nev- 
er had In Phi Mu Alpha, and 
the sisters I never had as a 
Big Brother of Delta Omi- 
cron," said Bryan Black, Pres- 
ident of Phi Mu Alpha. 
From rush dancers to Step 
Sing, Phi Mu Alpha, the music 
fraternity for men, and Delta 
Omicron, the music fraternity 
for women, jointly pursued 
the furtherance of music on 
Samford's campus while 
keeping their separate iden- 
tities Intact. 

Starting the year off right, Phi 
Mu Alpha had its largest 
pledge class in several 
years. Through the many 
weeks of pledging, each 
probationary member, or 
worm, carried a black note- 
book everywhere he went 
and used only sidewalks to 
cross campus. After becom- 
ing members, the old and 
new brothers participated in 
Step Sing and danced to the 
sounds of "Vacation" and 
"Kokomo." 

Phi Mu Alpha ended the year 
well with a joint recital with 
formal, "The Magnolia Ball," 
at the Arlington House. 
Delta Omicron initiated four 
pledges at the end of the fall 
semester. Rush functions 
started the same week as Phi 
Mu Alpha so the dance 
"Around the World" was held 
together at the end. 
Like Phi Mu Alpha, the sisters 
of Delta Omicron sang and 
danced on the "Vacation 
Step Sing show to the beat of 
songs like "Escapade." 
The spring pledge class was 
much larger. Eleven girls 
pledged In the spring carry- 
ing their "rat" books and 
wearing pins all over cam- 
pus. 

Participating in the Spring 
Recital with the sisters and 



attending the "Starry, Starry 
Night" formal held at Pick- 
wick Place, the pledged 
finally became sisters them- 
selves the last day of class- 
es. 

Both groups have been 
changing their images and 
focusing themselves more 
strongly over the past few 
years, making this year the 
best yet for music fraternities 
at Samford. 



The sisters of Del- 
ta Omicron 



The brothers 
Phi Mu Alpha 



of 




All pictures by Tiffany Towntend 



196 



OUTDOOR RECREATION 



The Wilderness Act of 1964 states: 
t "A wilderness is hereby recognized 
' as an area where the earth and its 
L community of life are untrammeled 
y by man, where man himself Is a vis- 
itor who does not remain." Outdoor 
Recreation, an organization found- 
ed in 1984 by true nature lovers, is 
committed to bringing this wilder- 
ness closer and closer to the stu- 
dents of Samford University. 
Outdoor Rec. is led by a group of 
students who are trained in outdoor 
skills, such as camping, repelling 
and other activities. These "core" 
members are responsible for mak- 
ing everything go smoothly and 
safely on a trip. In spite of its or- 
ganizational structure, Outdoor 
Rec. is still mostly a group of col- 
lege students who love the out- 
doors and leading other students 
Into the wilderness. 
Where do they lead you? Outdoor 
Rec. Is perhaps most well-known for 
the activity of repelling. Another 



fun and exciting thing they do is 
spelunking(cave-exploring) — un- 
officially known as caving. Besides 
these two fun sports, Outdoor Rec. 
also goes canoeing, white-water 
rafting, and rock-climbing. 
An old buzz phrase with this excit- 
ing student-led organization was, 
"It's not what we do, but why we do 
it." What would compel a relatively 
normal human being to jump of a 
cliff? Or roar down a river? Outdoor 
Rec.'s central theme is found in 
Romans 8:39: "Nor height nor 
depth, nor anything else in all cre- 
ation can separate us from the love 
of God in Christ Jesus our Lord." 
Outdoor Rec. is intensely preparing 
for another good year at Samford. 
All the core members are sharpen- 
ing their skills so that they can bet- 
ter and more efficiently serve the 
Samford student body. But no mat- 
ter what changes the future brings 
to Outdoor Rec, their purpose will 
always remain the same: 



"Being convinced that nothing in 
all creation can separate us from 
the love of God, and knowing that 
the outdoors brings out the true 
side in all of us, we are committed 
to sharing the love of our Saviour 
and Lord Jesus Christ wherever we 
are, whether that be in a cave, on 
the rocks, or on the way to class. As 
Paul said to the Colossians: 
'Naturally we proclaim Christ! We 
warn everyone we meet and teach 
everyone we can all that we know 
about Him so that we may bring 
every man up to his full maturity in 
Christ. This is what we are working 
and struggling at with all the 
strength that God has put in us.' " 

Lisa Hale 




All Pholot be Andy Ruble 

Tina Brooks , Bill Yarborough, Jim Coffman and Pin Nickles have a blast on the Little Cahaba 
river. 




Chad Harris and Paul Bushman learn to bound at 
Cheaha Park on a 90-100M repell. 



197 



SPANISH CLUB 



Along with the extra 
credit a Spanish stu- 
dent can get from at- 
tending Spanish club 
meetings is a view of 
how the language is 
used in action. Students 
can hear interesting 
missionaries tell about 
their experiences in ex- 
otic places such as Ar- 
gentina and Spain. Stu- 
dents can also hear 
their peers share stories 
of tears and laughter 
from their life-changing 
experiences as mis- 
sionaries in the Rio 
Grande River Ministry. 
Exciting opportunities 
for Spanish study in 
Mexico, Costa Rica and 
Spain are also illustrat- 
ed through other stu- 
dents' colorful depic- 
tions of their adven- 
tures in these foreign 
lands. 

Spanish club mem- 
bers support the "Lan- 
guage Mission Fund" 
through the sale of de- 
licious, chocolate Ad- 
vent calendars and the 
Rio Grande River Minis- 
try with proceeds from 
the sale of refresh- 
ments at Samford's an- 
nual Step Sing show. 
During Samford's Fall 



Andrea DeMarino (top) explains a fund-raising idea for mis- 
sions. 



Brad Waller, Tony Boyd, Judd Hendrix and Shannon Hage sing 
"En la noche, los pastores velan" at the Christmas Around the 
World Convo. 



Carnival, Spanish club 
members raise money 
for summer missions by 
selling spicy, hot 
nachos. A handsome 
"cabellero" may even 
be spotted wearing a 
sombrero at the booth! 

Christmas festivities 
at Samford also in- 
clude a special convo- 
cation in which Spanish 
club members sing with 
other language stu- 
dents. Spanish students 
can be heard singing 
"Noche de paz," or 
"night of peace," 
which is more common- 
ly known as "Silent 
Night." 

Officers during the 
1990-91 year were An- 
drea DeMarino, presi- 
dent; Dee Fowler, vice- 
president of programs; 
Robert Beasley, vice- 
president of projects; 
and Donald Cason, 
secretary/treasurer. The 
officers worked under 
the guidance of Dr. 
Myralyn Allgood and 
Miss Lorna Abies to pro- 
vide interesting club 
activities. Oh, and do 
not forget the extra 
credit!! 



Andrea DeMarino 




All pictures by Spanish Club. 







198 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



On May 3, 1941, the Gamma Chi chap- 
ter of Alpha Phi Omega was founded at 
Samford University. In 1991, the current 
brothers celebrate 50 years of service 
by continuing to uphold their triumvirate 
of cardinal principles: Leadership, 
Friendship and Service. 

Alpha Phi Omega's founders included 
such notable names as Harwell G. Davis, 
Percy Burns, John Pittman, and Ray Atch- 
ison. One of the brothers' first service 
projects was building mailboxes for the 
students at the old Eastlake campus. 

That tradition of service continues to- 
day. Alpha Phi Omega carries out its 



charge of service through projects such 
as the Red Cross blood drive, the used 
book store, and the What/When 
calendars located on the cafe tables. 
The brothers work with Habitat for Hu- 
manity, Inner City Missions, and Urban 
Ministries. They also volunteer to help at 
events like the Special Olympics and 
the Multiple Sclerosis Super City Walk. 

As the brothers look into the next 50 
years, they remember the words of W. 
Grenfell, "The service we render to oth- 
ers is really the rent we pay for our room 
on this Earth." 





Pledge brothers Mike Jones, Daniel Cauble, Zippy Quick 
and Matt Mitchell hide the fraternity bell from the brothers. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA: (First row) Mark Rowe, Craig Hyde, 
(Second row) Greer Milam, Lee Dymond, Bob Cantlay, Dan 
Cauble, Tim Whltlock, Jason Sutton, Victor Clark, (Third row) 
Rachel Beckett, Sheri Jackson, Tom Briscoe, LeAnn Young, 
Andrea Green, (Fourth row) Troy Hupp, Bruce Powers, David 
Brooks, Jon VanDyk, Jeff Quick, Brian Randies, Mike Jones, 
Brian West, Scott Goodwin. 



All pictures by Alpha Phi Omega. 




199 







200 





Frlsbe© is a "quad" favorite in the spring. 




Students relieve the stress of school in 
many different ways but for freshman Lisa 
Bishop she enjoys relaxing to her own 
music. 




Dana White takes a short break from all 
the dancing at the Welcome Back Dance. 



201 



Abernathy-Beckett 



Pam Abernathy JR 
Reglna Abner FR 

Jennifer Abreu FR 
Melodi Adair SR 

Melissa Adams SO 



Jennifer Admire FR 
Jennifer Aldridge FR 
Austin Alldredge SR 

Kimberly Allen FR 
Kent Altom SO 



Teresa Alvarado SO 
James Anderson SO 
Julie Anderson FR 
Lynda Anderson FR 
Tammy Anderson JR 



Diane Annunzaita FR 
Jennifer Aristorenas 
SR 

Roland Athouris SO 
Scott Austin JR 

Tracy Bachman JR 



Autumn Baggott SO 
Jeana Bailey 5SR 
Dean Bankes SO 
Brandon Banks JR 
Steve Barfield SR 



Kristie Bartlett JR 
Lisa Bates SR 
Mark Bates SR 
Mark Bear FR 

Rachel Beckett SR 




202 



EXPANSION WESTWARD 

A shift in housing caused a stir 
among dorm residents this 
year. 

Among the new developments 
on campus were the construc- 
tion of a new Sigma Chi House, 
a dorm to house independent 
males, a Phi Mu House, and a 
house to be shared by the 
members of Delta Zeta and 
Sigma Nu. The former Crawford 
Johnson Residence Hall for 
males will no longer house stu- 
dents. 

New housing for fraternity and 
sorority members was met with 
excitement and approval. Del- 
ta Zeta's President Martie Nor- 



^^^^^ 


PI 


gw 


itoy 


iwnifl 

ii 


m 


_ .. . mm 4 «■ 
■ '1*it HH ■ 




;• 




^ 


v Tk'^% •• '•£*-: 








Donna Kern 



man was filled with anticipa- 
tion after consulting their 
architect, "We had thought 
we'd have to wait, and when it 
all came into place, it was 
wild. It's amazing how all this 
has come about." 
The new expansion westward 
is sure to strengthen the al- 
ready close ties among frater- 
nity and sorority members. 
Dana Daniels, a sister of Phi 



The Sigma Chi's 
move out of their 
house and await 
a new one. 



Mu, expressed the advantages 
of their new house eloquently, 
"The house will provide a 
source of never-ending mid- 
night doughnut excursions, as 
well as energetic running 
mates. But most of all, there 
will be a plentiful supply of sis- 
ters who will comfort and en- 
courage each other when 
things get tough." 




Daniel Bell JR 
Roger Bell SR 
Tisha Bennett FR 
Michael Benson FR 
Julie Benton SR 



Danny Bernstein FR 
Sandra Betts FR 
Rhonda Bigbee SO 
Lisa Bishop FR 
Bryan Black SR 



Edward Black JR 
Judy Blair JR 
Christie Blanton FR 
Jennifer Blaszezynski FR 
Christopher Blazer 



203 



Bordener-Burkeen 






Jennifer Bordener FR 

Leslie Boyd SR 

Amy Box SO 

Nicola Bradbum FR 

Mark Brewer FR 



Leslie Brewton FR 

Erin Lee Brian SR 

Kimberly Bridges JR 

Thomas Briscoe SR 

David Brooks FR 



Merry Brooks FR 
Belinda Brown SR 
Carol Brown SO 
Cathy Brown JR 
James Brown FR 



Leigh Brown SR 

Robert Brown 

Sharon Brown SR 

Steven Brown SO 

Suzanne Brown SR 



Tonya Brown JR 
Catherine Bryan SR 

Cheryl Bryson SR 
Evelyn Buchanan SR 

Chip Buckner SR 



Jenna Bufce SR 
Gary Bullock SR 
Lyndsey Burk SO 
Tammy Burke SR 
Christy Burkeen SR 




204 



Burleson-Capeheart 




MaryJo Burleson FR 

Ronnie Burton JR 

Celeste Burton 



Dana Burton 
David Bush SR 
April Butsch JR 



Beverly Calderon SR 
Angela Calhoun JR 
Calvin Calloway FR 



Melinda Callaway SO 

Risa Callaway FR 

Lisa Camino FR 



Courtney Camp FR 

Erin CampFR 

Scott CampSR 



John Cannoy, Jr SR 

Julie Cantrell SO 
Darren Capeheart FR 



205 



Careathers-Clewell 



Angela Careathers 
SSR 

Tina Cargile 5SR 

Jennifer Carr FR 

Shannon Carr SO 

Joy Carroll SR 



Marcy Carroll JR 

Andrea Carter SR 

John Carter SO 

John Carter SO 

Sabrina Carter SR 



Scott Carter FR 
Cresha Cason SO 
Donald Cason SR 

Kelly Cates FR 
Christ) Cawood JR 



Kimberly Chambless 

SR 

Clinton Chapman SR 

Amy Cheek FR 

Jenny Cherry SO 

Carol Christian JR 



Lyn Christian SO 

William Chual JR 

Amy Christmas JR 

Tim Clad SO 

Alicia Clark FR 



Deanna Clark SR 
Brad Clay FR 

Kathy Clayton FR 
Stacy Cleary FR 
Amy Clewell FR 




;^&^^i^ 






206 






CAFETERIA 



Students continued to meet caf- 
eteria cuisine tentatively this 
year. The general concensus was 
that good food was found off 
campus. Yet making it to the 
drink machine at lunch often 
equipped students with the abil- 
ity to make it through Manhattan 
at rush hourl 

Despite the food, the Caf. con- 
tinues to be well-loved by 
Samford students. It's the only 
place on campus where students 
can go daily and see all their 
friends at once. Students love to 
socialize and the Caf. is a haven. 
There are those who come at its 
opening and stay until after its 
closing, watching people come 



and go and chatting with whom- 
ever comes by. 

For Parents' Weekend, the Caf. 
outdid itself, serving tasty 
burgers and fries in '50's style. 
During the Christmas season, Val- 
entine's Day, Halloween, and 
Thanksgiving, the Caf. was 
decked out in appropriate de- 
cor. Dick Tracy, Scarlett O'Hara 
and Santa Claus were among the 
faces to grace our Caf. during 
these occasions. 
Whatever shortcomings it may 
have, the Caf. helps bring stu- 
dents together. And it is sure to 
keep its unique place in the 
blend of Samford life. 




Jennifer Cobb FR 
Steve Cobb SR 
Carissa Cole FR 
Kendra Cole JR 
Lauren Colley SO 



Ann Collier FR 
Francis Collins SO 
Andrea Colvln FR 
Nia Coon FR 
Claire Cormany FR 



Tracy Courcelle FR 
Susan Cowart SO 
Marcia Coyle JR 
Kelly Crowder FR 
Christy Crow SO 



207 



Daniel-Eager 



Dana Daniel SO 

Laura Daniel FR 

Crysta Daniels JR 

Sarah Davidson FR 

Dana Davis JR 



Stacey Davis SO 

Susan Davis JR 

Pam Deale JR 

Catherine Deason JR 

Christopher Deering 

JR 



Sumter DeGaris JR 
Khristan Deichert FR 
Andrea DeMarino SR 

Mark Denny FR 
Suzanne DiCarlo JR 



Andrew Dier SR 

Brock Dietz SO 

Stephen Dillard JR 

Scott Dillon FR 

Kathie Dobra JR 



Jack Downing SR 

Tamara Downing SR 

Stanley Duke SO 

Chris Dunlap SR 

Page Dunlap SR 



Jenny Dunn SO 
Steven Dunn FR 
Missy Durrett SR 
Hope Dutton SO 
Melanie Eager FR 




208 




Alison Early SR 
Chad Eaton FR 
Cynthia 
Edwards SO 



Michael Ent SR 

Kari Erlckson 

FR 

Christen Eudy 

JR 



Amy Evans JR 
Janet Evans SR 
Mark Evens FR 



Robin Farmer 
JR 

Debbie 
Fawley JR 
Lucinda 
Ferguson SR 



Kelly Fields SO 

Lauren Fields 

SR 

Lisa Fields FR 



Casey 

Fitzsimons SO 
Samuel Fitts SR 
Melissa 
Fleagle SR 



WHAT'S 
IN/WHAT'S OUT 

What's In/What's Out? Perhaps this is a 
matter of personal preference. Howev- 
er, the students have adopted its own 
ideas of what's cool and what's not. 
In the area of music, taste varies. Pretty 
much gone are the days of Rap, al- 
though occasionally the low rider truck 
pursues the campus shaking the earth 
with its BOOMING sounds of MC Ham- 
mer. Now, the progressive style is a pop- 
ular form of music for students. This in- 
cludes groups such as REM, the Cure, the 
Church, and Alarm. Also the Black 
Crowes came onto the scene and seem 
to have taken over with "Light Your Can- 
dle." 

Favorite movies of the year have been 
the thrillers "Silence of the Lambs" and 
"Sleeping with the Enemy," with every- 
one's favorite "pretty woman" Julia 
Roberts, as well as Kevin Costner's 
"Dances with Wolves." No longer is the 
Brat Pack in, although movies like 
"Breakfast Club," "Pretty in Pink," and 
"St. Elmos Fire" will always remain 
favorites. 

The fashion style of Samford is pretty 
self-evident. Unisex clothing seems to 
be the trend. Both guys and girls feel 
comfortable in a pair of cutoffs and a t- 
shirt. Umbro shorts have also proved to 
be a favorite. And, of course, the ever- 
classic Polo shirt never seems to go out 
of style. 

On the other hand, gone are the days of 
fluorscent clothing. Muted colors, like 
golds and browns, seem to be more the 
trend. Then there is black and white — 
two colors (or are they colors?) that will 
never become obsolete. Let's not for- 
get, however, that white shoes should 
not be worn after Lobor Day or before 
Easter. (This is an unwritten law of the 
Southl) 

Ashley Leech 



209 



Ford-Grabe 



Douglas Ford 
Angela Foster SR 
Melissa Foster SO 
Travis Fowler SO 
William Fowler SR 



Luke Frady JR 

Deborah Franklin FR 

Steven Franklin FR 

Heather French SO 

Mary Friday SO 



Karen Froehlich FR 

Susan Furey SO 
Rachelle Gable SO 
Melissa Gachet SR 
Angela Gaines SR 



Jamie Gaither JR 
Ranel Galvez SR 

Angela Gaston JR 

Juan Gautier FR 

Steffanie Gentry FR 



Jennifer Gillespie FR 

Honey Gilmore SR 

Eugenia Glenn SO 

Dion Glover JR 

Jane Glover FR 



Aaron Goodall JR 

Debra Gordon SO 

Jill Gordon FR 

Russell Gore FR 

Scott Grabe FR 




210 



SPRING BREAK 



The anticipation began af- 
ter Christmas break and 
grew almost unbearable as 
Spring Break neared. Adven- 
tures were planned, suit- 
cases were packed, high- 
ways (Florida-bound 
highways, in particular) 
were covered with cars 
bearing Samford stickers, 
and finally parking lots and 
dorms were left vacant. 
Playing on the beach, par- 
ties, visiting, staying out late 
nights, sleeping late morn- 
ings, cruising and relaxing 
— these all relieve stress 
and rejuvenate students to 
finish the semester. 




The brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha express their love for spring break. 




Christopher Granberry JR 
Stacy Grassa FR 
John Green SR 
Melanie Green FR 
Melissa Green JR 



Kimberly Grissom JR 
Randy Grove SO 
Jason Guelgen FR 
Carol Guthrie SO 
Leah Guy FR 



Lynn Hadden SO 
Shannon Hage SO 
Kent Hale GRD 
Tony Hale JR 
Jim Hamil JR 




211 



Hankins-Holcomb 



Michelle Hankins JR 

Laura Haralson SR 

Katie Hardin SR 

Amy Harrell SO 

Brad Harris FR 



Charles Harris SO 

Holly Harris FR 

Steve Harris FR 

Jessica Harrison SO 

Rhenda Hawkins JR 



Jennifer Hayes SO 
Robert Hederman FR 

Amy Heise FR 
Andrea Henderson 
FR 
Becky Hendricks SO 



LeighAnna Henry FR 
Natalie Hernandez 
SR 

Stephen Hess SR 

Heather Hicks SO 

Kristie Hicks JR 



Ross Higgins JR 
Jennifer Highlander 
FR 

Dalva Hill FR 

William Hill SO 

Marcie Hinton SR 



Jason Hobbs FR 
Brenda Hodgson SO 

Derek Hogan JR 

Brooke Holbert SO 

Lisa Holcomb FR 




212 



X£^fc t- 


Judson Hough 




FR 


w VI 


Cheryl 


jfl -- *"■ ¥ ^B^ 


Houston JR 




Jennifer 




Houston SO 







Ronnie Hood 
JR 

Jennifer 
Horner JR 
Cindy 
Horsfield SR 



Julia How SO 
Chandra 
Howard SO 
Eva Hudson SR 



Heather 
Hudson SO 
Ruth Hudson 
FR 

Shijuana 
Hudson SR 



Shane Huff FR 
Andy Hughes 
FR 

Camille 
Hughes FR 





m 


Dixie Hughes 
SO 


-^B 




Melissa 






Hughes FR 
Paul Hughes 
SO 



WEEKENDS 



Various Options 

As the week heads to a close, stu- 
dents are ready to take a break 
from studies and enjoy the "real" 
college lifel But what is there to do? 
There is no typical weekend at 
Samford. Students take off into the 
city and explore it's "night life." 
Many students can be found at the 
$.95 midnight movie (or trying to 
sneak into another movie!) Other 
popular forms of recreation are 
Show-Biz Pizza, where a college kid 
can be a kid, or putt-putt golf. 
As the school year continues to roll 
around, Samfordites can be found 
trying to catch the sun's rays on top 
of Vail Dorm — Samford's very own 
VAIL BEACH. And what happens 
when the rain comes? Never fear, 
since a popular past-time is the tan- 
ning bed. Many a student can be 
found "faking and baking". 
And for those students who decide 
not to stay and experience this, a 
"Roadtrip" Is In order. Many stu- 
dents pack up and head towards 
home or other universities for a 
weekend of fun or relaxation. 

Ashley Leech 




Tommy Land, Tyler Bruce, Matt Browning, and Mark 
Majors relax at the lake on one of the many ex- 
citing weekends. 



213 






Humphrey-Julich 



Denlse Humphrey JR 

Marlayne Hunt SO 

Neal Hutchens FR 

Diana Huynh JR 

Craig Hyde FR 



Tina Hyde GRD 

Renee Hyland FR 

Lee Insko JR 

Jeff Jackson SR 
Sheri Jackson SR 



Scott Jackson FR 
Janice Jendrynski SR 

Louise Jensen JR 

John Jewell FR 

Deanna Johnson SO 



Rich Johnson SR 
Robert Johnson JR 

Traci Johnson FR 

Julie Johnston SR 

Stacie Johnston JR 



Susan Johnston FR 
Gary Joines JR 

Elizabeth Jones FR 
Irving Jones SR 
Jenny Jones FR 



Marsha Jones FR 
Steven Jones SR 
Warren Jones JR 
Brooke Jordan FR 
Rebecca Julich FR 




214 



Kash-Kolb 




Michael Kash SR 

Cynthia Kayton SO 

Cynthia Keen SO 

Tonaya Keller FR 

James Kelly SO 



Julie Kennett SO 

Michelle Kessel FR 

Jennifer Key FR 

Jennifer Killingsworth JR 

Carol King SR 



David King 
Lara King FR 
Paul King FR 
David Kitchens FR 
Joy Kolb FR 



215 



Koonce-Lobach 



Scott Koonce FR 
Julie Korte SO 

Susan Knight SO 

Linda Kohn FR 

Amir Lalib 



Pamela LaFon SR 

Denise Lamar FR 

Laura Lamb SO 

Melissa Landrum SO 

Paul Lanier FR 



Penny Langdon SR 
Gwenlynn Lanowy 
SR 

Jennifer Latham FR 
Teresa Lauence FR 
Ryan Lawrence SO 



Samantha Leather- 
land JR 

Laura Leazenby FR 
Shannon Lee FR 

Susan Lee FR 
Ashley Leech FR 



Aubrey Leonard 

Charles Lenard JR 

Rani Lesser SO 

Laura Lethbridge SO 

Susan Lightsey SR 



Ly Lim JR 

Elizabeth Lindley SR 

Todd Lindley JR 

Deandra Little FR 

Sheri Lobach SR 




216 




Cindi Long SR 

Darren Long 

SR 

Tony Lott JR 



Sheila Love SR 
Marcy Lowe FR 
Charles 

Lundquist FR 



Susan Lynch 
SO 

Samantha 
Lysle FR 
Martin 
Mantooth FR 



Scott Marbut 

JR 

Amy Marler FR 

Cheryl Martin 

SR 



Christine 

Martin SO 

Dlone Martin 

SO 

Bart Mason FR 



Christy Mason 
SR 

Kimberly 
Mason JR 
Michelle 
Matthews SO 



HOWARD'S 

Beginning in the fall, the SGA de- 
cided to start booking bands at 
Howard's at least once a month. 
The purpose of this decision was to 
provide a nightclub atmosphere 
here on campus. The SGA saw a 
need and developed a way to 
meet it because the few clubs in 
Birmingham are not open to those 
under 21. 

"It's become a Thursday night tra- 
dition," said Mary Prugh, SGA mem- 
ber in charge of the night life at 
Howard's. 

The types of music the bands 
played varied from progressive to 
country. 

"I went all the time in the fall and 
thought Howard's was great — es- 
pecially 'Mel and the Party Hats,'" 
said Ian Thompson. 
Also successful were the talent 
shows both semesters which gave 
students an opportunity to display 
their gifts. 

Of course, not everyone was sat- 
isfied. One student commented, 
"They give it a good try." 
But the harder the SGA tries and the 
longer the tradition continues, the 
more successful they will be. 

Tiffany Townsend 




Matt Johnston and Janey Rowlett dance til 
they sweat to the beat of "Mel and the Party 
Hats" 



217 



McBrayer-Mikula 



Juanell McBrayer FR 
Scott McBrayer JR 
Tracey McCarter FR 
Robert McClurkan FR 
Jeremy McClug- 
gage FR 



Scot McCoshFR 

Amy McCoy FR 

Krista McDaniel FR 

Marty McDill 

Danielle McDowel 

JR 



Jennifer McDowell 

FR 

Joe McEachin SO 

Amy McFee SO 

Marcey Mclnnis FR 

Valerie McKitt FR 



April McLean SO 
Michelle McMinn SR 
Lisa McNeal SO 
Peggy McNiel JR 
David McRae SR 



Evan McWhorter SR 

David Meador SO 

Jamie Mehdor JR 

Elizabeth Meeks FR 

Heather Meincke JR 



Lance Metcalf SR 
Mindy Metzler FR 

Sabrina Mezick SR 
Mary Mick FR 

Michelle Mikula FR 




218 



Miller-Morrow 




Laura Miller SO 

Scott Miller SR 

Trisha Miller JR 

Klmberly Millhorn FR 

Daphne Mitchell SR 



David Mitchell JR 
Jere Mitchell SR 
Matt Mitchell FR 
Michelle Mohr JR 
Julie Montgomery SR 



Betty Moore SR 

Shannon Morris FR 

Christy Morrison FR 

Allison Morrow SO 

Karen Morrow SR 






219 



Moss-Pagan 



Kimberly Moss FR 

Cal Mostella SO 

Michael Mozingo SR 

Holly Mullen FR 

Paige Munson SO 



Beth Myatt JR 
Andrew Myers JR 
Jennifer Nance FR 
Rebecca Neal FR 

Rob Nelson SR 



Mandy Newman SR 

Mark Newman JR 

Lori Nichols FR 

Michael Nichols FR 
Jill Nicholson JR 



Natalie Nipper SR 
Brandon Niven FR 

Amy Nixon FR 
Leslie Norman SR 
Martie Norman SR 



Joseph Nowell SR 
Lisa Oliphant FR 
Brett Opalinskl FR 
Annemarie Orr SR 
Stephanie Orr SR 



Ismary Osaba JR 

Kenya Osburne JR 

Laura Owen FR 

Man/Ann Owenby FR 

Alicia Pagan JR 




220 




Chanssa 

Palmer SO 

Jerelyn Parker 

JR 

William Parker 

SR 



Elizabeth 

Parrent SR 

Bhavna Patel 

JR 

Frank Patrick 

FR 



John Patton FR 
Todd Payne JR 
Kimberly 
Pelletier SO 



Tara Pelz JR 
Michelle 
Pender FR 
Carol 
Pennington SR 



Hayes Perdue 
SO 

Kathy Phelps 

JR 

Daniel Phillips 

FR 



Jason Phillips 

SO 

Randall Poe 

FR 

Cara Pollard 

FR 



i.'v- ' iUd 



A YEAR OF 
PLANNING 

Detailed planning of the Sesqui- 
centennlal celebration began this 
year with much excitement on be- 
half of students and adminstration. 

A tribute to the distinguished, 
150-year heritage of the university 
was to continue throughout 1991 
and 1992 with various activities and 
events which would immerse stu- 
dents in the culture and heritage of 
the university. 

The Sesqulcentennial logo, "For 
God, For Learning, Forever," was 
adopted and would continue as 
the theme throughout the Sesqui- 
centennial. 

The year began with a kick-off 
convocation on January 23, in 
which historical relics of the univer- 
sities past were exhibited for the 
students and administration. Later, 
on May 5, historical relics were 
placed on display in various fre- 
quented University locations. 

The Sesqulcentennial Student 
Committee played a vital role in 
the success of the commemora- 
tion. The Sesqulcentennial Student 
Committee has devoted a consid- 
erable amount of time to planning 
activities and organizing details 
which helps to make the Sesqulcen- 
tennial celebration run smoothly. 
Jennifer Smith is the general chair 
of the committee. Its other mem- 
bers include Holly Howell, Leah 
Guy, Jason Sasser, Jason Phillips, 
Brian Waters, Kathy Clayton, Kristie 
Chandler, Catherine Allen, Scott 
Kaufman, Patrick Howell, John Car- 
ter, Christine Martin, Marta Tyree, 
Cindy Keene and Ande Under- 

(continued on page 223) 



221 



Powell-Rothermel 



Carl Powell SR 

Bruce Powers JR 

Jonathan Price SR 

Ann Jay Puckett SR 

Beth Pugh SR 



Krlsten Quails FR 
Forrest Quattlebaum 
JR 

Jeffery Qulett 

Gregory Racier JR 

Sarah Raley 



Andrew Ralph FR 

Amy Redd FR 
Andy Redmon SR 
Ann Redmon JR 
Ellen Redmon FR 



Rhonda Reed SO 
Jana Reeves JR 
Karen Reid JR 
Kimberly Rhodes JR 
Mary Katherine Rich- 
ards SR 



Suzann Richey SO 
Sheryl Rigsby SO 

Amy Rlngley FR 
David Roberts JR 

Tori Roberts SO 



Roxann Robinson SR 

Tasha Rohdy SO 

Karen Romlne SR 

Kenyon Ross JR 

Sherrle Rothermel SR 




222 



SESQUICENTENNIAL 




wood. 

In 1991, this committee launched the 
Sesquicentennial into action by spon- 
soring the White Heart Concert on April 
20, featuring a Christian rock band and 
also a visiting performing group from 
Australia, "The Scary Cats". The com- 
mittee also promoted several social 
functions for University supporters. They 
also spent hours laying the foundation 
for next year's events. 

All of this helps remind students and 
adminstration that they can savor the 
rich heritage of their university and 
know that they are a part of history in the 
making. 

Lynn Waldrep 



The Sesquicentennial Committee: Jennifer Smith, Holly Howell, Jason 
Phillips, Jason Sasser, Christine Martin, Scott Kaufman, Cindy Keene, 
Brian Waters, John Carter, Leigh Guy, and Kathy Clayton. 




Laurie Rowe FR 
Mark Rowe SO 
Justin Rudd SR 
Angee Rue FR 
David Russo JR 



Lori Ryce FR 
Sarah Saies SO 
Tricia Sanders SO 
Sharon Sawyer FR 
Stephen Sawyer SR 



Shannon Scarbough SR 
Candace Schilling SO 
Jennifer Schinman SR 
Michelle Schinman SO 
Glen Seay SR 



223 



Seay-Stephenson 



■ -m 



Monica Seay FR 

John Shafer FR 

Patrick Sheehan SO 

Tre Sheppard JR 

Bill Shiell FR 



Sumeet Shroff FR 
Dlanne Shoemake 
SR 

Kristy Shoun SO 

Lelia Siler JR 

Debra Silverstein FR 



Jacqueline Sisco SR 

Rob Skelton SR 

Donna Skipworth FR 

Scott Slate Sr 

Dean Smedley JR 



Christina Smith FR 

James Smith SR 

Jennifer Smith SR 

Jennifer Smith FR 

Marna Smith SO 



Marnl Smith SO 

Marta Smith SR 

Sid Smith FR 

Ben Sorrell SR 

Eric Spivey SR 



Kathyjo Spivey SR 
Tara Springfield SO 

Lisa Stagg SO 
Chad Steenerson FR 
Kristee Stephenson 
SO 








224 




Kara 

Stevenson FR 

Alisa Stokes 

SO 

Shelly Stookey 

FR 



Adrienne 
Sullivan FR 
Stacy Sullivan 
FR 

Jennifer 
Sylvester SR 



David Tate SR 

Tracy Taylor 

SR 

Lisa Teramo JR 



Elizabeth 

Tester JR 

Teresa Tester 

FR 

Karen Thomas 

JR 



Sara Thomas 

SR 

Scott Thomas 

SR 

Jowell Thome 

SO 



Cynthia 
Thompson SO 
Jennifer 
Thompson FR 
Michael 
Thompson FR 



LONDON 



When many students at Samford 
speak about a "well-rounded" educa- 
tion, they include the London Study Cen- 
tre in their definition. This opportunity is 
provided to 15 or 20 students each se- 
mester or for a two-week period in Jan- 
uary Term. 

Although the cost is slightly higher 
than a semester on campus, $2500 to 
$3000 more, it is an excellent price for 
spending three and a half months 
abroad. The price includes airfare, ac- 
comodations, meal allowances, two 
planned trips with the group, eight 
plays, and twelve hours of tuition. 

The Study Centre is located in the Roy- 
al Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, 
conveniently close to the London trans- 
portation system, or "tube." The possi- 
bilities of cultural expansion are limit- 
less. 

Dana Funderburg, who participated in 
the London experience in the fall of 1990 
enjoyed herself so much she stated, "I 
didn't want to leave." 

One of her favorite classes was 
"Victorian London," which highlighted 
the reign of this influential queen. Re- 
membering the professor-in-residence 
at the time of her trip, she said "My ex- 
perience was better because of Dr. Bag- 
gett." 

Tiffany Townsend 




Mark Bagged, Amy Sfyers, Greg O'Barr, Liesl Bolln. Missy 
Stokes, Mary Beth Hill, Dana Funderburg, Kim Younce, Darren 
Dobbins, Carrie Woods, Jenny Gregory, Cella Baggett, Evan 
Baggett, Michelle St. John, Lee Ann Samples, Alan Baggett, 
Klmberly Daniels, Latrlcia Patton, LeAnne Owen ,Mary Anne, 
Sandra Baggett, Wendy Whltehurst, and Christopher Newton 
stop in Paris as one of their many excursions. 



225 



Jennifer Thorn FR 

Carrie Tillis FR 

Jesse Tilton FR 

Paul Touliatos JR 

Tiffany Townsend FR 



Holly Travis SO 
Michelle Tripp JR 

Amy Trlvette JR 
Sherri Troxclair SO 

Todd Tucker JR 



Jamie Tuning JR 

Ande Underwood JR 

Jon VanDyk SR 

Rebecca Vann SR 

Kristi Vaughn SR 



Mark Vaughn JR 
Angie Vineyard JR 

Tara Vise JR 
Brent Wadsworth SR 

Julie Walden FR 



Valita Waldrep FR 

Gordon Walker SR 

Sandra Walker SR 

Carolyn Wall JR 

Charles Wall SR 



Chuck Wall SR 

Bradley Waller SR 

Danielle Walther SR 

Christopher Waters 

JR 

Tracy Watson FR 







226 



Weaver-Zukoski 




Krista Yates JR 
Martina Zukoski FR 



Michael Weaver JR 

Renee Weaver SO 

Mark Webb SR 

Claire White FR 

Dana White SR 



Geoffrey White FR 

Michael Westveer SR 

Amy Williams SR 

Chere Williams FR 

Kasandra Williams SR 



Tina Williams JR 

Jennifer Willis SR 

Matthew Willis SO 

Savanna Wills JR 

Stephanie Wilkerson SR 



Beth Wilson JR 

Ellen Witt JR 

Doug Wood FR 

Jason Wood FR 

Kimberly Wood JR 



Steven Wood SR 

Arnold Woodfln JR 

Lee Ann Woosley FR 

Sandy Wright SR 
Angela Wyatt 



227 



Austin, Scott 



98 
202Benton, Julie 



A 



B 



203Brooks, Anthony 
20, 
98, 203Brooks, David . . 



Bernstein, Danny 

Betts, Sandra . . 
Bigbee, Rhonda 



Bachman, Tracy 



187 Baggett, Alan 
/|28 Baggett, Celia 



Abbott, Jason . 
Abee, David . . 

Abemathy, Pam no Baggett, Evan 
73, 75, 202 Baggett> Jim 

Abner, Regina 202 Baggett Mark 



Abreu, Jennifer 
Adair, Melodi . 



202 



Baggett, Sandra 



202 
225 



Birck, Carolyn 
Bishop, Lisa 



154,201 



^Black, Brian 
^Black, Br y Qn • 

oo5 Black ' Edward 
^ b Blackard, Beth 



. 107, 

202 Baggott, Autumn 
Adams, Melissa . . 98, 37 /J85 

101,128,202 Bai|ey|Jeana 
Admire, Jennifer . no Bailey, Melissa 

,? 2 Baker, Nancy 



•Blair, Judy . . 

^°Blanton, Christie 



203Brooks, Merry 
203Brooks, Otis . 
. . . Brooks, Tina . 
203Brown, Belinda 
162Brown, Carol 
41, 

203Brown, Cathy 
17Brown, Chris . 
203Brown, Emily . 
203 

186Brown, Eric . . 
203Brown, James 



101 



23, 203Brown, Jim . 
Blaszezynski, Jennifer Brown, Leigh 



Baker, Sheila 



Akins, Julie 155 

Aldridge, Jennifer ^Ballard, Bryan . 
... ... 2U ^Bankes, Dean . 

Alldredge, Austin^ ^Banks, Brandon 

.' 187 

. 62 

. 202 

174, 

175 

59,61 

. 202 



Allen, Ches . 
Allen, David . 
Allen, Kimberly 
Allen, Randy 



Allen, Ted . 
Altom, Kent . . . 
Alvarado, Teresa 



;Banks, Timothy 
Barber, Scott . 

Barfield, Steve 
Baron, Buffy . . 
Barrentine, Molli 

Bartlett, Kristie 



202 _. 

2 ° 2 ~ m ~7'7?'! . 7 . . 203Brown! Mike 

j^Blazer, Chris . . . 128,Brown, Robert 

\ 6 /- 203Brown, Sharon 

^Bolin, Liesl 225 

^Bonner, Stephen . . . . Brown, Steven 

2 ^ 2 174Brown, Suzanne 

202 Booker, Pat .... 187 

117Boots, Sherri ... 7, 69Brown, Tonya . 

192, Borden, Amanda . . . Brown, Trisha 
193 117 

202Bordenet, Jennifer 



81 



108, 109, 204 



Browning, Matt 



166, 187,213 
213 



2 02 Basionmy, Khaled 



Anderson, James 



Anderson, Jon 
Anderson, Julie 



202 
166 
25, 



155, 202 



Bates, Lisa . . 
Bates, Mark 

Batie, Andrew 



101 



Anderson, Lynda 
Anderson, Mike 
Anderson, Tammy 



Anne, Mary .... 
Annunzaita, Diane 

Appelqvist, Joakim 

Applefield, Scott 



202 Batie, Marlene 
Baugh, Susan 
y~ n Bear, Mark . . 
Beard, Jeff . . 
2Q Beaule, Marc 
225Beck, Andrew 

Beck, Andy 
o n9 Beckett, Rachel 

199 
66 Belcher, Annie 
Bell, Dan ... 98 
y 7 4Bell, Daniel . . . 
Archer, Jeff . 71, 174^']. Robert . . 
Aristorenas, Jennifer Bell, Roger . 

202 B ©nder, Michelle 

Ash, Kristie 47 _ ^ 147 

Athouris, Roland .... ! enne ■ ? )c ! vld 

202 B ermett, Tisha . 

Auchmuty, Jimbo Benson, Michael 



40,Bourland, Ken . . 187Bruce, Tyler . . . 
155Bowling, Jimmy . 117Bryan, Catherine 
202 Box, Amy . . 108, 204 92, 98, 108, 109, 204 
• • • Boyd, Leslie .... 204Bryan, Sigurd . . 

187 Boyd, Tony 198Bryson, Cheryl . 

202 Bradbum, Nicola .... Buchanan, Evelyn 

98, 204 

202 Brandenburgh, Mark Buckner, Chip . . 

66, 65Buice, Jenna . . 



193 
96, 
204 
204 
117 
197 
204 
98, 
204 
204 
174 
38, 
163 

33 

98, 

204 

117 

204 

65 
204 

29, 
204 
204 

204 
204 

25, 
154 

65, 



117 
204 



67 Brannon, Pam 

186 

2 ^Brewer, John 
202B r ewer, Mark 

78 Brewton, Leslie 
256B r jan, Erin Lee . 
170 Brlck, Charlotte 
17 bridges, Kim . . 

2 2 Bridges, Virginia 

101 Briscoe, Tom 

203 



204 
204 
204 
204 



51, Bullock, Gary . . 

75Burdeshaw, David . . . 

113 180 

204Burk, Lyndsey ... 204 

204Burke, Tammy . . 204 

204Burkeen, Christy . 16, 

162 40, 204 

181, Burkes, Chris .... 159 

204Burleson, MaryJo . . . 

84, 205 

117Burton, Allan . 98,99 

199,Burton, Celeste . . 205 

204Burton, Dana . 



166Britchford-Steel, Erika Burton, Ronnie 

2 03 68Busby, Mark . . 

• • • Britt, Richard . . . 174,Bush, David . . 
158 175Bush, Jerre . . . 

165Brock, Marshall . . 65Bush, Vilira . . . 
203Brodnax, Margaret . . Bushman, Paul 

^Biitchfield, Dan 



. 205 
. 205 
. 105 
. 205 
69, 71 
. . 7 
. 197 
. 128 



228 



Butler, Scott 
Butsch, April 
Byrd, Susan 



C 



Calderon, Beverly 



78Carter, Lisa . . 

205Carter, Sabrina 

43Carter, Scott . 

Carter, Selina . 

Carter, Shannon 



Cartwright, Cal 
Cartwright, Michelle 



205 



Case, Jan 



Calhoun, Angela •■ Casey, Bonnie 

ka v ^ Cason, Cresha 

Callaway, Melinda ■ • Ca son, Donald 

zUo 



Callaway, Risa . 

Callow, James . 
Calloway, Calvin 

Calloway, Melinda 

Camino, Lisa 
Camp, Becky . 
Camp, Carla 
Camp, Christa 



"oV Caswell, Lyle 
2 °gCates, Kelly . 
, ,Cauble, Daniel 
66 99, 



2 QcCawood, Christi 



37,38 

. 206Cobb, Steve . 
. 206Coffman, Jim . 
. 117 
. 69,Coggins, Lonnie 

71 
. 62,Cole, Carissa . 
174 

Cole, Kendra . 
HCollette, Cameron 
117 

176Colley, Lauren . . 
206Collier, Ann . 
206Colllns, Alex . . 
59Collins, Brooke 
206Collins, David . 
98,Collins, Francis 
199Colvin, Andrea 
. 69,Colwell, Kristina 
71206 



101, 



Camp, Courtney 

40, 154, 205 

Camp, Erin 205 

Camp, John .... 98 
Camp, Scott ... 205 
Cannoy, John Jr 



Cantlay, Bob . 
Cantlay, Robert 
Cantrell, Julie . 
Capeheart, Darren 



.QQChambless, Kimberly Conyers, Donna 

205 206 

pgChancey, Rick . . 128Cook, Brian . . 

.^Chandler, Kristie . . . .Cook, Jason . . 

117Cook, Matt . . 



11, 
155 



Chapman, Clint 



207Daggett, Jason . . 71 

207Dalton, Rod ... . 78 

71,Daniel, Dana . . . 20 

197Daniel, Laura . . . 208 

. . . Daniels, Crysta . . 208 

17lDanlels, Kimberly 

93, 

207Davidson, Mark 

207 
. . Davidson, Sarah 

187 
. . 207Davis, Dana . . . 
98, 207 163, 208 

174Davis, Jennifer . . 128 

155Davis, Jetson 

147 

207Davis, Johnny 

207Davis, Paul . . 
. . Davis, Stacey 

128Davis, Susan . 
.... Deale, Pam . 

186Deason, Catherine . . 
77, 78 208 

. 164Deering, Christopher 

100 208 

101DeGaris, Sumter .... 



225 
65, 
169 

208 
98, 



118, 
128 
59 
98 
208 
208 
208 



205 



Chastain, Ann 
Cheek, Amy . 
Cherry, Jenny 
Christian, Carol 



128, 206Coon, Linda 



. . 49 208 

84,Coon, Nia 207Deichert, Khristan . . . 

128Coons, Julie 2 177,208,246 



. 98,Corey, Jennifer . 
206cormany, Claire 
5,51, 
62, 206courcelle, Tracy 



186DeMarino, Andrea . . 
198, 208 



199 
^Christian, Lyn 



98, 

206cowart, Susan 
206 

9,Coyle, Marcia 
• ■ 206 99, 128, 207Dietz, Brock . . 

^ Ub Chval, Billy . . 78, 206Creasman, Ann .... Dillard, Stephen 
Careathers, Angela C lad, Tim 206 117, 128 



205 



Christmas, Amy 



207Denny, Mark . . . 

. . . Derriso, Tony . . 

207DiCarlo, Suzanne 

186, 

207Dickson, Becky . 

98,Dier, Andrew . . 



Cargile, Tina 
Carlisle, Missy Jane 



2 ^CIark, Alicia 



206 
187 



Clark, Carrie 
Clark, Colquitt 



Clark, Deanna 



Carmon, Lee ... 117 
Carnley, Staci . . 29 
Carpenter, Christy 

29 ' ^D Clark ' V ' Ct0r 

IxiClay, Brad 



206Crosby, Kris . . . 
98,Crow, Christy . . 
10lCrowder, Kelly . 
117,Crumpton, Paulie 
128 

108,Culp, Charles 



176Dillon, Scott . . 

207Dobbins, Darren 

207 

. . . Dobra, Kathie . 

163 

76,Donlon, Tim 



Carr, Daphne 
Carr, Jennifer 
Carr, Shannon 
Carroll, Joy . 
Carroll, Marcy 

Carter, Andrea 

Carter, David 

Carter, John . 



• • 206 c|aybum( Crajg 

• ■ 206 Clayton, Kathy . 
. 186, 7 

206 Cleary, Stacy . . . 

«« 5r;Clemmensen, Jon 

98, 206 

n ~ ^'Clemmons, Russ . 
80, 165 

■ ■ 1 66'Clewell, Amy . . . 
206, 223 Cobb> Jennifer . 



109, 206 77, 78 
. • ■ 199Cunningham, David Dorough, John 
206 128Downing, David 



208 
71 

208 

26 

208 

208 

208 
208 

225 

. . 158, 

176,208 

. 59,60, 

61 

. . 78 



. . . Curlee, Jamie 
187Curtiss, Dustin 
206, 
223 
206 



117 

128 
206 
186, 



D 



174 117 

78Downing, Jack . . 208 
Downing, Tamara . . . 

208 
Driskill, Mark .... 170 
Duffey, Tina .... 118 
Duke, Stanley ... 208 
Dunlap, Chris ... 208 
Dunlap, Page . . . 208 
Dunn, Ashley . . . 153 
Dunn, Jenny .... 208 



229 



Dunn, Steven 
Durrett, Missy 
Dutton, Hope 

Duvall, Ruth 
Dwiggins, Lisa 
Dye, Mike . . . 
Dymond, Lee 



E 



208Flemlng, Stacy 
208Fllght, Richard 
186, Folds, Sonnie . 
208Ford, Douglas . 
Wort, Eric . . . . 
128Foster, Angela 
170Foster, Melissa 
199Foster, Tracy 
Fowler, Celeste 
Fowler, Travis . 



Eager, Melanie . 
Early, Alison . . . 
Eason, Olandus . 
Eaton, Chad . . . 
Edwards, Cynthia 

Edwards, Rebecca 

Ellis, Heather . . . 
Ent, Michael .... 
Erickson, Kari . . . 
Espy, Alan . . 33, 
Eudy, Christen . . 
Evans, Amy .... 
Evans, Janet . . . 
Evans, Mark . . 92 



Fowler, William 
Frady, Luke 
2n oFranklin, Deborah 

209 

59 

209 



186Gautler, Juan ... 69, 
59 71,93,210 

147Geat, Kim 186 

210Gentry, Steffanie 

166 

210Gillespie, Jennifer 

210 
59Gilmore, Honey 

159 
/|74 # Glascock, Dana . 

210 49, 152Hail, Sonya 



H 



210Hadden, Lynn 
210Hage, Shannon 



27, 
211 



210Hagins, Heather 



198,211 



128 
. 7 



26,41 
Franklin, Kenya . . 



209 



Franklin, Steven . 
Freeman, Darlene 



39 
98 



2ioGla$s, Chris . . 
2ioGlenn, Eugenia 

Glenn, Gena 
2ioGlover, Dion . . 
58,Glover, Jane . 

59 
, Godeury, Dominic 

210 

, Godfrey, Ann . . 
186Gonzalez, Gentry 



French, Heather 



• /,77 Hairston, Daphne . . . 
. 210 94 

109Hale, Chris 174 

7,210Hale, Kent 211 

186,Hale, Lee .... 14,62, 

210 154 

• -Hale, Tony .... 177, 

108 188,211 

118Haley, Brittany . . 66 

Hall, Ginger .... 73 



186, 



Evans, Tracie 
Evers, Lara . 



F 



2 9 Friday, Mary 
"T^Froehlich, Karen . 

209 Fryer, David . . . . 

209 Fulford, Kathy . . . 

209 Fuller, David . . . . 

- 93 'Fulmea, Jay . . . . 

f^Funderburg, Dana 
162 Qg 

^Furey, Susan . . . . 

Fury, Susan 

Fussell, Wendy . . 



210Goodall, Aaron 

210 

. Gordon, Debra 
210Gordon, Jill . . 

65Gore, Russell . . 

98Goss, Julian . . 
180Grabe, Scott . 



13, 164, 166Halstead, Andy 



154 



166, 247 
210Halterman, Kelli 
210 

210Hambrecht, Mike . . . 
210 187 

18lHamil, Jim . 120,211 
210Hankins, Michelle . . . 



187Granberry, Christopher 

21lHanson, Boyd 



225Grassa, Stacy . 
210Grate, Myrle . . 
186Green, Andrea 

66, 

67Green, John . . 



Fargarson, Angel . 7, 



Farmer, Robin . . . 
Fawley, Debbie 

101 
Fehlenberg, Stacy 

Ferguson, Lucinda 

Fields, Beth .... 
Fields, Kelly . 98, 
Fields, Lauren . . 

Fields, Lisa . 186, 
Finch, Trista .... 
Fitts, Samuel .... 
Fitzsimons, Casey 

174, 
Fleagle, Melissa . 

Fleming, David . . 



G 



162 
209 

™Gable, Rachelle . 
209 

■ • Gachet, Melissa 
83 

■ • Gadoury, Dominic 
209 108. 

^Gaines, Angela 
209 y 

154'Gaither, Jamie . 

209 Galvez, Ranel . . 

2 9 Ganett, Adrienne 

^Ganey, Debbie . 

209 Gann, Lee .... 

■ • ■ Gantt, Adrienne 
209 

44-Gamito, Randy . 
2 ~ 9 Gaston, Angela 



Green, Melanie . . 
Greene, Melissa . 

21lHarr 

Greenoe, Missy Harr 

113, 163Harr 



21 lHaralson, Laura 
4, 166 
. 20,Hardin, Heather . 

199 
. 98,Hardin, Katie . . . 

21lHarper, Matthew 
. 211 13, 174, 



■ • • Gregory, Jenny 
2 ^Griffon, Lee Carol 

2/ "- l Griffin, Cameron . 



Harrell, Amy . . 

s, Brad . . 
s, Chad . . 
s, Charles 
s, Holly . . 
s, Steve . . 
son, Jessica 



225Harr 

Harr 

^Harr 



12,212 

/ '67Hart, Alison 147 

^Hartley, Beth ... 71 

■ • •Hartrick, Kathy . . 128 

21 1 Harvey, Hub .... 102 

• 3, Harvey, John ... 174 

21 1 Haskins, Joel ... 59 

• • Hauser, Ann .... 98 

211 Hawkins, Ashly . . 25 

® 3 ;Hawkins, Rhenda 
• • 211 

165Guy, Leah ^Hawkins, Theresa 

18/Guy, Leigh ... 223 8 4, 128, 186 

Hayes, Jennifer . . 212 
Haynes, Deena . . 163 



109 Griffith, Leslie . . 
• ■ ■ Grissom, Kimberly 

210Grove, Randy . . 
210 

^Guelgen, Jason 
128 * 

78Guthrie, Carol 



210 



212 
174 

212 

159 
212 

175 
212 
212 
197 
212 
212 
212 



212 



230 



Haynes, Ken 



213 

213 

213 



I 



o'^leone, Michelle 
Ikner, Monica . 
2 ^Ingram, Chad 



174,Hood, Ronnie ... 213 93 

175Horner, Jennifer 

Hays, Sam 174 

Heaston, Heather . . . Horsfield, Cindy 

163 
Hederman, Robert . . Hough, Judson . 
93, 212Houston, Cheryl 
Heise, Amy .... 212 
Helms, Doug . . . 128Houston, Jennifer 
Helton, Nancy . . 128 

Henderson, Andrea . . How, Julia 213 ngram. Sherry 

212Howard, Calvin . . n8 lnsko ' Lee 
. . . Howard, Chandra 

65 
. . . Howell, Anita 
212Howell, Faye 
. . . 84,Howell, Holly 
128, 198Howell, Patrick 
Henry, LeighAnna ... 170, 

212Howell, Shannon 
Henry, Leslie .... 176Hube, Eric . 128, 
Herman, David . . 59Huchabee, Kim . 
Hernandez, Natalie . . Hudson, Eva . . . 

212Hudson, Heather 
. . 66 

. . 212Hudson, Mary . . 
. . 69,Hudson, Ruth . . 
71, 212Hudson, Shijuana 

. . 71 156, 157, 176, 213j en drynski, Jan . 

212Huff, Shane . 93,213 108,109 



, 214Jolnes, Gary 
Jones, Elizabeth 



186 

102 

164 

43 



Henderson, Greg 
Hendricks, Becky 
Hendrix, Jud . . . 



84, 128, 
214 



Herren, Bridget 
Hess, Stephen 
Hicks, Heather 

Hicks, Kristie . , 



66 213 ,re,anc '' Stephanie 

149, 

^glsom, Jerry 

223 
33, 
171 
. 2 
187 

2jackson, Jeff . 
213jackson, Scott 

• • • Jackson, Sheri 
213 

11 8 Jacobs. Brad . 
213jeffcoat, Jim . 



187 
187 



J 



Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jordan 

Jordan 

Jordan 

Jordan 



Irving . . 
Jenny 
Jerry . . 
Kelly . . 
Mamee 
Marsha 
Mike . . 
Steve . 
Steven 
Todd . . 
Vickie . 
Warren 
, Barrett 
, Brooke 
, Jeff . . 
, Mike 



Joyner, Lee . . 
214Julian, Dana . 
214Julich, Marvin . 
199, 
214Julich, Rebecca 

25 

164, 

166 



214 

214 

214 

214 

187 

75 

73 

214 

199 

128 

214 

181 

118 

214 

168 

214 

174 

192, 

193 

69, 71 

. . 3 

. 77. 

78 

214 



Hicks, Tammy 
Higgins, Ross 



186Hughes, Andy 

212 
Highlander, Jennifer Hughes, Camille 

63,212 

Hill, Chris .. 174, 175Hughes, Dixie .. 



Hill, Dalva 212 



92,jensen, Louise 
213jewell, John . . . 

213john, Michelle St. 
47, 



K 



214 
214 

2 ^Kaiser, Jeff 35 



162, 213johnson, Amy 



Hill, John .. 174, 175Hughes, Melissa 
Hill, Mary Beth . . 225 

Hill, Steve 147Hughes, Paul . 

Hill, William .... 212Hull, William . . 
Hinton, Marcie . . 98, Humphrey, Denise 

101,212 
Hltson, Jim . . 84, 128Humphreys, Heather 
Hixson, Julia .... 118 ^Johnson, Jay 



Kash, Michael 
225Kash, Mike . . . 
,,2gKaswell, Kyle . 
^Kaufman, Scott 



Johnson, Ben . . 
2 ^Johnson, Carolyn 
213 7, i28 Ka Y' Mar 9 aret 

1 ^Johnson, Chris . 

Johnson, Cindy 
2 y !4j h nson> Deanna 



174 

>,g 7 Kayton, Cynthia 



Hobbs, Jason . . 

Hodgson, Brenda 

Hogan, Derek . . 
Hogewood, Lynn 



187, Hunt, Marlayne 

212 

. . . Hunt, Paula . . 

212Hunter, Steven 

212Hurston, Martha 



152Hutchens, Neal 
63, Hutchinson, Joe 

174, 212Hutchinson, Neil 
. . 212Huynh, Diana . 
. . 164,Hyde, Craig . . 
181 

66,Hyde, Daryl . . 
67 
Homesley, Leigh Ann Hyde, Tina . . . 
66Hyland, Renee 



Holbert, Brooke 

Holcomb, Lisa 
Holley, Kevin . 

Holmes, Ronnie 



102,j onnson Jennifer 
214 

9 2johnson, Marty 
7 8johnson, Rich . 

186 

^Johnson, Rob . 

2 ^Johnson, Robert 
78 

66 Johnson, Traci 

214johnston, Julie 

^Johnston, Matt 
214 174 

174 Johnston, Stacie 

175 99, 128 

214johnston, Susan 
92, 



^^Keclik, Honzik . 
4>) Keene, Cindy . 

V 7 gKeller, Tonaya 

' g 9 Kelly, James . . 

^ Kennett, Julie . 

2>)4Kent, Oscar . . 

pyKern, Donna . . 

Kessel, Michelle 

214 

2 ^Key, Jennifer 

2/|4Kilgore, Laura 



215 
78, 79 
. 78 

223 
. 66, 
67 

' 215 

. 174 

215, 

223 

. 215 

. 215 

. 215 

. 187 

2, 154 

' 215 
. . 215 
. . 37, 
38, 185 



oyiyKillingsworth, Jennifer 

' 215 

V/i/Kim, Hannah .... 149 

Kinard, Kelli .... 152 

2 /|4King, Amy 29 



231 



King, Becky 
King, Carol 
King, David 
King, Eric . 
King, Lara 



166 
. 40, 



King, Paul . . 63, 

Kingren, Stacy . , 

Kinzer, Ed 

Kircus, Charlton 

Kirkley, Stephanie 



Kitchens, David 
Knight, Susan 
Knight, Tiffani 
Knox, Kathy . 
Kohn, Linda 
Kolb, Joy ... 
Koonce, Scott 
Korte, Julie . . 



L 



LaFon, Pamela 
Lakeman, Kaye 

Lalib, Amir . . . 
Lamar, Denise 
Lamb, Jamie 
Lamb, Laura . . 
Land, Tommy . 
Landrum, Melissa 



186Leduc, Pat 

215Lee, Shannon . . . 

215Lee, Susan 

247Leech, Ashley . . . 

154,Lenard, Charles 

215 

174, Leonard, Aubrey . 

215 

69, Leonard, Charles 

71 

78Lesser, Rani .... 
. . . Lethbridge, Laura 
174 
. . . Levan, Steve . . . 

26Lightsey, Susan . . 
215Lim, Ly . . . . 128, 
216Lindley, Elizabeth 
128 

75Lindley, Todd . . . 
216Little, Deandra . 
215 

216Lobach, Sheri 
216Long, Chuck 



Long, Cindi 
Long, Darren 
Lott, Tony . . . 
Love, Mark . . 
Love, Sheila . 
T^Lovvorn, Tray 
9 n 5 -Lowe, Angie . 



65Marbut, Scott . . . 
216 

216Markham, Matt 
216Marler, Amy .... 
. . . Marshall, Jennings 
216 

. . . Martin, Cheryl . . . 
216Martin, Christine . 



78,McGeehon, Bart .... 

217 37,38 

187Mclnnis, Marcey .... 

217 218 

. . McKinney, Rebecca 

. 128 
. 218 
. 218 
. 59 



119 

21 7McKitt, Valerie . 
. . . McLean, April . . 
217, 223McLean, Ed . . . 
128Martin, Dione . . . 217McMinn, Michelle 
216Martin, Linda ... 118 
. . . Martin, Suzanne . . . . McNeal, Lisa . . 
216 118, 176McNiel, Peggy . 

. . 71McRae, David . . 



218 
218 
218 
98, 



99, 101,218 



98, 
102 

218 

218 

73 



98 
216 



Lowe, Marcy 
Luce, Christine 



11 



Langdon, Penny 
Lanier, Mildred . 



216 

62 

216 

2^ ^Luster, Karen 

• Lynch, Susan . . 
216 Lysle, Samantha 



Lundquist, Charles 
93, 



M 



216 

36, 

37 

Lanier, Paul . 98, 216 

Lankford., Ross .174 

Lanowy, Gwenlynn . . 

216Macon, Don .... 
Larson, Kristen . . 92,Macurda, Chuck 

93, 96 34, 

Latham, Jennifer .... Maddox, Danny . 

216 

174Mahanes, Mike . . 

. . . Majors, Mark . . 

216 

. . . Malone, Karen . . 

216 

Mann, Ann Carol . 

216 

, . . Mantooth, Martin 

216 



78Martinez., Troy 
216Mason, Bart . . . 169, 
216 

. . . Mason, Christy . . 
216Mason, Kimberly . 
216 

186,Mathes, Susan . . 
216Matthews, Karen . 
216Matthews, Michelle 
,25, 

166McAlister, David , 
217 

217McBrayer, Juanell 
217 

59McBrayer, Scott , 
217 218,247 108,109,218 

128McCants, Dana . 19,Metzler, Mindy . . 218 
161 246Mezick, Sabrina 

2i7McCarter, Tracey . . . 
154, 193, 218Mick, Mary . . . 

188McCarty, Will ... 154Middleton, Mike 

, McCleney, John . 78 
217McCluggage, Jeremy Mikula, Michelle 

47 218 

2 i7McClurkan, Robert .. Milam, Greer . 

95, 218Miller, Laura . . 
2i7McCosh, Scott .. 69,Miller, Scott .. 
70, 71,93, 218Miller, Trisha . . 
McCoy, Amy ... 218 
McCreary, Ashley . . . Millhorn, Kimberly 

25 
McCuen, Matt .. 170Mitchell, Daphne 
McCutcheon, Karen 

94 98Mitchell, David . 

McDaniel, Krista .... 
174 218Mitchell, Jere . . 

McDill, Marty . . . 218Mitchell, Matt 



217McRae, Kathy . . 
217 

. . McWhorter, Evan 
217 

2Meador, David . 

2Meador., Jamie 

. . Meeks, Elizabeth .... 

217 98,218 

. . . Mehdor, Jamie . . 218 

109Meincke, Heather . . . 

5,218 
218Melick, Kristi . . 92,93 
. . . Metcalf, Lance 



218 
218 

169 



Latham, Keith . . 
Lauence, Teresa 

Lawrence, Ryan 

Leatherland, 

Samantha . . . 
Leazenby, Laura 



187McDowell, Danielle 
169 

187,McDowell, Jennifer 
213 

38,McEachin, Joe . 

163 

McFearin, Destry 
85 

• • • McFee, Amy . . . 
217McGavy, Frank . 



218 
199 
219 
219 
84, 85, 
90,219 

219 

219 

59, 

219 

... 219 

. 108, 

199,219 

. 98,99, 

100, 101 

218Mohr, Michelle . . 219 

38,Monroe, Beth ... 14 

218Montgomery, Jason 

9 

174Montgomery, Julie .. 
218 219 

175Montgomery, Rainer 



218Moers, Mark 



232 



Montgomery, 

Rebecca .... 
Moore, Betty . . . 
Moore, Eddie . . . 
Moore, Kevin . . . 
Morgan, Robert 

Morgan, Terry . . . 
Morris, Shannon 

Morrison, Christy . 

Morrow, Allison . . 

Morrow, Karen . 

Moss, Kimberly . . 
Mosteila, Cal ... 
99, 100, 
Moyer, Beverlly . . 
Mozingo, Michael 



3Newsome, Kelly 



165 



71 Newton, Christopher 



219 

174Nguyen, Manh 
59Nichols, Lori . . 
. . . Nichols, Michael 
187 

187Nicholson, Jill . 
. . . Nickles, Pin . . 
219Nipper, Natalie 



225 
193 
220 



P 



220Peterson, Paul 
Phelps, Kathy 
Phillips, Daniel 
Phillips, Jan . 
Phillips, Jason 



Mullen, Holly 
Mullen, John 
Munson, Paige 
Murray, Phil 
Murry, Phil . . 
Myatt, Beth . 
Myers, Ande . 



Myers, Les . 
Myrick, Nikki 



73, 



N 



219Nipper, Neil . 

75,Niven, Brandon 
219Nixon, Amy 
165,Noble, Ralph 
219Nolan, Russell 
220Nolen, Jim . . 

98,Nolen, Russell 
220 

128Norman, Leslie 
. . . Norman, Martie 
220 

220Nowell, Joseph 

78 
220 
174 

41 

220 

98 

22oO'Barr, Greg . . . 

/|7QO'Neal, Michael 

^O'Neal, Renee . 

Odle, Ryan . . . 

Odom, Gina . . . 

Oelschlager., Kim 



220 Pacneco " Bob 
220 Pa 9 an - Alicia . 

197 

94 Palmer, Charissa 

95, 220 n 

^Palmer, Dana . 

220 Parker ' Denise 

9 9n Parker, George 

• • - 166, 187 



221 
75 



. 41 
. 224 
. 221 
. 73 
221, 
223 
128, 
176 
168, 
169 
Platz, Mary 88 



Phillips, Lori 



73 
^Pierce, 



Jason 



33 



Poe, Randall . . 
Pollard, Cara . 
Ponder, Morgan 



ncParker, Jerelyn 

73 Parker, Jeri . . . 

c/j Parker, Jerri . . 

' 54 7 gParker, Roger . 

22o Parker « Stefanie 

149 220' >a^ ' <er, w '" iam 



Poor, Heather 
■ ^Powell, Beth 
0J - ^Powell, Carl 



O 



22o Pame,, » David 
Parrent, Elizabeth 

Patel, Bhavna . 
Patrick, Frank . 
Pattison, Chris 
Patton, John . . 
225Patton, Latricia 
51Payne, Todd 
92Peacock, Kelly 
65Peacock, Leslie 
128 97,98, 



118 

159 
221 
169 

221 
221 



221 
221 

Vl8 

155 

87 

222 

62 

Powers, Bruce ... 98, 
99, 101, 179,222 
Prater, Angela 118, 

128 

Price, Elizabeth . . 187 
Price, Erin 75 



Powell, Stephanie 



222 

163 



Oliphant, Lisa 



Nabors, Beth . . . 

Naccaroto, Carrie 

Nance, Jennifer 

Neal, Molly 

Neal, Rebecca . . 
Neill, Stephanie 

128, 
Nelson, Beth . . . 
Nelson, Bill ... 6 

Nelson, Donna . . 
Nelson, Rob .... 
Neuberger, Peter 

Newman, Mandy 

176, 
Newman, Mark . . 



40,Olivares, Marcel 
154oiiver, Elise . . 
. • • Oliver, Micheal 

98oison, Barbara 

Olson, Eric . . . 

220opalinski, Brett 

750rr, Annemarie 

220orr, Stephanie 

• • • Osaba, Ismary 

186osaba, Susset 
128 



. . Pedoto, Constance 
73 118 

69,Peeper, Mellyn ... 3 
71, 220Pelletier, Kimberly . . . 



Price, Jonathan 

^Prugh, Mary . . . 
22 Vuckett, Ann Jay 

225 222 

221 Pugh, Beth . . . 9,222 
^Pursley, Mary 
94 < Katherine .... 81 
^Puttman, Jonathan . . 



41 



Q 



66 221 

176Pelz, Tara 221 

166Pender, Michelle .... 

118 108, 109, 22lQualls, Kristen ..222 

118Pennington, Carol . . . Quattlebaum, Forrest 

220 221 92,98, 222 

220Pennington, Shannon Quick, Zippy ... 92, 
128 93,98, 101, 105, 199 



220 

220Pepper. Paige 
20, P©PPers, Lenora 
23 



128Quiett, Jeffery 
. 9, 

12 



222 



, 25,Osbome, Samantha Perdomo, Amarilys 
166 73 

• 6osbume, Kenya .... Perdue, Hayes 
220 220Perkins, Amy . 

• ■ • Oslander, Beth . . 44Perkins J Jeremy 
59ott, Chad 78Perkins, Judy . 

■ • • Otto, Krista 29Perrin, Mark . . 

220owen, Laura . . . 220Perry, Nandra . 
98,Qwen, LeAnne . . 225Perry, Shannon 
220 Owenby, MaryAnn . . Peter, Stan . 186, 



R 



98 

221 

153 
7g Rader, Gregory 

, 04 Rafferty, Lee 

, 73 Raley, Sarah . . 

^oRalph, Andrew 

^Rondles, Brian 

Rankin, Jana 



99, 



222 
78 
222 
222 
98, 
179 
128 



233 



Ready, Marty 

Redd, Amy . . 
Redmon, Andy 
Redmon, Ann 
Redmon, Ellen 
Reed, Danny 
Reed, Jesselyn 
Reed, Mark 
Reed, Rhonda 
Reeves, Jana 
Reeves, Nikki 



Reid, Karen . 98, 
Rhoades, Jimmy . 



165, 35, 87, 128, 
174, 175Rue, Angee .... 223 

222Russell, Justin . . . 66Shores, Jeff 
222Russo, David . . . 223Short, Christy 

222Ryce, Lori 223Shoun, Kristy 

222Rye, Scott . 118,128 



174, 223Shoemake, Dianne . . Springfield, Tara .... 

224 224 

. . 187Stagg, Lisa . . 94, 102, 
. . 66 107, 224 



s 



78 

66 

166 

222 

222 

45 

y, 76 Saies, Judith . . . . 

>IQ>I Sales, Sarah . . . . 

222 

Samples, Lee Ann 

174 
o/]SanAngelo, Kim . 



Shroff, Sumeet 
Siegfried, Tara 



Rhodes, James . 
Rhodes, Kimberly . . . « T . . 

128 222^ anc,ers ' Tncia 



Richards, Mary 

Katherine . . . 
Richerson, Beth 

Richey, Suzann . 
Rigsby, Sheryl . . 
Riley, Tom . . . 
Ringley, Amy . . 
Robbins, Lynette 

Roberts, David 
Roberts, Jeff . 
Roberts, Jody 
Roberts, Kathy 
Roberts, Kristin 
Roberts, Tori . 



Sandlin, Rob 
222$asser, Jason . . 

23Sawyer, Ginny 

222 Sawver ' Sharon . 

222 Saw Y Gr ' Stephen 

92, 96 e 

222Sayle, Jennifer . 

Saysombath, Say 



160,Stanley, Michelle . 2 
224Starkes, Monte ... 3, 
. 224 128 

. 20,Stedeford, Kelly . 95, 
22,23 98,99,101 

Siler, Lelia . 177, 224Steele, Card ... 78 
Silverstein, Debra . . . Steele, Robbie . . 157 

224Steenerson, Chad . . . 
68 Simpson, Greg . . 187 224 

6°'Simrell, Julie .... 98Stephenson, Kristee 
223 Simrell, Ruth Ann 224 

• • • 98, 101Stevenson, Kara .... 
225 Sisco, Jacqueline . . . 225 

• ■ • 224Stewart, Lincoln . 187 
^?Skelton, Rob . . . 128,Stokes, Alisa . . . 108, 
223 187, 224 109, 225 
/|87 Skipworth, Donna ... Stokes, Missy 
173 - 186, 224Stookey, Shelly . 
223 Slate, Scott .... 224Stout, Andy . . . 

^Smedley, Dean .... Stovall, Russ . . . 
223 128, 224Stringham, Kevin 

-Smith, Brian . . . 108, 98, 

223 109Styers, Amy .... 

^Smith, Christina . . 224Sullivan, Adrienne 



108 



Smith, James 



222 Scarbou 9 h . Shannon smith, Jeff . . 
169„ ■ ■ • • ; ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ • 223 Smith, Jennifer 



2 5 Scharbert, Mike 
a ^Schilleci, Donna Jo 

4 
38 ' 88 Scn '"' n 9' Candace 



40 



94, 

95, 224Sullivan, Stacy 
187Sumrall, Hope 
72,Sutton, Jason 



Robertson, Lisa . . 
Robinson, Roxann 

Roebuck, Ken . . . 
Rogers, Kelly . . . 
Rohdy, Tasha . . 

Romine, Karen . 



222 

11 



• • Smith, Marna 

25 Smith, Marni 

■ iSmith, Marta 
223 



73, 223, 224Swain, Dawn 



Smith, Randy 
Schmman, Jennifer Sm|fh Sean 

■ . .e km- /"n Smith, Sid . . . 

222 Schinman, Michelle . . Smlth| Stephen 

109 Schooley, Angela 
162, 



Ross, Kenyon 

64, 65, 222 
Ross, Todd ... 92, 98 
Rothermel, Sherrie 

38, 2 
Rowe, Chris 11, 
Rowe, Laurie 
Rowe, Mark 



, 2 Schuessler, Lila 
, 9A Scoggins, Bo 

222 Sco,t - Emi| V • • 
^t- Seary, Mark . . 

D Seay, Glen . . . 



Smith, Terri 
• 'o.Snaders, Greg 
° 'Snead, Debbie 
/jA7 Snyder, Karen 
™ 2 Sorrell f Ben . 
187 Spang, Blake 



224Swann, Jodey 
2, 224Sydnor, Karen 
224Sylvester, Jenni 

59 
187 
224 
174 

11 
174 
186 



fer 



225 

225 

78 

187 

100 
225 

225 
225 
177 
199 
186 
165 
157 

225 



T 



Seay, Monica 



35 '22 8 3 Sparks ' Katie • • 
" Speights, Jennifer 



156 

224 

19, 

158, 159 

. . . 75 



Tabor, David 
Tanis, Dawn 
Tate, David 



109, 



13, 
224 



^September, Donavan 



Spillman, Sharna 



Rowell, Beth . 
Rowlett, Janey 
Ruble, Andy . 
Ruby, Paul . 
Rudd, Justin . 



• 223 Shafer, John . . . 
22QSharp, Keith . . . 

84 85 Sneenan ' Patricl< 

' ^^Sheppard, Trey . 

' '^Shiell, Bill 

Y 6 Shirley, Darren . 



66 e 
224 Sp.vey, 



Billy 



Taylor, Laura . . 
nqTaylor, Mary Ann 

Taylor, Tracy . . 
>lg 6 Teal, Janice . . . 
^gTedford, Jeanne 



^Spivey! Eric '. '. 84, 98,! eramo ' Us £ 
174 " 224 Tester « EllzaDetn 



224 Spivey, Kathy Jo 
224 



174, 
14, 



224 
174 



Spivey, Rick 
Spray, David 



158, 177 

163 224 Tes * er « Teresa 
SpThomas, Clint 

83 Thomas, John 



186, 
187 
108, 
128 
225 
158 

38 
225 
118 

19 
225 



98, 99, 100 



225 

225 

3 

58, 

59,61 



234 



Thomas, Karen 

Thomas, Sara . 

Thomas, Scott . . 98,Utz, Scotty 

99, 100, 225 
Thome, Jowell . . 225 
Thompson, Cynthia . . 

225 
Thompson, Ian .174 
Thompson, Jennifer .... _ . . 

225 Va " e ' David 



225Underwood, Andy . . . 
225 128, 130, 226Waters, Connie 

. . 19, 88Waters, Susan . 



V 



Thompson, Michael 



Vance, Dean 



Thorn, Jennifer 



225VanDyk, Jon 

Thompson, Richard . ... 

25 i74 Vann - Becky . . 

163, Vann ' Cnip • • 
226Vann, Rebecca 

Thrash, Amy .... 104 w . 

Thurston, Tracie . . ^foughn, Knsti 
Tillis, Carrie . . 20, 23 Vaughn, Mark 

154, 226X eal ' Ana V 
Tillman, Tarn 
Tilton, Jesse . . 
Tinnermon, Amy 



. . . 108 
. . . 78 
. . 128, 
154, 226 
108 
108 

226 

226 

226 

166 

78 

73 



Watkins, Kerry . . 
Watson, Tracy 

Weaver, Cheri 
Weaver, Michael 

Weaver, Renee . 



Weaver, Ty 
Webb, Mark 



107 



Weigandt, Gina 
Westveer, Mike 



226Wood, Jason ... 227 
73Wood, Kim . . 11,227 

128Wood, Ron 169 

128Wood, Steven . . 227 
40,Wood, Tim ... 69, 71 

226Woodfln, Arnold .... 

163 227 

. . . Woods, Carrie . . 225 

227Woosley, Lee Ann . . . 

227 227 

71 Wright, Matt .... 59 

93,Wright, Sandy . . 156, 

227 157, 227 

68Wyatt, Angela . . 227 

98,Wynn, John .... 187 

227 



Whisenant, Michael 



White, Claire 
White, Dana 



Todd, Dwayne 
Toles, Melanie 

Tootle, Laurie 
Touliatos, Paul 



W 



White, Geoffrey 



Whitehead, Lisa . 
Whitehurst, Wendy 



7/jVerlander, Allen 
226 vlcker Y' Lisa . . 
Vineyard, Angie 
163 wi T 128 - 226 Whjte> Mjke 

173 Vise,Tara 226 White, Steve 

156, 
157 

25 
174, 
226 

Townsend, Tiffany oA Wade, Lauri .... 
179, 226 Wadsworth Brent 
Travis, Holly 
Traylor, Rick 

7/| Waidrep, Valita 
. 226 

226 Waldrop, Paige 

73 Walker, Craig . 

71 < 98 Walker, Gordon 
. 66 

• 7 4,Walker, Sandra 
75, 226walker, Tommy 
63, 174 Wa || |Caro | yn 

Tru ". Mike 63 WaM| Charles . 

Truss, David .... 59 Wa || er> Brad . . . 
Tucker, Todd ... 226 193, 226 wllliams ' Terri 

Tuning, Jamie . . . 226walther, Danielle . . . Williams, Tina 
Turman, Anne-Marie 226 w '" ls ' Jennifer 

^ward, Liesl 84, 



Y 



128 

227 

201, 

227 

Yarberry, Brian 

227Yarborough, Bill 

64 
^Yates, Krista . . 

Yeatman, Wes 

161 

Younce, Kim 

225 163, 225 

^pYoung, LeAnn . . 199 



174 

197 
227 
179, 
187 
37, 



Trettell, Jennifer 
Tripp, Michelle 
Trivette, Amy . 
Trotter, Dara . . 
Trotter, Doug 
Trotter, Joe . . 
Troxclair, Sherri 

Trull, Kelly . . . 



Z 



Tyree, Marta 



U 



Whitlock, Tim . , 

>,04Whitt, Ellen 158 

Whorton, Kristi ... 84, 
226 " " 36, 37", 39, 226 1 06 

118 Walden. Julie . . . 226 Wil 9 us . Debbie . . 21, 

29, 165 

226 Wilkerson . Stephanie zukoski, Martina 

63 227 

j a Williams, Amy . . 68, 

227 

226 Wi " iams » Chere .... 

226 227 

73Williams, Ernie . . 59 

oo^Williams, Kasandra . . 

226 227 

A± Williams, Lester 65 

. . 186 

. . 227 

. 128, 

227 
71, 175, 

227 

. . 227 

. . 227 

51,62 

. . 118 

80 



227 



84 <Wardlaw, Derek 
106 

Wardlaw, Melanie 
Wareham, Nancy 
Warhurst, Julie 
Waters, Brian . . . 
Waters, Christopher 



Willis, Matt . 

167 

Wills, Savanna 

/^Wilson, Beth . . 

Wilson, Chris . . 
256Wilson, Donald 
>I49 Wilson, Melanie 

/|53Wise, Chip 17 

98 Witt, Ellen 227 

223Wobb, Becky ... 13 

Wood, Doug ... 227 



235 



Multiple 
Choice : 

What's the best way to create a yearbook? 




E 



Yearbook republishing (Macintosh, 
Apple, or IBM) 



All of the above— 'No matter what your 
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So it you'd like to have greater freedom of choice, 
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that creatine a yearbook irrnnn i\/T /°vn 
doesn't have to mean M 1 AY LUK 

going by the bcx>k. publishing company 



236 



SAMFORD 
UNIVERSITY 
BOOKSTORE 




There's 

a secret 

place 

inside 

our hearts 

where 

all our 

dreams 

are born. 



CONGRATULATIONS 



Serving Your Campus Needs 



237 



Congratulations 
Class of 1991 



The 1991 - 1992 
Student Executive Board 



Scott McBrayer 

President 

San Wright Dana Glasscock 

Vice President - Senate Vice President - SAC 



Jeff Roberts 

Chief Justice 



Jason Pierce 

Treasurer 



238 



Compliments of: 



Ida V. Mqffett 

School of Nursing 

SAMFORD 

UNIVERSITY 



We speak with our eyes, 

teach with our hands, 

comfort with our presence. 



239 





■rt E 




Carry the card that has Bulldos bite — the new 
Samford University - AmSouth Bank VISA card! 

Available now, this card offers you: 

• No annual fee the first year 

• Competitive interest rates 

• 25-day srace period 

• Cash bonus when you pay off your old 
MasterCard or VISA account with an advance 
from your new Samford VISA 



In addition, every time you use the Samford VISA 
you'll be helpins the Harwell G. Davis Library. 
Because AmSouth Bank will donate a portion of all 
charges to our growing library collection. 

For a free application, simply call 1-800-888-7215 

(in Birmingham, 870-2349). Call today — and charge 
like a Bulldog! 




240 



Compliments of: 



SAMFORD 
UNIVERSITY'S 

Journalism/Mass 

Communication 

Department 

Entre Nous 
i'l CRIMSON 



WSU 91.1 FM 



241 



Right 

on 

the 
money 

At First Alabama, we know how money works and we can make 

it work for you. With The Right Place, The Right Card, 

The Right Call and many other services, 

you can lean on the green. 



first Alabama Bank 



242 



Congratulations 

and 

Good Luck 

to the 

Class of 1991 



Sam ford Dining Service 



^ 



Harriott 



243 




UDLOW 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



WU' Grvicd/' 



7 



We are powerless 
to turn bacJ< the c/oc/< 

and our memories dim 

hut a beautiful instant 

in the lives 

of those photographed 

for this yearf)ool< 

we have captured forever. 

Sudl ow 



127 N Vermilion Sltpel 
Danville, IL 61832 



244 



There are thousands 

of reasons our 

name stands out. 

PARK ELEMENTAR Y SCHOOL 'ROCKWALL MIDDLE SCHOOL 'TUTTLEHS*BETH SHALOM ACADEMY -NEW HOME HS* JUNIOR HS 131 -BETHEL COLLEGE -GREEN OAKS HS-MICHIE SCHOOL-EASTERN OKLAHOMA 
ST ATE COLLEGE -PALM HARBOR MIDDLE SCHOOL* FRANKLIN HS- NEW YORK MEDIC Al COLLEGE -MADISON MIDDLE SCHOOL* AH I E7ER YESHIV A* LEXINGTON ACADEMY -GRISSOM HS* SI RAUGHN HS- VICTO 
RY BAPTIST SCHOOL • CORN t LL MEDIC AL COLLEGE -JESS LANIER HS-JACKSBOROHS-UNIV OF ALABAMA St H OF NURSING -DALLAS CHRISTIAN HS* BRYAN STATION JR HS* BUCKEYE HILLS ■ TEXAS STATE 
SCHOOL FOR DEAF • SHILOH i IS - CENTRAL ST A TE UNIV • WEST HOCKS MIDDLE SCHOOL • CARLETON COLLEGE ■ HUME R- VIII SC HOOLS* FISK MIDDLE SCHOOL * RICHARDSON WEST JR HS* TAYLOR CO JUNIOF 
HS-HARRODSBURG HS* WEYAUWEGA HS* WANETTE HS*0 BANNION MIDDLE SCHOOL-LITTLE AXE SCHOOL -LONE OAK MIDDLE SCI IOOL-INCARN ATE WORD ACADEMY* NORTH HOUSTON BAPTIST* JACKSO> 
HS-HOGG MIDDLE SCHOOL -PAXTON IIS-LUISA DESSUSCRUZ IS 5'2- HOPF PROTESTANT SCHOOL -DULLES JUNIOR HS- OAKLEY HS-SAM RAYBURN ISD-ST MATTHEW SCHOOL -GRANDVIEW HS* TEXAS CITY 
HS* KINGSLANDHS* LAKE VIEW HS*OGILVIEHS- MEMORIAL JUNIOR I IS -TENSAS ACADEMY -LINDSAY HS* LOS FRFSNOS HS'ST GFX>RG A ACADEMY • ARANSAS PASS HS- AUSTIN ACADEMY • LAKESHORE BAP 
TIST- JERSEY COMMUNITY HS- FT PIERCE WESTWOODHS* PARKERS CHAPEL HIGH* SOUTHVIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL -CENTRAL HS-BUSSEY MIDDLE SCHOOL *BA1 AMON MILITARY ACADEMY* HERMAN W MAD 
DOX MIDDLE SCHOOL- SHARON-MUTUAL HS-TABEKNACLE CHRIS! IAN SCHOOL *WALBHIDGE AC ADEMY'CLAKKSDALF. LEE -KENNEDY MIDDLE SC HOOL ■ MAHVELL AC ADEMY -BLUE MOUNTAIN HS-BRAMA1 1 
HS-GILBER1 HS* MUSKINGUM PERRY CAREER CTR-GROVEPORT MIDDLE SCHOOL -OLATHE-BEREAN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL *BRIARFIELD ACADEMY -SPOON RIVER VALLEY HS-ST ACNES AC ADEMY • W1LLIAN 
JAMES JRHS-PITTSBURGHS-WAYNOKAHS-EULMORE MIDDLE SCHOOL* HOMINY HS • CLAUDE HS- MEMORIAL JUNIOR HS-MCADORY HS- MURRAY CO JUNIOR HS- CASTLE HILLS FIRST BAPTIST -ELDORALX 
HS-HANSTON HS-CASSV1LLEHS* CHANDLER VILLEHS'IOTAHS* HEATH US- SENATHHORNERSVILLE HS- THAYER HS* FROST HS* HUGO HS-COOSA HS-HURLEY R-l SCHOOLS* LUNDAHL JUNIOR IIS-LYTLF 
HS- ELLIS HS-DUNLAPHS-IMANUEL LUTHERAN SCHOOL* MUSKOGEE HS-S U BISHOP ST ATE JR COLLEGE *FINLEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 'HERITAGE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL -INGLESIDE HS- MISS WADE'S FASH 
tONMERCU COLL -ST FREDERICK HS -CHINESE HERITAGE CONVENTION* SAMNOR WOOD SCHOOL • TRAVIS JUNIOR HS*PEKIN COMMUNITY HS- ALEXANDRIA SENIOR I IS -MIAMI CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 'QUIGLE^ 
5EMINARY NORTH PREP SC * RIVEHSIDE-BROOKF1ELD TOWNSHIP- WM FISHER CATHOLIC • SIMPSON ACADEMY • REFORMED BIBLE COLLEGE 'BONN ABEL HS' HOULKA HS • N Y COLLEGE OF CHIROPRATIC MEl 

• DELHI JUNIOR HS'DILL CITY HS'HUTSON VILLE HS*CLINCH VALLEY COLLEGE -HENDR1CK SCHOOL • HAMILTON HS- DEL VALLF MIDDLE SCHOOl * EASTERN HEIGHTS HS-BAY HS'GRACF CHRISTIAN SCHOOl 
•FERRIS JUNIOR HS'PURCELLHS- KEMPER AC ADEMY-KENNEDALE PRIM ARY'KARNSHS-BOLTWOOD FRESHMEN EVANSTON TWP- PINE BLUFF HS- NOR THSIDE HS- KELLY HS -HARDIN -JEFF ERSON HS'A/LE 
JUNIOR HS' MIDLAND HS' MCDONALD MIDDLE SCHOOL 'UNIV OF MISSISSIPPI LAW • WHITE LAKE CHRISTIAN -COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH • CHRIST THE KING SCHOOL • HE ALY HS • THOMAS EDISON JUNIOf 
HS* LA VEGA HS* EDGE WOODHS* WEST MESQUITEHS- PARKVIEW JUNIOH HS'GRAHAM JUNIOR HS* LONDON MIDDLE SCHOOL -SEBRING MIDDLE SCHOOL* BELEN JESUIT PREPARATORY* FARRAGUTMIDDLI 
SCHOOL -HARRISON JUNIOR HS* AUTOMOTIVE HS* EPPS HS* VINE GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL -STKAKE JESUIT ■ EUSTACE HS-CENTERVILLE HS • BHIEN MCMAHON HS - FREMONT HS* HUNTINGDON Hf 
•1MACULATE HEART CENT SCHOOL -LEXINGTON COMMUNITY EDUCATION • 1 ASCOSA HS-WHl !"E HOCK HS-CUMMINGS INTERMEDIATE 'PADUC AH HS- KNOX COUNTS JOINT VOC SCHOOL -5PAULDING MIDDLI 
SCHOOL -SAM HOUSTON HS -SANDERSON HS-A B MACL AY SCHOOL -COYLE MIDDLE SCHOOL • DICKSON JUNIOR HS-ST BENEDICT At AUHURNDALE -WOLFE MIDDLE SCHOOL -CLEAR LAKE HS* OZARK JUNIOf 
HS« RUSSELLVILLEHS' HENRY ADAIR JR HS 'GEORGE FISHER MIDDLE SCHOOL -STEVENS MIDDLE SCHOOl • BERRY HS- AFTON HS* JANE ADDAMS VOC HS* J PTARAVELLA HS- HUMPHREY HS-CALLOWA1 
COHS- NORTH WOODHS* CAPITAL DAY SCHOOL* BLUE RIDGE K-8 SCHOOLS- CARROLL HS- SOUTHEAST HS* ST CLAIR HS-F AST GR AND RAPIDS MIDDLE SCH • BAPTIST MEDICAL SYSTEM B SU 'BRIDGE CITl 
JUNIOR HS- BENJAMIN HS* MEDINA VALLEY HS- JACKSON MIDDLE SCHOOl .-GREENVILLE HS-MINDEN HS -SMIT1 1 VILLE HS* SOUTH WESTER N ADV EN TIS1 COLLEGE • WEBSTER INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL- WIS 
CONSIN INDIANHEAD TECHNICAL- OUACHITA HS- RIVER ROAD HS- WILSON HS-MUl HALL-ORLANDO HS* BAY HS-WHITN ALL HS*DAHLSTROM MIDDLE SCHOOL* POTEAU HS* COLBERT HS» HANCOCK NORTI 
CENTRAL • DEKALB HS- BOLES JUNIOR HS- ISLAND CHRISTIAN SCHOOL* AlVARADOHS- VI AN HS-CORNELLCOLLE.GE-UNIV OF TENNMEMPHIS-CENTER POINT ELEMENTARY 'JEFFERSON ACADEMY- WAR 
REN WOODS MIDDLE SCHOOL- EVERGLADES CITY HS- BR AY DOYLE HS- LINCOLN MIDDLE SCHOOL- STONEWALL SCHOOL- EUREKA JUNIOR HS* WASHINGTON JUNIOR HS-SEI A. ERS MIDDLE SCHOOL -JUN10I 
HS 22- SEYMOUR R II SCHOOLS -LONG PRAIRIE HS* THOMPSON IIS* HOLY TRINITY EPISCOPAL -GRE<iORY MIDDLE SCHOOL • PARSONS HS-JONESBORO ELEMENTARY -ST CLAIR MIDDLE SCHOOL -CEMENT H; 
■ HUDSON HS* EMERSON JUNIOR HS* ST ANNE '5 SCHOOL -ENTERPRISE JUNIOR HS' MARLING TON MIDDLE SCHOOl * WARREN HS -CENTRAL INTER MEDIATE -ENGLISH VALLEYS HS* NEW CANEY HS-CHRISTIAf 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL - BROOKHOLLOW CHRISTIAN • WALTER WELLBORN HS • EDNA HS ■ MC ALESTEK HS • GUERNSEY NOBLE CAREER CTR • ONAMIA HS • IRAAN HS • ARKANSAS COLLEGE -CHUCKEY DOAJ 
HS-LUMBERTONHS* BARRY UNIV -HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIV • RONCALLI HS • SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY JR H SCHOOL • NORTHWESTERN HS • SCURRY ROSSER HS-ADA HS- DESOTO SCHOOl -BRANDENBUR( 
MIDDLE SCHOOL -OVERTON HS* VALLEY HEAD HS* CANTON SOUTH HS- WELEET if A HS- HASTINGS HS* MIAMI NORLAND SENIOR HS* PIL1-SBURY BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEG • LAWRENCE VILLE HS*DEERR1VEI 
HS-MT PLEASANT HS- BOTTENFTELD JUNIOR HS-BIXBYHS- BUCKEYE CHRISTIAN -RICHARDSON JUNIOR IIS* BE ARDEN MIDDLE SCHOOL -J B PENNINGTON HS* TYHONE HS* ASHTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOl 

• UN10NTOWNUSD235HS-WAUKEGAN WEST HS- GENESEE HS-S F AUSTIN MIDDLE SCHOOL- ST LOUIS- HARR1M AN HS-SAM RAYBUKN HS- MOODY HS-MOON JUNIOR HS- B T WASHINGTON CLASS OF 196! 

• BROOKLYN LAW SCHOOL • VIGOR HS- PILGRIM BIBLE ACADEMY * Wl IE A TON HS -SEMINOLE HS -QUEEN VOCATIONAL HS'SHEL TER HOCK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL- WAUNAKEE HS- ADRIAN HS- INDIAN VALLE' 
MIDDLE SCHOOL -OLIVIA HS- GREENFIELD HS-ALGOM A CHRISTI AN • MELVIN-SIRLEY I IS- FREEDOM HS- PETERS COLONY ELEMENTARY SCH* ALVIN C YORK INSTITUTE -CAMBRIDGE HS-ORDEAN JUNIOH H: 

• NORTHLAND HS ■ BARWISE JUNIOR HS - NORTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL • ALEXANDRIA HS • WEBB MIDDLE SC HOOL • LA 1 (ARPE HS • REGIS HS • MCLE WIS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL • HUGHES KIRK HIGH CHOOI 
•LONG ISLAND CITY US' NORTH GREENE IIS* LAKE SUPERIOR STATE UNIV • CENTRAL MIDDLE SCHOOL -CROSS VILLE HS* BOURBON CO HS • ROSS S STERLING • PINELLAS PARK CHRISTIAN • WILLIAMSON H? 
•WEST SENECA CHRISTIAN SCHOOL * OSSEO HS- TX COL OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE • FOX TECH HS- TARPON SPRINGS HS- WILKINSON MIDDLE SCHOOL • W K KELLOGG- J J PEARCE HS- RALEIGH EGYPT H! 

• GREENSBURGHS-CUDAHYHS-SHENAP NYU-CARROLLTON HS-GLENCOE ELEMENT AH Y SCHOOL • THE LEARNING ACADEMY *SAYRE SCHOOL- WRIGHT CITY IIS* WATKINS JUNIOR HS* VALLEY LUTHERAT 
HS-HOUSTON MIDDLE SCHOOL -GROVE SCHOOL- A C MOSLEY HS'GARNEH JUNIOR HS- MARTIN JUNIOR HS- FA YETVILLE HS-NEWKIRK HS-MAYFTELD JUNIOR HS-BRONSON HOSPITAL SCH/NURSING -FORD 
HAM UNIV LINCOL^CTN-IS 1 45 • OZARK HS* THOMAS JEFFERSON JUNIOR HI SCH • MARTIN LUTHER KING JR HS *S> I VAN HILLS HS- HOPES HS- WEDGWOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL ■ MT VERNON IIS* HANDLEY H! 
•OLIVE BRANCH MIDDLE SCHOOL -BAY POINT MIDDLE SCHOOl -WAYNE 5TATE UNIV *KELLYVILLE HS'GLENCOE MIDDLE SCHOOl -ORANGEF1ELD JUNIOR HS- MEMORIAL HS- FULTONDALE ELEMENTAR' 
SCHOOL 'WOLFE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 'JEFFERSON DAVIS ACADEMY • FULTONDALE HS* NOR WOOD BAPTIST CHRISTIAN SCH ■ KINMUNDY ALMA ELEMENTARY • SANTA MARIA DEL POPOLO SCHOOL -EDGE 
WOODHS-BEDICHEK MIDDLE SCHOOL • GULF MIDDLE SCHOOL • EAST NEWTON HS • LABETTE CO HS* MONTtREY HS'GLIDDEN HS • HARDIN SIMMONS UNIV • YOAKUM HS> NEWARK CATHOLIC HS- DOWNER: 
GROVE SOUTH HS-GORHAMHS-BELLETERRE MIDDLE SCHOOL -STMICHAELSHS* WINGFIELDHS-CAHTER RIVERSIDE*CHICOHS*TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE HS-LOOPHS'C ALVIN US-CHEROKEE MIDDLE SCHOOl 

• FOWLERVlLLEHS*NEW DEAL US- JUNIOH HS I 42K- NORTH ROYALTON IIS- COPEL AND HS* ACADIAN A HS- SCOTT HS- OKEECHOBEE JUNIOR HS* TRIWAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL -JACKSON HS-KNOXVILL1 
CATHOLIC HS-BHECKENRIDGEHS* MURPHY HS'PATTON SPRINGS I IS -STEVENSON HS-BONIT A SPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL • CASTLE WOODHS-L A PKYOR EI EMENTARY SCHOOL -HELEN KELLEH ELEMENTAR' 
SCHOOL -ST AUGUSTINE S COLLEGE • SO TERREBONNE I IS* BLUM 'GEORGIA INSTITUTE/TECHNOLOGY -HENDERSON HS-WEST BROOK HS- JOSHUA US* MARSHALL HS- RICHMOND HILL HS- BE AVER SCHOOl 
•PITKIN HS'BROWN WOOD HS-DORA HS'PRINCIPIA COLLEGE -GHANBY ELEMENT AHY SCHOOL'COOSA VALLEY ACADEMY *CLOUTIER VILLE HS'WOODVILLE HS* KAPLAN HS- RISING STAR HS'GRACE CHRIS 
TIAN SCHOOL -COLLEY VILLE MIDDLE SCHOOL -PRENTISS CHRISTIAN -LUBBOCK CHRISTIAN HS- LANIER HS- BLACK OAK ELEMENTARY 'BAHTLESVILLE HS- HEBREW ACADEMY HS* JUNIOR HS 10-PINSOI 
HS-MORTONHS'CLEAH LAKE INTERMEDIATE* FERRIS HS- LEXINGTON IIS -PAN AM A HS- DENVER CITY HS- PINELLAS CO JEWISH DAY SCHOOL • EMERSON SCH OF PERFORMING ARTS-EVANGELICAL CHRIS 
TIAN- FAYETrE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL * RICHLAND HS • CHARLES HENDERSON HS ■ THOMAS HS • BRADLEY JUNIOR HS - BELL CITY HS -CASSE VILLE HS - KETCHUM HS- STRINGER HS- SURING HS - WELLINGTOI 
LANDING COM MID SCH • FL1PPIN HS- PRATTVILLE HS- EVERGREEN HS • BASS MEMORIAL AC ADFMY - EDEN PRAIRIE HS- TEMPLE CHRIS MAN • HIGGINS HS • TALLADEGA HS ■ BIBLE BAIT 1ST CHRISTIAN -SOUT1 
PEMISCOT HS-HEHNDONMAG.NET 'SHEFFIELD HS'SAN JOSE CATHOLIC'LA GRANGE HS*GUYMONHS*FLINTHILLSHS-SAMF"ORD UNIV -COVINGTON HS' WARRIOR HS'BREWER MIDDLE SCHOOL' WASHING 
TON HS* CAVE SPRINGS HS*0 HENRY MIDDLE SCHOOL 'GRAND SALINE HS * ASSEMBLE CHRIS DAN • BELLA ILLE HS* HAHN VII IE HS' ELKHART HS* HENRIETTA HS« FAR ROCKAWAY HS- COMANCHE HS- H I 
ZACHRY ■ MONTEZUMA HS- UNION CITY HS- KELLER HS-ATWELL MIDDLE SCHOOL *MONTVERDE ACADEMY 'LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF DAI I AS- DULUTH CENTRAL HS* LEESTOWN JUNIOR HS* NEW YORK LAV 
SCHOOL* HARRISONBURG HS- BOWIE HS • WASHINGTON COMM IIS • COTTAGE GROVE SCHOOL • BE THAN Y LUTHERAN COLLEGE • ARLINGTON HEIGHTS • MARY IMMACULATE • WASHINGTON HS • P1TTSBUR< 
HS« ORANGE HS • UNITY POINT ELEMENTARY • E D WHITE CATHOLIC HS- FAUBION MIDDLE SCHOOL • PARHOTT JUNIOR HS-ALIEF HAS TINGS • PURDY R II SCHOOLS • CHAMOIS HS -GUTHRIE HS • VISTA CAM 
•NW RANKIN ATTENDANCE CENTER • YESH1VA TORAH TEMIN A -SCOFFEYVILLE SCHOOL -HARPER CREEK JUNIOR HS-ROBB1NSDALE COOPER HS- BRISTOL UNIV • CREST VIEW ELEMENTARY • WASH1NGTOI 
HS- NORTH DESOTO HS-CROCKETT HS- KLEIN OAK HS'MERTON WILLIAMS JR HS -CENTRAL HS* MENOMINEE INDIAN HS* ALEXANDER SCHOOL- ME ADOWLAWN MIDDLE SCHOOL -IOWA PARK HS*ALLUWl 
HS'MT CARMELHS* HIGHLAND HOME HS-CONCORD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL -MOUNDS PARK ACADEMY- UNAK A HS-PIONEER-PLEASANTVALE HS-SOUTH HIGHLANDS MAGNET- SILVER SANDS JRHS'E ALTO! 
WOOD RIVER COMM HI SCH -DOWNSTATE SCHOOL OF NURSING • TARRANT MIDDLE SCHOOL • A PPLING MIDDLE SC HOOL -J ACKSONVILLE HS • EST AC ADO JR US* HARDIN CENTRAL MIDDLE SCHOOL • TEMPLI 
BAPTISTSCHOOL'BISHOP HOSECRANS-SOUTH JUNIOR HS-WESTSlDEHS-LAKESIDE HS-SCHULTERHS* WES 1 HILL ACADEMY • RIVER OAKS SCHOOL • HATLEY HS'BOOTHVILLE-VLNICEHS-CHILTON COUNT 
HS'MARTINSVTLLE HS-FT COBB HS'PLAINS HS- PICHEH C ARD1N HS'HAMSHIRE-FANNETTIIS-MARCUSHS'HOLLANDHS-CCX KE COUNTY HS* ALL SA1NTSSCHOOL* HARROLDHS-ADAMSV1LLE ELEMENTAR' 
SCHOOL -MOORELANDHS-HAMEY SCHOOL* BISHOP WARDHS- WAYNE TRAIL ELEMENTARY SCHOOl • ILLINOIS MA THASCTENCE ACADEMY • NIMIT7 IIS -JACKSON VILLE COLLEGE- HINDS JUNIOR COLLEGI 
•NYCOLI EGF,< HIROPR At TIC MEDCN* SPRINGER HS'GOLDENPLAINSHS-GULLn EH PKEP-FRASER HS* AUBURNDALE HS-CALUME T HS-LEFORSHS* R1L»GE WOODHS- SKYCREST CHRIST I AN SCHOOL -SPIETI 
STUDIOS * C AH » ER MIDDLE SCHOOL -FAIRBORNHS- CALVIN COLLEGE -LAKE PUREST COLLEGE • LEWIS COUNTY HS* BAILEY JUNIOR HS- JOAQUIN HS-HFN FRANKLIN HS • WEST HS • W AL I ERS HS- WARREI 
CENTRAL HS-METHHOSP SCHOOL OF NURSING- DAVENPORT HS-MUSCLESHOAISHS- WAYNE CO US -GROVE JUNIOH HS- FELT HS- RIVER \ A 1 .1 FY HS- POWELL JUNIOH MS- NORTH FT MYERS HS-CLAYCTT 
ELEMENTARY. JOPPA ELEMENT ARYSCHOOL-S7 JOSEPH HS-HRIAHWOOD CHRIS HANHS-I "TOW AH MIDDLESCHOOL *C»> TTEY CULLEGE-HARRISON JUNIOH HS*DCEVEHESTHS*Al RORA UNTV -WAUKEGA- 
EAST HS-SPRINGDALE HS* RYE MIDDLE SCHOOL *FORMAMlS*LYNN HS* RALEIGH ECi IT JR HS'GOOD HOPE HS- FHoM MIDD! E SCHOOL • HUDSON US ■ STRATFORD HS • RHODES S( HOOL- KYLE MIDDLI 
SCHOOL 'THE JOHN COOPER SCHOOL -SCOTT ( F NTRAL HS- NOVICE HS-HUEYTOWN HS -r.ARDFNDALE HS*MILLBR<*>k JUNIOR HS -OAK GROVE HS-L SU IN ALEXANDRIA -WEST OAK MIDDLE SCHOOL -1SH 
PEM1NG HS-TOML1NSON JUNIOR HS • WEYERHAEUSER HS- EISENHOWER JUNIOR HS • MANOR HS-MT I'LL ASANT C HRISTIAN ACADEMY • Mill .WOOD HS • ETOWAH HS- L EE MIDDLE SCHOOL • COLL1NSVILL. 
US' AC. NEW MIDDLE SCHOOL* COTTONDALE ELEMENTARY St HOOL ■ KLEIN FOREST HS' LEE HS* WHITE OAK HS-ST JOHN LUTHERAN SCHOOL -ST GEORGE HS'OFAI I ON TOWNSHIP HS-ABFRNATHY H 
•BILLINGS HS'GATLINBURGPITTM AN HS'BROMREREKELEMt NT AHY Si | lOOL'OLTONHS. FAIRFIELD UNION HS-LA GROVE HS*TENMILESCHOOL*WYOMIN(, CENTRAL Sv HOOL'BRINKLEY JUNIOR HS- MAR 
LOW I IS • CLE V ELAND HS* PUR YEAR SCHOOL • HOL TON HS* PEARCE MIDl»LE SCHOOl • AVER\ COONI.FY ELEM SCHOOL - MORRISON HS • ALBRIGHT MIDDLE SCHOOL- PARKWAY HS • H1LLCREST CHRISTIAN 
HITCHCOCK HS'MUNDAYHS- POWELL VALLEY HS- MINNEHAH A Al ADE MY -OAKLAND HS-t HANDLER HS-H SP V A-SOUTHE AST LAUDERDALE -ROANE CO HS-PINSONF1. EMENTARY SCHOOL 'MCMINN COUN 
TYHS'NAiTORHS'LM SMITH MIDDLE SCHOOl -CANYON MIDDLE SCHOOL* BOISE CITY HS- IZARD COUNTY HS-STOCKTON HS* HALLS HS-GEORGI A TEC H NROTC-FORES1 LAKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL' WES 
TON JR-SHHS' THAMES VALLEY ST ATE TECH COL* SFBRING HS • '1 PHUS HS- WEST WCX)D HS- EARLVILLE HS'GOSHEN CHRISTIAN ACADEMY .cnSHOCTON HS- LAGRANGE HS-OLIVE HS- WHITE HALL H 
•SACRAMENTO JUNIOR HS - CALHOUN HS-GAYLFSVILLE HS-DONDERO I IS -RANSOM EVERGI ADES SC HOOL • VICTORY CHRISTIAN Si HOOL 'STEPHEN I- AUSTIN UNIV • POST HS- WAGONER HS-TONKAW 
HS ■ HARRISON CHILHOWEE BAPT 1ST ACD- ST MICHAEL SCHOOL • DEL C REST JUNIOR HS- JEFFERSON CITY HS-FAJTH BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE- LAKE DALLAS HS* MADISON HS* JENKINS HS-QUL1N MIDDL 
SCHOOL -ROCHESTER ADAMS HS- CORNERS TONE CHRISTIAN -CENTRAL JUNIOR HS- LAKE SHORE HS-WELLSVILLE SENIOR HS- LOWES h I FMENTARY SCHOOL • PAGE ELEMENT ARY-STl : AH T IIS*WEBSTE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL- SHALLOW ATERHS- WASHINGTON JUNIOH HS -MID-BUCHANAN COR V H S-MALAKOFF HS- VAN HS-SEDALIA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL- SOUTH-YOUNG HS- PROVIDENCE HS- TRI-C JUNIOI 
HS 231 -JUDAH CHRISTIAN ACADEMY • TALOGA HS ■ OAKMAN HS • ST MAHTINV1LLE IIS* DO DSON HS*CAMPBELL JUNIOR HS-PHILLIPSBUHG HS -GREEN VILLE CHRISTIAN -CENTER POINT HS- SACRED HEAR 
•BOKCHITOHS- PERRY BAPTIST • GRANT HS* ATWATER-GROVE CITY HS-SEILING HS-JEM1SON HS- EAST RANKIN ACADEMY* WAHRENSVILLE HEIGHTS HS-JUDSON COLLEGE -N B FORREST HS* WILSON H 

• WEAVER HS'THOMASVILLEHS-BRODHEADHS- RICHARDS JUNIOR HS-PIZITZ MIDDLE SCHOOL -HERITAGE CHRISTIAN -LAMAR SCHOOL -CLEARBROOK HS-THE CHILDHENS HOUSE • SAM HOUSTON JUNIOi 
HS-1 H KEMPNER HS • LAWTON CHRISTIAN SCHOOL *YESHIV A JOSEPH GRUSS* TAYLOR SENIOR HS* CENTRAL JUNIOR HS- SANTA ROSA HS-V ALLEY HS* UNIV OF TEXAS N ROTC -SPIRO HS' UNIV OF ARKANSA 

• HOBARTHS'POTEET HS- BROOKF1ELD ACADEMY -BLAND COMBINED SCHOOL -GREEN WAY HS-GRESHAM HS-OAKDALE JH HS- JET-NASH HS* MCCULLOUGH HS •BLIRKBURNETT JUNIOH HS*EAKLYHS 
HELE.NA-GOLTHYHS- BENDING OAKS-ENFIELDHS- NORTH DICKINSON* WACONIAHS* WESTERN HI! LS HS* ROBE K T E I FT I IS -SPRING BRANCH JUNIOR HS-ST MARY SCATHOLIC CENTRAL H S-FOWLEHVILL 
•MEADE HS- NORTH JUNIOH HS* LIBERTY JUNIOR I IS-I S 77- BELLAIRE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY -PORT ALLEN HS-EISENHOWER HS-GRUNDY SR HS- YOUNG HARRIS COLLEGE-SELLS MIDDLE SCHOOL-TRINIT 
VALLEY - DUBLIN HS- NEWAYGO MIDI H F SCHOOL* WILSON HS* FOREST LAKE SENIOR HS • EMINENCE HS'CHILLICOT HE HS- PALM BEACH GARDENS HS • CENTRAL JUNIOR HS* LA WHENCE-WEST* CATOOS 
HS-CSAF DIRECTORY -JAM EST ALTON SCHOOL* WHITEHAVEN HS-CLINTON COUNTY CHRISTIAN SCH* ROSAHY HS-AWTY INTERNATIONAL* LORETTOHS- MANCHESTER HS- GRAIN VALLEY SENIOR HS- LAKE 
VIEWHS-OCONEECOHS-AVlLACOl LEOE-DFLCAMBHE HS -GUSHING MIDDLE SCHOOL • C LARENCE VII. I. F IIS • SWEE T WATER HS-EULESS JUNIOR HS* TYLER STREET CHRISTIAN -BALDWIN JR/SR HS-SULL 
VAN CENTRAL-SPRINGTOWNHS-WG RHEA SCHOOL -UNIV HS • HURST JUNIOR HS- AZALEA MIDDLE SCHOOL ■ NORTHLAND LUTHERAN HS ■ THE COLONY HS ■ PAWNEE HEIGHTS HS • CENTRAL HS ■ JORDA 
COLLEGE -DANBURY HS* LICK CREEK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ■ HUSH SPRINGS HS- MEMORIAL JUNIOH HS- FAIR VIEW HS- CONVERSE US • BUNA HS- MEEKER HS* WEST MEMORIAL JUNIOR HS • ST BARBAR 
HS • SEYMOUR HS ■ ELY HS- MIDLOTHIAN HS • PORT ARANSAS HS- GRACE LUTHERAN * MARTIN LUTHER KING HS -JEFFERSON CHRISTIAN AC ADEMY - SEAHREEZE HS * SHATTUCK HS • COVINGTON MIDDL 
SCHOOL • PRAGUE HS* SHAW YOUTH HOCKEY* CADIZ HS* PUTNAM COUNTY HS-BHOOK WOOD HS* WES TERN ANDERSON HS* STRATFORD HS »ST MARY S ACADEMY • MELBOURNE HS- INDEPENDENT RAPTIS 
COLLEGE • MILLSAP HS • TRIWAY HS* PATHW AY CHRIST IAN SCHOOL * NORTH I JNNHS*DOUGL AS HS- WOODLANDS AC ADF MY* RE YLK)NHS*WIl LOW RIDGE HS* HUGHES MIDDLE SCHOOL* LAMAR JUNIOR HS 
TOWN SOUTH HS- VICTORIA HS* DEER PARK HS' PA WNEE HS-CALDWELL HS- WYOMING JUNIOR HS- ITAWAMBA COMMUNITY COLLEGE -CAMP MYSTIC* PALM BEACH PUBLIC- ATLANTA ADVENTIST ACADEM 

Our customers. 



At Taylor, we didn't get to be the most 
important name in yearbooks by working alone. 

We got there by listening to and learning from 
the people we serve. By sharing knowledge. 
Exchanging ideas. And by building on experience 
so that each yearbook we produce is better than the 
one that came before it. 

For 50 years, we've built our reputation on this 
give and take. It's a way of doing business we 
think our customers deserve — and appreciate. 



To be honest, we like it too. Because, through 
our customers, we've discovered a lot about 
ourselves — what we do well, how we can 
improve, and where the future of yearbooks is 
going. 

So, although most people never notice our name 
printed on the back of their yearbooks, that's OK. 
There are more important ways to make a name for 



yourself. 



1550 West Mockingbird Lane 
Dallas. TX 75235 



800-677-2800 



STAYLOR 



ING C0MPAN 



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ally takes place in the 
spring. The men of the Al- 
pha Phi Omega sen/ice 
fraternity sponsored a 
new Mr/Miss Samford 
Pageant. The men on this 
campus won't quite be 
the same. The old mixed 
with the new made this 
year "Twice as Good" as 
the year before. Al- 
though there were bad 
days, rainy days and 
cold days, they were bal- 
anced out by the good 
days, sunny days and 
warm days. This year was 
a year of prayer for the 
troops and it was a year 
for bonding between stu- 
dents. This year was 
"Twice as Good" as the 

last. Donna Kern 



It is a funny thing about life; if 

you refuse to accept anything 

but the best, you very often 

get it.W. Somerset Maugham 



Khristen Deichert and Dana McCants sing 
"It's great to be a Zetal" 




Eric King and Andy Halstead say their PI Kappa 
Alpha brotherhood is strong as a brick. 



Scott McBrayer entertains the crowd at Howards 
during Talent Night. 



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istan Deichari and Dana McCants show their ZTA pride 




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Marc Beaule wants to know "where you going Nancy Wareham'